Sorrow in Our Heart: The Life of Tecumseh

Sorrow in Our Heart: The Life of Tecumseh

by Allan Eckert
     
 

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A biography of the famous Shawnee describes Tecumseh's plan to amalgamate all North American tribes into one people, his role as statesman and military strategist, and his death in the Battle of Thames.

Overview

A biography of the famous Shawnee describes Tecumseh's plan to amalgamate all North American tribes into one people, his role as statesman and military strategist, and his death in the Battle of Thames.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Though there are many biographies of the great Shawnee chief Tecumseh (1768-1813), this effort by historical novelist Eckert ( The Frontiersman ) may spark new interest--and controversy--with its ``hidden dialogue'' technique. After more than 25 years of research, the author felt free to recreate Tecumseh's conversations and thoughts in what proves to be an entertaining blend of fact and fiction. The orator and organizer's life was shaped by his tribe's tragic confrontation with westward-moving whites, who encroached on Native American lands along the Ohio River valley. His long struggle against this dispossession led Tecumseh to create a historic confederacy of tribes, but this crowning achievement was destroyed by his own brother at Tippecanoe in 1811. Eckert's dialogue is clunky, yet his colorful evocation of this seminal American figure will be more broadly accessible than are drier, more factual accounts. ( Feb. )
Library Journal
Eckert (A Sorrow in Our Heart, LJ 2/15/92) stands on an uncommon ground between academic and popular writers. His use of the "hidden dialog" as a means of writing history had been termed "documentary fiction." Here, he takes on the long and varied history of the Ohio River valley, engendered by indigenous Americans and settlers from European powers-French, Dutch, English, and Spanish. Eckert introduces a considerable number of Indians into the Ohio environment, utilizing a variety of fascinating primary resources to tell the history of the region and its people from 1768 to 1795. The final product, readable and rich in history, nevertheless will create problems for the historian and concern for the general reader. Those looking for a thorough history of the valley will be disappointed, and book selectors need to be aware of the type of history this book represents.-Boyd Childress, Auburn Univ. Lib., Ala.
Jay Freeman
In the middle of the eighteenth century, English colonists began drifting into the trans-Allegheny valley of the Ohio River, the first spasmodic thrust of the westward movement. They inserted themselves into a volatile milieu; Frenchmen and a seemingly endless variety of Native American tribes traded, competed, and frequently warred with one another. To paraphrase Trotsky, those looking for tranquillity picked the wrong place and time to be born. Eckert's gift for connecting the lives of scores of obscure characters with a broader context provides the same masterful mix that made Evan Connell's "Son of the Morning Star" a delight for both the scholar and the general reader. Although the famous (e.g., Mad Anthony Wayne) and the near famous (e.g., Arthur St. Clair) are given their due, Eckert is at his best in chronicling the lives and fates of ordinary people who ferociously struggled with nature and with one another to hold their piece of ground. An eloquent and often heartrending portrayal of a fascinating and pivotal epoch in American history.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780553561746
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
02/28/1993
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
1088
Sales rank:
382,423
Product dimensions:
4.20(w) x 6.89(h) x 1.76(d)
Age Range:
14 - 18 Years

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