Sophie Loves Jimmy (Faithgirlz!: The Sophie Series #10)

( 15 )

Overview

Sophie doesn’t see why a rumor that isn’t true should stop her from being Jimmy’s friend—but when even the Corn Flakes start to believe the whispers, she is hurt to the core. Now it’s an open question whether she and the rest of the Flakes can ever be friends again!

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Sophie Loves Jimmy (Faithgirlz!: The Sophie Series #10)

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Overview

Sophie doesn’t see why a rumor that isn’t true should stop her from being Jimmy’s friend—but when even the Corn Flakes start to believe the whispers, she is hurt to the core. Now it’s an open question whether she and the rest of the Flakes can ever be friends again!

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780310710257
  • Publisher: Zonderkidz
  • Publication date: 4/28/2006
  • Series: Faithgirlz! Series , #10
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 879,452
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.38 (d)

Meet the Author

Nancy Rue has written over 100 books for girls, is the editor of the Faithgirlz Bible, and is a popular speaker and radio guest with her expertise in tween and teen issues. She and husband, Jim, have raised a daughter of their own and now live in Tennessee.

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Read an Excerpt

Sophie Loves Jimmy


By Nancy Rue

Zondervan

Copyright © 2006 Nancy Rue
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-310-71025-1


Chapter One

Cynthia Cyber, Internet Investigator, leaned toward the computer screen, eyes nearly popping from her head. Could it be that a kid would actually be enough of a bully to print something like THAT for all the middle-school world to see? Impossible-and yet, there it was, a sentence that was already showing its ugly self on computers in bedrooms all over Poquoson, Virginia, and maybe even beyond. It was a sentence that could ravage the social life of its seventh-grade victim before she even checked her email.

"I cannot allow it!" Cynthia Cyber, Internet Investigator, cried. She lunged for the keyboard, fingers already flying -

"It's a seven-passenger van, Little Bit," said a voice from the driver's seat. "You don't have to sit in Jimmy's lap."

Sophie LaCroix jolted back from Sophie-world at several megahertz per second-or something like that. She found herself staring right into Jimmy Wythe's swimming-pool-blue eyes. She had no choice. She really was in his lap.

A round, red spot had formed at the top of each of Jimmy's cheekbones. Sophie was sure her entire face was that color.

"Do you want to sit on this side?" Jimmy said as Sophie scrambled her tiny-for-a-twelve-year-old body back into her own seat. "We could trade."

"I don't think that's what she had in mind."Hannah turned around from the van's middle seat in front of them, blinking her eyes against her contact lenses practically at the speed of sound. She was Sophie's inspiration to keep wearing glasses. "Personally, I think seventh grade's a little young to be dating. I know I'm only a year older, but-"

Mrs. Clayton didn't turn around in the front seat, but her trumpet voice blared its way back to them just fine. "There is actually a world of difference between seventh graders and eighth graders."

Yeah, Sophie thought, fanning her still-red face with a folder. Eighth graders think it's all about the boy-girl thing. I am SO not dating Jimmy Wythe. Or anybody else! EWWW. She scooted a couple of inches farther away from Jimmy.

It wasn't that Jimmy wasn't a whole lot more decent than most of the boys at Great Marsh Middle School. He was one of the three guys who made films with Sophie and her friends. They didn't make disgusting noises with their armpits and burp the alphabet in the cafeteria-like some other boys she knew. But date him-or anybody else?

I do not BELIEVE so!

"So, are you guys going out or what?" Hannah said.

"Not that it's any of your business." Oliver, the eighth grader next to her, gave one of the rubber bands on his braces a snap with his finger. Why, Sophie wondered, did boys have to do stuff like that?

"Oh, come on, dish, Little Bit," Coach Nanini said from behind the wheel. He grinned at Sophie in the rearview mirror in that way that always made Sophie think of a big happy gorilla with no hair. She liked to think of him as Coach Virile.

She had to grin back at him. "We're not going out," Jimmy said. The red spots still punctuated his cheekbones. "We're just, like, friends."

Mrs. Clayton did turn around this time, although her helmet of too-blonde hair didn't move at all. "That's very noble of you, Jimmy, to get Sophie out of the hot seat like that. You're a gentleman."

"Ooh, Mrs. C," Coach Virile said, still grinning. "Don't you know that's the kiss of death for the adolescent male?"

"It's okay," Jimmy said. He pulled his big-from-doing-gymnastics shoulders all the way up to his now-very-red ears. "It's what my dad's teaching me to be."

"Bravo," Mrs. Clayton said. "I'd like to bring him in and have him train the entire male population of the school."

Coach Virile's voice went up even higher than it usually did, which was pretty squeaky for a guy whose beefy arms stuck out from both sides of the driver's seat. "I thought I was doing that, Mrs. C."

"I wish you'd step it up a little," she said.

Sophie glanced sideways at Jimmy, who was currently ducking his head of short-cropped, sun-blond hair. I guess he is kind of a gentleman, Sophie thought. She had never heard him imitate her high-pitched voice like those Fruit Loop boys did, or seen him knock some girl's pencil off her desk just to be obnoxious. And somehow he managed to be pretty nice and still cool at the same time. The Corn Pops definitely thought so. The we-have-everything girls were always chasing after him.

"So if you're not going out," Hannah said, "why were you in his lap?"

She was turned all the way around now, arms resting on the back of her seat as if she were going to spend the rest of the trip from Richmond exploring the topic. Oliver groaned.

"Inquiring minds want to know," Hannah said.

NOSY minds, you mean, Sophie thought. But she sighed and said, "I wasn't really sitting in his lap. Well, I was, only that wasn't my plan. I didn't even know I was doing it, because I was being-well, somebody else-and Jimmy's window was a computer screen-all our stuff's piled up and blocking my window so I couldn't use it-anyway, it all started with the conference. I really got into it."

Coach Virile laughed, spattering the windshield. "We can always count on you to be honest, Little Bit."

"Let me get this straight," said Oliver. "You were pretending to be, like, some imaginary person?"

"More like a character for our next film."

Jimmy, still blotchy, nodded. "For Film Club. Sophie always comes up with the main character."

"I play around with it some before I tell the whole group," Sophie said. "I try not to get too carried away with it in school." She didn't add that if she got in trouble for daydreaming, her father would take away her movie camera.

"Ya think?" Hannah said. She put on her serious face. "A little advice: don't tell that to a whole lot of people at Great Marsh. You'd be committing social suicide."

"Especially don't let it get out on the Internet," Oliver said. "Everybody'll think you're weird."

"I am weird," Sophie said. "Well, unique. Who isn't?" That was the motto of Sophie and her friends, the Corn Flakes: Keep the power God gives you to be yourself.

"I may be weird," Hannah said, "but I do not go around acting out imaginary characters, okay?"

You wouldn't be very good at it, Sophie thought. She ran an elfin hand through her short wedge of honey-colored hair and squinted her brown eyes through her glasses.

"What?" Hannah said.

"Well," Sophie said slowly, "you might not be unique in that way, but you are somehow. Everybody is."

Hannah's eyebrows twitched. "I try not to let that get out. I'd like to get through middle school without being the punch line of everybody's jokes, thank you very much."

"Speaking of bullying." Coach Virile cleared his throat.

"Yes," Mrs. Clayton said. "What did you glean from the conference?"

"Can I 'glean' if I don't know what it means?" Oliver said.

"It means what did we learn," Sophie said. It came in handy to have a best-best friend who almost knew the whole dictionary. Fiona, she knew, would be proud.

Hannah gave Oliver a poke. "So what did you glean, genius?"

Oliver held up his folder, which had the shield of the Commonwealth of Virginia on it, and the words "Governor's Conference on Cyber Bullying." He flipped it open and read, "'Seventeen million children in America use the Internet. Twenty to thirty percent of them report being victims of bullying through email, instant messaging, chat rooms, websites, online diaries, and cell phone text messages.'"

(Continues...)


Excerpted from Sophie Loves Jimmy by Nancy Rue Copyright ©2006 by Nancy Rue. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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First Chapter

Cynthia Cyber, Internet Investigator, leaned toward the computer screen, eyes nearly popping from her head. Could it be that a kid would actually be enough of a bully to print something like THAT for all the middleschool world to see? Impossible---and yet, there it was, a sentence that was already showing its ugly self on computers in bedrooms all over
Poquoson, Virginia, and maybe even beyond. It was a sentence that could ravage the social life of its seventh-grade victim before she even checked her email.
'I cannot allow it!' Cynthia Cyber,
Internet Investigator, cried. She lunged for the keyboard, fingers already flying---
'It's a seven-passenger van, Little Bit,' said a voice from the driver's seat. 'You don't have to sit in Jimmy's lap.'
Sophie LaCroix jolted back from Sophie-world at several megahertz per second---or something like that. She found herself staring right into Jimmy Wythe's swimming-pool-blue eyes. She had no choice. She really was in his lap.
A round, red spot had formed at the top of each of Jimmy's cheekbones. Sophie was sure her entire face was that color.
'Do you want to sit on this side?' Jimmy said as Sophie scrambled her tiny-for-a-twelve-year-old body back into her own seat. 'We could trade.'
'I don't think that's what she had in mind.' Hannah turned around from the van's middle seat in front of them, blinking her eyes against her contact lenses practically at the speed of sound.
She was Sophie's inspiration to keep wearing glasses. 'Personally,
I think seventh grade's a little young to be dating. I know I'm only a year older, but---'
Mrs. Clayton didn't turn around in the front seat, but her trumpet voice blared its way back to them just fine. 'There is actually a world of difference between seventh graders and eighth graders.'
Yeah, Sophie thought, fanning her still-red face with a folder. Eighth graders think it's all about the boy-girl thing. I am SO not dating
Jimmy Wythe. Or anybody else! EWWW. She scooted a couple of inches farther away from Jimmy.
It wasn't that Jimmy wasn't a whole lot more decent than most of the boys at Great Marsh Middle School. He was one of the three guys who made films with Sophie and her friends. They didn't make disgusting noises with their armpits and burp the alphabet in the cafeteria---
like some other boys she knew. But date him---or anybody else?
I do not BELIEVE so!
'So, are you guys going out or what?' Hannah said.
'Not that it's any of your business.' Oliver, the eighth grader next to her, gave one of the rubber bands on his braces a snap with his finger. Why, Sophie wondered, did boys have to do stuff like that?
'Oh, come on, dish, Little Bit,' Coach Nanini said from behind the wheel. He grinned at Sophie in the rearview mirror in that way that always made Sophie think of a big happy gorilla with no hair.
She liked to think of him as Coach Virile.
She had to grin back at him.
'We're not going out,' Jimmy said. The red spots still punctuated his cheekbones. 'We're just, like, friends.'
Mrs. Clayton did turn around this time, although her helmet of too-blonde hair didn't move at all. 'That's very noble of you, Jimmy, to get Sophie out of the hot seat like that. You're a gentleman.'
'Ooh, Mrs. C,' Coach Virile said, still grinning. 'Don't you know that's the kiss of death for the adolescent male?'
'It's okay,' Jimmy said. He pulled his big-from-doing-gymnastics shoulders all the way up to his now-very-red ears. 'It's what my dad's teaching me to be.'
'Bravo,' Mrs. Clayton said. 'I'd like to bring him in and have him train the entire male population of the school.'
Coach Virile's voice went up even higher than it usually did, which was pretty squeaky for a guy whose beefy arms stuck out from both sides of the driver's seat. 'I thought I was doing that, Mrs. C.'
'I wish you'd step it up a little,' she said.
Sophie glanced sideways at Jimmy, who was currently ducking his head of short-cropped, sun-blond hair. I guess he is kind of a gentleman,
Sophie thought. She had never heard him imitate her highpitched voice like those Fruit Loop boys did, or seen him knock some girl's pencil off her desk just to be obnoxious. And somehow
10
he managed to be pretty nice and still cool at the same time. The Corn
Pops definitely thought so. The we-have-everything girls were always chasing after him.
'So if you're not going out,' Hannah said, 'why were you in his lap?'
She was turned all the way around now, arms resting on the back of her seat as if she were going to spend the rest of the trip from Richmond exploring the topic. Oliver groaned.
'Inquiring minds want to know,' Hannah said.
NOSY minds, you mean, Sophie thought. But she sighed and said, 'I wasn't really sitting in his lap. Well, I was, only that wasn't my plan. I didn't even know I was doing it, because I was being---well, somebody else---and Jimmy's window was a computer screen---all our stuff's piled up and blocking my window so I couldn't use it---anyway, it all started with the conference. I
really got into it.'
Coach Virile laughed, spattering the windshield. 'We can always count on you to be honest, Little Bit.'
'Let me get this straight,' said Oliver. 'You were pretending to be,
like, some imaginary person?'
'More like a character for our next film.'
Jimmy, still blotchy, nodded. 'For Film Club. Sophie always comes up with the main character.'
'I play around with it some before I tell the whole group,' Sophie said. 'I try not to get too carried away with it in school.' She didn't add that if she got in trouble for daydreaming, her father would take away her movie camera.
'Ya think?' Hannah said. She put on her serious face. 'A little advice: don't tell that to a whole lot of people at Great Marsh.
You'd be committing social suicide.'
'Especially don't let it get out on the Internet,' Oliver said.
'Everybody'll think you're weird.'
'I am weird,' Sophie said. 'Well, unique. Who isn't?' That was the motto of Sophie and her friends, the Corn Flakes: Keep the power God gives you to be yourself.
'I may be weird,' Hannah said, 'but I do not go around acting out imaginary characters, okay?'
You wouldn't be very good at it, Sophie thought. She ran an elfin hand through her short wedge of honey-colored hair and squinted her brown eyes through her glasses.
'What?' Hannah said.
'Well,' Sophie said slowly, 'you might not be unique in that way, but you are somehow. Everybody is.'
Hannah's eyebrows twitched. 'I try not to let that get out. I'd like to get through middle school without being the punch line of everybody's jokes, thank you very much.'
'Speaking of bullying.' Coach Virile cleared his throat.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 15 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 17 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 3, 2011

    cayla

    this is the best book of all the sophie books!!! it's great.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2012

    Very good

    I just have the sample but i already love it.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2013

    Love love love

    I love these books! I have all 12 of them!! <3

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2012

    Manya

    I love this book

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2012

    Great!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Sophie books are great for me because i am homeschooled and my name Sofia but everybody calls me Sophie and that's why i love these books

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2012

    Awesome!!!

    This is one of the best books in the series! LOVED it! :D

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 9, 2011

    samantha

    this was a good book

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2013

    Sophia Sophies biggest fan

    So want to read it nancy rue wont disapoint me or else...

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2012

    How do i use this?

    Please help me figure out how to post my name!

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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