Sophocles' Antigone / Edition 1

Sophocles' Antigone / Edition 1

3.5 2
by Bertolt Brecht, Judith Malina
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0936839252

ISBN-13: 9780936839257

Pub. Date: 05/28/2000

Publisher: Hal Leonard Corporation

(Applause Books). Sophocles, Holderlin, Brecht, Malina four major figures in the world's theatre have all left their imprint on this remarkable dramatic text. Friedrich Holderlin translated Sophocles into German, Brecht adapted Holderlin, and now Judith Malina has rendered Brecht's version into a stunning English incarnation. Available for the first time in English.

Overview

(Applause Books). Sophocles, Holderlin, Brecht, Malina four major figures in the world's theatre have all left their imprint on this remarkable dramatic text. Friedrich Holderlin translated Sophocles into German, Brecht adapted Holderlin, and now Judith Malina has rendered Brecht's version into a stunning English incarnation. Available for the first time in English.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780936839257
Publisher:
Hal Leonard Corporation
Publication date:
05/28/2000
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
72
Sales rank:
606,160
Product dimensions:
5.38(w) x 7.94(h) x 0.17(d)

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Sophocles' Antigone 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My school is performing this play next year, so I thought I would read the play to get an understanding of it. I knew the story, since I had read the old Sophocles version in my English class. Yet, Brecht was very creative in modernizing the setting of the play while maintaining some of the antique language and verse form. By setting the Antigone story in a city facing the immediate effects of World War II, we the readers can recognize the timelessness of Sophocles' play and constant relevance of Antigone's struggle: one righteous person (a woman, no less) fighting against the tyranny of one man. There is no change in the plot from Sophocles' version, but Brecht added a prologue that serves as a synopsis. This is not a play that can be read easily or lightly, but I certainly find it more provocative and engaging than Sophocles' version.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago