SOS! The Six O'Clock Scramble to the Rescue

SOS! The Six O'Clock Scramble to the Rescue

4.2 7
by Aviva Goldfarb
     
 

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Dinner with kids shouldn't be a battleground. And it shouldn't make a martyr out of the parent whose job it is to get it on the table fast, fresh and hot every day at 6 PM. Aviva Goldfarb's cheerful Scramble system takes the hassle and worry out of mealtime. Her users and readers rely on her grocery lists, weekly meal plans and recipes not just for the healthy

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Overview

Dinner with kids shouldn't be a battleground. And it shouldn't make a martyr out of the parent whose job it is to get it on the table fast, fresh and hot every day at 6 PM. Aviva Goldfarb's cheerful Scramble system takes the hassle and worry out of mealtime. Her users and readers rely on her grocery lists, weekly meal plans and recipes not just for the healthy dinners themselves but for taking the stress out of dinnertime. She wants families to actually enjoy their dinners together! Now, with SOS! The Six O'Clock Scramble to the Rescue, Goldfarb is taking an extra of-the-moment stress away from meal planning for busy families: concern about the environment, about the cost of shipping out-of-season food halfway around the world, about packaging, about additives and preservatives.

In SOS! The Six O'Clock Scramble to the Rescue, readers will get a full year of weekly meals that:

--help readers eat seasonally without missing their favorite foods
--move toward a slightly more vegetarian menu for health and a lighter environmental footprint
--reveal when organic matters (and when it doesn't)
--save money through easy, efficient planning, bulk buying, freezing and storing, and avoiding waste
--pack the power of achievable ethnic meals, such as Easy Cheesy Tex Mex Scramble and Greek Pasta Salad
--make grocery trips count

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Creative, healthy, unprocessed and kid-friendly without being adult-alienating….a whole new kind of happy meal.” —O, The Oprah Magazine on The Six O'Clock Scramble

“You CAN find time to cook. Ordering in too often? [Try this] easy, yummy, gotta-try alternative.” —Reader's Digest

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312578114
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
04/13/2010
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
382,724
Product dimensions:
7.54(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.96(d)

Read an Excerpt

SOS! The Six O'Clock Scramble to the Rescue

Earth-Friendly, Kid-Pleasing Dinners for Busy Families


By Aviva Goldfarb

St. Martin's Press

Copyright © 2010 Aviva Goldfarb
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-312-57811-4



CHAPTER 1

the well-stocked kitchen

the scramble staples list


A GOOD LIST OF STAPLES to have on hand can help you in the following ways:

Shop Sales: You can take advantage of local store specials or bulk purchases on these commonly used items.

Stock Your Freezer: Frozen fish, chicken, and vegetables often have the same nutritional value as fresh but are less expensive and can be stored longer with less waste.

Shop Faster: Your grocery trips each week should be even faster if you are well stocked with staples. You should be able to focus your shopping excursions mainly on fresh produce, meats, and dairy.

Stretch Your Meals: With a well-stocked pantry, you can more easily pull together an extra meal or two with unused ingredients in your refrigerator from the week's meals. (The Scramble's recipe database at www.thescramble.com can help!)

Depending on the size of your kitchen and pantry, you can stock up on one or several of the following items. Those items marked with an asterisk (*) are used especially frequently in Scramble recipes and are great candidates for bulk purchase.


Pantry Staples

• oils: olive oil*, vegetable or canola oil*, peanut oil, sesame oil, nonstick cooking spray*, butter, or margarine*

• vinegars: red wine vinegar, rice vinegar, balsamic vinegar*

• vinaigrette salad dressing (or you can make your own)*

• Dijon mustard

• minced garlic (buy in ajar or mince fresh garlic yourself)*

• ketchup and barbecue sauce

• reduced-fat mayonnaise

• Asian sauces: reduced-sodium soy sauce*, hoisin sauce

• wines: rice wine, white cooking wine, red cooking wine, dry sherry

• pitted black and green olives, capers

• bread crumbs, panko, cornmeal, flour

• sweeteners: white and brown sugar, honey pure maple syrup

• grains: white or brown rice*, quinoa, couscous, wild rice

• pasta (regular or whole grain), variety of shapes*

• cans or boxes of reduced-sodium chicken or vegetable broth*

• 26-ounce jars red pasta sauce*

• 15-ounce cans tomato sauce*

• 28-ounce cans crushed tomatoes

• 28-ounce cans whole tomatoes

• 15-ounce cans diced tomatoes*

• 15-ounce cans naturally sweetened corn kernels (or use frozen kernels)

• canned beans: black*, kidney*, cannellini, and pinto* beans

• salsa*

• nuts: pine nuts, walnuts*, slivered almonds, pecans (store open bags of nuts in freezer)


Spices

• basil

• bay leaves

• black pepper*

• chili powder*

• ground cinnamon

• ground cumin

• curry powder

• dry mustard powder

• garlic powder*

• kosher salt

• oregano

• white pepper

• rosemary

• salt*

• salt-free lemon-pepper seasoning

• thyme


Freezer Staples

• frozen broccoli

• frozen chopped spinach

• frozen peas

• frozen edamame (with or without shells)

• frozen corn

• shredded Cheddar and part-skim mozzarella cheese, divided into 1-pound packages

• salmon (preferably wild), divided into 1- to 11/2 — pound packages

• firm white fish fillets such as tilapia, cod, and flounder, divided into 1- to 11/2-pound packages

• peeled and deveined shrimp, divided into 1-pound packages

• boneless chicken (white or dark meat), divided into 1-pound packages

• ground turkey, chicken, or beef, divided into 1-pound packages

• precooked turkey or chicken sausage, mild or spicy

seasonal guide to fruits and vegetables


A note to readers about this seasonal guide: This chart is a guideline for menu planning purposes. Not all produce is available in all regions and climates at the same time, while some fruits and vegetables are available year-round because they thrive in cold storage or are imported from tropical climates. For more information about what is in season in your region, visit your local farmers markets or see the resources listed at the end of this chart.


FRUITS

Bananas (all year)

Honeydew melons (February-October)

Mangoes (April-August)

Oranges (November-June)

Pineapples (February-August)

Tangelos (January-October)


VEGETABLES

Artichokes (March-May)

Asparagus (March-June)

Avocados (all year)

Broccoli (October-May)

Carrots (all year)

Celery (all year)

Green or wax beans (April-October)

Lettuce (all year)

Onions (all year)

Peas (April-July)

Peppers (all year)

Potatoes, white (all year)

Snow peas and sugar snap peas (June-July)

Spinach (March-May)

Tomatoes (May-August)

Zucchini (May-September)


FRUITS

Bananas (all year)

Blueberries (June-August)

Cantaloupes (May-September)

Cherries (May-June)

Crenshaw melons (July-October)

Figs (July-September)

Grapes (June-December)

Honeydew melons (February-October)

Kiwi (June-August)

Mangoes (April-August)

Nectarines and peaches (June-September)

Pineapples (February-August)

Plums (June-September)

Strawberries (June-August)

Watermelons (May-August)


VEGETABLES

Avocados (all year)

Beets (June-October)

Cabbage (all year)

Carrots (all year)

Celery (all year)

Corn (May-September)

Cucumbers (May-August)

Eggplant (August-September)

Green or wax beans (April-October)

Lettuce (all year)

Onions (all year)

Peas (April-July)

Peppers (all year)

Radishes (May-July)

Potatoes, white (all year)

Snow peas and sugar snap peas (June-July)

Squash, summer (June-August)

Swiss chard (June-August)

Tomatoes (May-August)

Zucchini (May-September)


FRUITS

Apples (September-May)

Bananas (all year)

Grapefruit (October-June)

Grapes (June-December)

Crenshaw melons (July-October)

Pears (August-May)

Persimmons (November-January)

Pomegranates (September-November)


VEGETABLES

Avocados (all year)

Beets (June-October)

Broccoli (September-May)

Brussels sprouts (October-November)

Cabbage (all year)

Carrots (all year)

Cauliflower (September-November)

Celery (all year)

Green or wax beans (April-October)

Kale (October-February)

Lettuce (all year)

Onions (all year)

Parsnips (October-April)

Peppers (all year)

Potatoes, sweet (September-December)

Potatoes, white (all year)

Squash, winter (September-November)


FRUITS

Apples (September-May)

Bananas (all year)

Dates (August-December)

Grapefruit (October-June)

Grapes (June-December)

Honeydew melons (February-October)

Pears (August-May)

Oranges (November-June)

Pineapples (February-August)

Tangerines/Clementines (November-January)


VEGETABLES

Avocados (all year)

Broccoli (October-May)

Cabbage (all year)

Carrots (all year)

Celery (all year)

Kale (October-February)

Lettuce (all year)

Mushrooms (November-April)

Onions (all year)

Parsnips (October-April)

Peppers (all year)

Potatoes, sweet (September-December)

Potatoes, white (all year)

Some of the data for this chart is provided by: Fruits & Veggies — More Matters® courtesy of Produce for Better Health Foundation (PBH), www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org, and by Betty P. Greer, Ph.D., R.D., Professor, Family and Consumer Sciences, University of Tennessee Extension.

For more information about what is in season in your region, visit: www.fieldtoplate.com/ guide.php.


five weekly spring menus

To help you embrace all the fresh flavors of spring, here are five tasty weekly menus. (You can also make your shopping a breeze by grabbing the accompanying organized grocery list for each of these menus at www.thescramble.com/SOS.)


week 1

Lemon-Oregano Chicken

Grilled Caramelized Ginger Salmon

San Francisco Joes

Ravioli with Spinach and Sun-dried Tomatoes

Mango and Black Bean Salad


week 2

Smokin' Barbecue Meatloaf

Basil-Parmesan Baked Snapper

Chinese Lo Mein Noodles with Asparagus

Crispy Tofu Triangles with Fried Rice

Spinach, Basil, and Red Pepper Wraps


week 3

Lemon-Pepper Pork Chops

Cornmeal-crusted Fish with Black Bean and Corn Salsa

Penne with Prosciutto and Goat Cheese

Chili Potatoes with Sweet Peppers

Earth Day Vegetable Stew with Feta Cheese


week 4

Ginger-Soy Flank Steak

Tilapia Packets with Fresh Herbs and Baby Spinach

Spaghetti Carbonara

Chipotle Bean and Corn Burritos

Mediterranean Quinoa Salad


week 5

Tandoori Chicken

Beef or Turkey Empanadas (Flaky Meat Pies)

Spice-tossed Shrimp with Parmesan Grits

Honey Sesame Spaghetti

Cream of Asparagus Soup with Fresh Croutons


poultry, pork, and beef

Lemon-Oregano Chicken* --------- Prep + Cook = 20 minutes

Crispy Parmesan-Panko Crusted Chicken Cutlets* ------- Prep + Cook = 20 minutes

Bacon-wrapped Chicken Strips with Orange-Dijon Sauce* --------- Prep + Cook = 30 minutes +

Chinese Chicken with Peanuts* --------- Prep + Cook = 20 minutes

Chicken Marsala with Mushrooms and Garlic* ----------- Prep + Cook = 30 minutes

Tandoori Chicken --------- Prep (10 min.) + Cook (25 min.) +

Baked Chicken Romano --------- Prep (20 min.) + Cook (30 min.)

Grilled Island Chicken ---------- Prep (10 min.) + Cook (10 min.) +

Mumbai Meatballs with Yogurt-Chutney Dipping Sauce (M) -------- Prep (10 min.) + Cook (25 min.)

Beef or Turkey Empanadas (Flaky Meat Pies) (V)(M) ------------- Prep (25 min.) + Cook (20 min.)

Smokin' Barbecue Meatloaf (M) --------- Prep (10 min.) + Cook (70 min.)

Lemon-Pepper Pork Chops* ---------- Prep + Cook = 20 minutes

Ginger-Soy Flank Steak -------- Prep + Cook = 25 minutes +

Sweet Glazed Corned Beef and Cabbage (M) ---------- Prep (10 min.) + Cook (210 min.)


fish

Indian Spiced Salmon* ---------- Prep + Cook = 20 minutes

Grilled Caramelized Ginger Salmon ---------- Prep (10 min.) + Cook (20 min.) +

Tilapia Packets with Fresh Herbs and Baby Spinach* ---------- Prep + Cook = 30 minutes

Basil-Parmesan Baked Snapper* ---------- Prep + Cook = 20 minutes

Cornmeal-crusted Fish with Black Bean and Corn Salsa* ---------- Prep + Cook = 30 minutes

Spice-tossed Shrimp with Parmesan Grits (V)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 10 minutes

Salmon Salad with Lemon and Dill (M)* ---------- Prep (no cook) = 15 minutes


pastas, grains, soups, and stews

Cool Tortellini with Artichokes and Pepperoni* ---------- Prep + Cook = 20 minutes

Ravioli with Spinach and Sun-dried Tomatoes (V)(M)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 25 minutes

Chinese Lo Mein Noodles with Asparagus (V)(M)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 30 minutes

Key: (V) = Vegetarian or vegetarian optional; * = Scramble Express: 30 minutes or less total; (M) = Make-ahead, freeze, or slow-cooker option

Orzo Salad with Peas and Feta Cheese (V)(M) ---------- Prep + Cook = 20 minutes +

Lemon-Parmesan Fusilli with Asparagus and Spinach (V)(M)* --------- Prep + Cook = 25 minutes

Celia's Simply Irresistible Spaghetti* ---------- Prep + Cook = 20 minutes

Pasta Primavera (V)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 25 minutes

Honey Sesame Spaghetti (V)(M)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 25 minutes

Solomon's Mushroom-Sausage Penne Pasta (V)(M)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 20 minutes

Penne with Prosciutto and Goat Cheese (V)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 30 minutes

Spaghetti Carbonara (V)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 25 minutes

Crispy Tofu Triangles with Fried Rice (V)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 30 minutes

Earth Day Vegetable Stew with Feta Cheese (V)(M) ---------- Prep (20 min.) + Cook (20 min.)

Cream of Asparagus Soup with Fresh Croutons (V)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 30 minutes

Speedy Quick Matzo Ball Soup (V)(M) ---------- Prep (20 min.) + Cook (30 min.)


sandwiches, wraps, salads, and other lighter fare

San Francisco Joes (V)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 15 minutes

Chili Potatoes with Sweet Peppers (V)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 30 minutes

Mandarin Tuna Roll-Ups* ---------- Prep (no cook) = 10 minutes

Chipotle Bean and Corn Burritos (V)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 15 minutes

Salmon Salad Sandwiches (M)* ---------- Prep (no cook) = 10 minutes

Tortilla Pepperoni Pizzas (V)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 20 minutes

Spinach, Basil, and Red Pepper Wraps (V)(M)* ---------- Prep (no cook) = 10 minutes

Easy-Cheesy Tex-Mex Scramble (V)* ---------- Prep +Cook = 10 minutes

Chips Olé (V)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 15 minutes

Spinach Pie with Portobello Mushrooms(V)(M) ---------- Prep (20 min.) + Cook (30–35 min.)

Mango and Black Bean Salad (V)(M)* ---------- Prep + Cook = 20 minutes

Mediterranean Quinoa Salad (V)(M) ---------- Prep + Cook = 20 minutes+

Key: (V) = Vegetarian or vegetarian optional; * = Scramble Express: 30 minutes or less total; (M) = Make-ahead, freeze, or slow-cooker option


spending our food dollars where they count — on local food!


SPRING IS IN THE AIR and with it the happy return of all those beautiful, fresh local vegetables. Farmers markets and produce stands reopen (at least those that close for the cool weather). Crisp asparagus and pungent, delicate arugula are as welcome and renewing as bright, blooming daffodils and tulips.

But is buying these locally grown foods an indulgence or a wise use of our food budget? Sometimes buying locally grown foods is more expensive, other times it is not. But for me the overall value is higher. The better quality, taste, and longer shelf life means less food waste and more nutritious fruits and vegetables in the bellies of our loved ones. I've found that I can also freeze in-season fruits and vegetables for an economical and ready source of produce.

I feel good about spending my food dollars to support local farms, where produce is usually grown with fewer, if any, pesticides, livestock is treated more humanely, transportation cost (and pollution) is reduced, and local farmers can support their families rather than having to sell their farm parcels to land developers. Patronizing these local markets also helps our children feel connected to the local community and the wonders of what springs from the earth.

By buying local produce, eggs, meats, and dairy products we make an investment in the health of our families, our communities, and our planet. And I can't think of any other way I'd like to spend my Saturday or Sunday mornings than connecting with the local farmers and their mouth-watering and eye-pleasing bounty.

happy spring!

This simple dish gives you a lot of flavor for just six ingredients and twenty minutes, and is a terrific dinner for a busy night (wait — isn't that every night?). Serve it with couscous, and asparagus (the ideal vegetable to help you celebrate the onset of spring!) with pine nuts.


lemon-oregano chicken

Prep + Cook = 20 minutes

4 servings

Nutritional Information per serving (% based upon daily values): Calories 310, Total Fat9g, 14%, Saturated Fat 1.5g, 8%, Cholesterol 130mg, 43%, Sodium 360mg, 15%, Total Carbohydrate 1g, 0%, Dietary Fiber 0g, 0%, Sugar 0g, Protein 53g

Nutritional Information per serving with side dish (% based upon daily values) 3/4 cup couscous prepared with water; 1 cup prepared asparagus: Calories: 520; Total Fat: 14g, 21%; Saturated Fat: 3g, 12%; Cholesterol: 130mg, 43%; Sodium: 546mg, 22%; Total Carbohydrate: 38g, 11%; Dietary Fiber: 6g, 21%; Sugar: 2g; Protein:62g

2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts

3 tablespoons olive oil

1/2–3/4 lemon, juice only (2 tablespoons juice)

3/4 teaspoon dried Oregano, or 2 teaspoons fresh

1 teaspoon minced garlic (about 2 cloves)

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Wrap the chicken breasts in plastic wrap and flatten them with a mallet to an even thickness. This allows them to cook more quickly and evenly. (Alternatively cut them into 1-inch pieces.)

Put the chicken (without the plastic wrap, of course) in a flat dish large enough to hold it in one layer. Drizzle 2 tablespoons of the oil, the lemon juice, oregano, garlic, and salt over it. Flip the chicken several times to coat it. (Meanwhile, start the asparagus and the couscous.)

In a large heavy skillet over medium heat, add the remaining oil. When the pan is hot, cook the chicken on the first side for 4 to 5 minutes until it is just starting to brown. Flip the chicken and partially cover the pan. Reduce the heat to medium-low, and continue cooking the chicken for 4 to 5 more minutes until it is just cooked through. Transfer the chicken to a cutting board and cut it into strips to serve it.

Scramble Flavor Booster: Marinate the chicken for at least 15 minutes and up to 2 hours. Season the chicken with freshly ground black pepper at the table, and serve it with lemon wedges.

Tip: When substituting fresh herbs for dry herbs in a recipe, the ratio I use is generally 3:1, or about 3 times the amount of fresh herbs as dried.

Side Dish suggestion: Prepare couscous according to package directions, using water or broth for the liquid. For even more flavor, stir fresh herbs, toasted pine nuts or slivered almonds, or dried cranberries or currants into the hot couscous.

Side Dish suggestion: To make asparagus with pine nuts, trim 1 bunch (about 1 pound) of asparagus and cut it in thirds. In a medium skillet, heat 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium heat. Add 2 tablespoons pine nuts and toast them in the oil for 1 to 2 minutes, stirring frequently, until they are lightly browned. Add the asparagus and stir-fry it for 3 to 5 minutes until it is tender-crisp. Season it with salt and black pepper to taste.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from SOS! The Six O'Clock Scramble to the Rescue by Aviva Goldfarb. Copyright © 2010 Aviva Goldfarb. Excerpted by permission of St. Martin's Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Meet the Author

Aviva Goldfarb is a mother of two and the author and founder of The Six O'Clock Scramble®, www.thescramble.com, an online weekly menu planner and cookbook (St. Martin's Press, 2006), and is author of the cookbook, SOS! The Six O'Clock Scramble to the Rescue: Earth Friendly, Kid-Pleasing Meals for Busy Families (St. Martin's Press, 2010).

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