Sons of the Goddess: A Young Man's Guide to Wicca

Overview

2006 COVR Awards Book of the Year

Wicca 101 for young men.

Wicca is a spiritual path open to all. Yet young men may have trouble identifying their place in this seemingly female-dominated religion. Without many male role models, how can one become empowered as a son of the Goddess?

Christopher Penczak, who learned about Witchcraft and magick in his late teens, offers guidance to all the young men out there who...

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Overview

2006 COVR Awards Book of the Year

Wicca 101 for young men.

Wicca is a spiritual path open to all. Yet young men may have trouble identifying their place in this seemingly female-dominated religion. Without many male role models, how can one become empowered as a son of the Goddess?

Christopher Penczak, who learned about Witchcraft and magick in his late teens, offers guidance to all the young men out there who are curious about Wicca. This much-needed masculine perspective on the Craft discusses divine masculinity found in ancient myths, male energies, and rites of passage. Penczak also describes the fundamentals of Wicca, including the rule of three, the Wiccan Rede, spellcraft, rituals, holidays, and Witchcraft ethics.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780738705477
  • Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd.
  • Publication date: 4/1/2005
  • Pages: 206
  • Sales rank: 311,893
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 0.44 (d)

Meet the Author

Christopher Penczak is an award-winning author, teacher, and healing practitioner. He has studied extensively with witches, mystics, shamans, and healers in a variety of traditions from around the world to synthesize his own practice of magick and healing.

Formerly based in the music industry, Christopher was empowered by his spiritual experiences to live a magickal life, and began a full-time practice of teaching, writing, and seeing clients. He is the author of the award-winning Temple of Witchcraft series: The Inner Temple of Witchcraft, The Outer Temple of Witchcraft, The Temple of Shamanic Witchcraft, and The Living Temple of Witchcraft Volumes 1 and 2.

His other books include City Magick (Red Wheel/Weiser), Spirit Allies (Red Wheel/Weiser), Gay Witchcraft (Red Wheel/Weiser), Magick of Reiki, Sons of the Goddess, Ascension Magick, Instant Magick, The Mystic Foundation, The Witch's Shield, The Witch's Coin, and the forthcoming The Witch's Heart. Christopher Penczak resides in New Hampshire. Visit him online at http://www.christopherpenczak.com.

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Read an Excerpt

The Witch’s Walk:
First Steps on the Path
One of the first things I learned about witchcraft is that you must walk your talk. Not everyone should go around calling himself a witch, but with so many personal and eclectic traditions ofWicca, there is no central authority, council, or agency that certifies people as witches. And most witches prefer it that way. I know I do. So then, how do you become a witch? I was taught that true witches know their stuff. They know their Craft,
their history, and their science. True witches, as opposed to those just playing with the idea of being a witch, not only know these things, they live them. True witches strive to live a life of balance, harmony, health, and magick. Some of us are truly witches at heart,
but if you want to be a true witch, you should seek to know your history and traditions and learn the skills to put them into practice.
If you come across people who only talk about putting spells on others or talk about how powerful they are, then they are not walking the witch’s path. Powerful people don’t need to tell you how powerful they are. They simply are, and they know their greatest power is over themselves and their own reactions, rather than their power over other people.Witches walk a path of wisdom, and wisdom tells us when to use magick and when to wait and watch.

what is wicca?
"Wicca" is a word that causes a lot of confusion today. Usually,
it refers to the modern revival of the Old Religion, the religion of witchcraft. The root of the word "witchcraft" can be traced to the words wicca and wicce. Some scholars believe the root means to "bend or shape." This refers to the witch’s ability to do magick, to bend or shape the energies of life to create spells and healing. Others think the word means "wise," relating to the root of the word "wizard," and they think of witches as the keepers of wisdom. The more you study the Craft, the more you will find differing opinions among witches, scholars, and experts.

Modern witches often use the word "Wicca" and "Wiccan"
instead of "witchcraft" and "witch" in order to prevent the bad feelings that the word "witch" can conjure in people.
Alternately, some think "Wicca" refers to the religion and
"witchcraft" to spellwork. Many others use "Wicca" to refer to formal traditions of witchcraft, such as Gardnerian or
Alexandrian Wicca, and they think of eclectic practices as simply "witchcraft." I use the words "witch" and "Wiccan"
fairly interchangeably, depending on those around me, but I
prefer the word "witch." I think it is important to make that word less scary to people, and if they see loving, happy, helpful witches, then we can break those old stereotypes.

Many practitioners also use the word "pagan," from
Latin. It refers to the people of the rural lands and, historically,
the word became associated with the Old Religion duringthe rise of Christianity. All witches/Wiccans are pagan,

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Table of Contents

contents
List of Figures . . . ix
Introduction . . . xi
1. The Witch's Walk
First Steps on the Path . . . 1
2. Divine Sons and Mothers
The First Stories . . . 15
3. Men's Mysteries
Forgotten Wisdom . . . 33
4. Meditation Magick
The Power of Stillness . . . 57
5. Living in the World
Roles and Responsibility . . . 79
6. The Way of Ritual
Remembering You Are Sacred . . . 99
7. Spellcraft
The Tools of Life . . . 129
8. Walking the Wheel
Holidays of the Witch . . . 159
9. The Magickal Promise
Dedication to the Craft . . . 175
Bibliography . . . 183
Glossary . . . 185

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