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The Soul of Man Under Socialism
     

The Soul of Man Under Socialism

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by Oscar Wilde
 

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Sometimes inspiring, sometimes controversial, but always stimulating, Oscar Wilde's essay on socialism is a surprising contribution to nineteenth-century political thought. In veering away from the conventional meaning of socialism, he presents a view which is as much concerned with artistic creativity and individualism as it is with social justice. Following his

Overview

Sometimes inspiring, sometimes controversial, but always stimulating, Oscar Wilde's essay on socialism is a surprising contribution to nineteenth-century political thought. In veering away from the conventional meaning of socialism, he presents a view which is as much concerned with artistic creativity and individualism as it is with social justice. Following his conversion to anarchist philosophy after reading the works of Peter Kropotkin, Wilde's aesthetic, romantic approach fervently advances an idiosyncratic plea for personal freedom of expression. This new digital edition corrects a serious error of typographical style. Wilde's original article presents many phrases and sentences at key moments in his discourse IN ITALICS, which in subsequent editions were rendered in ordinary roman type, removing clarity and nuance from his writing. In this new edition the italics are restored.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940021957892
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
81 KB

Meet the Author

Oscar Fingall O'Flahertie Wills Wilde was born in Dublin in 1854. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin and Magdalen College, Oxford where, a disciple of Pater, he founded an aesthetic cult. In 1884 he married Constance Lloyd, and his two sons were born in 1885 and 1886.
His novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), and social comedies Lady Windermere's Fan (1892), A Woman of No Importance (1893), An Ideal Husband (1895), and The Importance of Being Earnest (1895), established his reputation. In 1895, following his libel action against the Marquess of Queesberry, Wilde was sentenced to two years' imprisonment for homosexual conduct, as a result of which he wrote The Ballad of Reading Gaol (1898), and his confessional letter De Profundis (1905). On his release from prison in 1897 he lived in obscurity in Europe, and died in Paris in 1900.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
October 16, 1854
Date of Death:
November 30, 1900
Place of Birth:
Dublin, Ireland
Place of Death:
Paris, France
Education:
The Royal School in Enniskillen, Dublin, 1864; Trinity College, Dublin, 1871; Magdalen College, Oxford, England, 1874

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The soul of man under socialism 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago