S.O.S. Titanic

S.O.S. Titanic

4.1 54
by Eve Bunting
     
 

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Eve Bunting's gripping account of a immigrant teen passenger on the Titanic, based on the true and terrible events of exactly 100 years ago.  See more details below

Overview

Eve Bunting's gripping account of a immigrant teen passenger on the Titanic, based on the true and terrible events of exactly 100 years ago.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Dr. Judy Rowen
In his introduction, Dr. Darling defines science as observation, hypothesis and experimentation, and encourages children to ask lots of questions. Each experiment's step-by-step instructions run parallel to practical examples and an explanation of the phenomenon under investigation. The book is illustrated with drawings and full-color, stock photographs.1991, Dillon, Ages 10 up, $13.95. Reviewer: Beverly Kobrin
The ALAN Review - Nancy E. Zuwiyya
Bunting combines historical accounts of the sinking of the Titanic with the story of a fifteen-year-old Irish boy leaving home and grandparents to join his parents in America. It is April, 1912, and Barry O'Neill has mixed feelings about his departure from Ireland, especially when he learns that local ruffians with a grudge against his family are sailing in the steerage. Bunting weaves together the stories of Barry's girlfriend in the steerage, first-class companions, and inexorably the story of the tragic sinking of the Titanic. Careful attention to historical detail adds interest to this fast-paced novel, but the emphasis is definitely on narrative as the suspense builds. Bunting tells the story well, but her ability to set the scene, both in the beginning and at the end, when she describes the death of the ship itself, carries this fine novel beyond mere narrative into an unforgettable scene of death and survival. Harcourt Brace & Company,
School Library Journal
Gr 6-9Readers fascinated by the lore surrounding the sinking of the Titanic will likely enjoy this exciting, suspenseful, and romantic version of the tragedy. Fifteen-year-old Barry, a privileged, upper-class Irishman raised by his grandparents while his parents were off in China, is bound for America to join them at last. Class conflict comes aboard, too, in the form of Frank and Jonnie Flynn, who blame Barry's grandfather for their forced departure from Ireland via steerage. Frank's threats of revenge add a layer of fear to Barry's on-again, off-again relationship with their sister, Pegeen, as the plot steams steadily toward its inevitably icy climax. The final hundred pages of the book describe post-collision confusion that escalates toward chaos, including Barry's gallant attempt (in vain) to save Frank's life. He does succeed in saving Pegeen, and the two of them end up on the overturned inflatable life raft and are among those few rescued the next morning by the Carpathia. Lots of foreshadowing and hints of the supernatural (Watley, Barry's first-class steward, was born in a caul, which is said to have given him second sight) add interest, as does an interesting range of supporting characters.Joel Shoemaker, Southeast Jr. High School, Iowa City, IA
Debbie Carton
Fifteen-year-old Barry O'Neill is traveling from Ireland to New York on the "Titanic". He is heartsick about leaving the beloved grandparents who raised him for the last 10 years and apprehensive about rejoining his parents, who have been in China. He's also worried about the Flynn brothers, arch enemies traveling in steerage who have threatened to throw him overboard. Foreshadowing of impending disaster winds through the early narrative: a psychic steward tells Barry of visions, and a superstitious passenger counts and re-counts the lifeboats. What sets this tale apart from other recent novels about the disaster (for example, "Titanic Crossing" ) is Barry's growing awareness of the injustice of the class system that ultimately doomed most of the steerage passengers. With so many characters, most are reduced to a few identifying quirks, but Bunting accurately and dramatically describes the ship's sinking and, at the same time, immerses readers in the many human tragedies. Perfect for middle school, this fast-paced story will satisfy readers looking for the human element in the "Titanic"'s history.
From the Publisher
“A dread sense of the inevitable drives this taut disaster story-and makes it nearly impossible to put down.”  —Publishers Weekly 

"Readers fascinated by the lore surrounding the sinking of the Titanic will likely enjoy this exciting, suspenseful, and romantic version of the tragedy."—School Library Journal  

"Bunting accurately and dramatically describes the ship's sinking and, at the same time, immerses readers in the many human tragedies. . . . this fast-paced story will satisfy readers looking for the human element in the Titanic's history."—Booklist

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152002718
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
06/01/1996
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
4.19(w) x 6.88(h) x (d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
“A dread sense of the inevitable drives this taut disaster story-and makes it nearly impossible to put down.”  —Publishers Weekly 

"Readers fascinated by the lore surrounding the sinking of the Titanic will likely enjoy this exciting, suspenseful, and romantic version of the tragedy."—School Library Journal  

"Bunting accurately and dramatically describes the ship's sinking and, at the same time, immerses readers in the many human tragedies. . . . this fast-paced story will satisfy readers looking for the human element in the Titanic's history."—Booklist

Meet the Author

EVE BUNTING has written over two hundred books for children, including the Caldecott Medal-winning Smoky Night, illustrated by David Diaz, The Wall , Fly Away Home , and Train to Somewhere . She lives in Southern California.

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