Soul Stories: Practical Guides to the Soul [NOOK Book]

Overview

True Stories That Transform Lives
Writing with profound psychological and spiritual insight, prize-winning author Gary Zukav has had a major impact on the consciousness of millions. In his New York Times number-one bestseller, The Seat of the Soul, he explained how the expansion of human perception beyond the five senses leads to a new understanding of power -- the alignment of the personality with the soul -- which in turn leads to an awareness of our extraordinary creative ...
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Soul Stories: Practical Guides to the Soul

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Overview

True Stories That Transform Lives
Writing with profound psychological and spiritual insight, prize-winning author Gary Zukav has had a major impact on the consciousness of millions. In his New York Times number-one bestseller, The Seat of the Soul, he explained how the expansion of human perception beyond the five senses leads to a new understanding of power -- the alignment of the personality with the soul -- which in turn leads to an awareness of our extraordinary creative abilities. Now, in one of the most important and useful books you will ever read, Soul Stories, Zukav shows how this new understanding of power -- authentic power -- transforms lives in countless ways.
Soul Stories is filled with marvelous stories that show how concepts such as intuition, harmony, cooperation, sharing, and reverence for life actually express themselves in people's lives. Best of all, the stories lead to practical advice on how you can discover your own Soul Stories and the truths they reveal about the deepest sources of your being. Wonderfully readable, Soul Stories is a wise and inspirational book.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Gary Zukav is a great advocate for the power of intuition, or multisensory perception, as he prefers to call it. It gives you a new perspective, he says: "Nothing seems accidental. Everything has a purpose, and that purpose is to help you grow spiritually." Each of the 52 true stories in Soul Stories, which read like little parables, illustrate the power of multisensory perception, clarity, and reverence for life to transform the ordinary. Readers who have discovered Zukav via Oprah or his bestseller The Seat of the Soul will certainly enjoy an advanced seminar with this book.
Library Journal
Zukav (The Seat of the Soul), a frequent guest on Oprah, here presents accounts of people who exercise their intuitive power. Their ability and willingness to do this marks them as being "multisensory" and seems to show them as higher beings in the scheme of evolution. This sounds vague, but then Zukav's concepts can seem somewhat abstract. Many of the stories themselves are really quite nice and greatly appeal to one's sentiments. The author has a certain enthusiasm in his narration, but the overall delivery is somewhat monotonous. Public libraries with a large Oprah following and/or those with active spirituality/alternative religion collections will want to consider this work.--Michael T. Fein, Central Virginia Community Coll., Lynchburg Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416561989
  • Publisher: Free Press
  • Publication date: 5/21/2007
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 156,504
  • File size: 281 KB

Meet the Author

Gary Zukav is the author of The Dancing Wu Li Masters: An Overview of the New Physics, winner of The American Book Award for Science; The Seat of the Soul, the celebrated #1 New York Times bestseller; Soul Stories, also a New York Times bestseller; and many others. His books have sold millions of copies and are published in twenty-four languages. He is a graduate of Harvard University and a former US Army Special Forces (Green Beret) officer with Vietnam service. He lives in Oregon with his spiritual partner, Linda Francis.
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Read an Excerpt

Multisensory Perception

It was a gray winter afternoon. The black, sleek car was traveling fifty miles an hour when it hit the ice. Like a graceful dancer, it began a slow, horizontal pirouette as it slid toward a steep embankment and then disappeared over it. Inside, a young woman screamed as the car rolled again and again like a ball careening downward and spinning at the same time. That woman was my sister.

One hundred miles away, an older woman with gray hair suddenly rose out of her chair.

"Something has happened to Gail!" she gasped.

The telephone rang forty minutes later.

"Your daughter has been in an accident. She is not hurt badly, but her car was destroyed."

How could this have happened? The woman who rose in alarm, my mother, could not see her daughter struggling for her life as the car crashed again and again against the frozen ground and, at last, into a barren tree. She could not smell the crushed bushes beneath the battered car, or the gasoline from the ruptured tank. She could not hear the bending of metal and the shattering of glass, feel the impact of the car as it tumbled, or taste the blood in her daughter's mouth.

She did not have to. She used multisensory perception. Multisensory perception is a direct link with information that the five senses cannot provide. It eliminates the distance between the one who knows and what she knows. It eliminates the time between them. My mother did not need to wait for the police to tell her that her daughter's life had been in danger. She knew it as clearly as if she had watched, heard, smelled, felt, and tasted the experience herself. She engaged another way of knowing.

The businessman was late for his plane. He waited impatiently for his ticket, and then drove quickly into the huge airport garage. The first level was full. So was the second. Up and up he spiraled, one narrow ramp after the other, becoming more worried each moment. Level three was full, and so was level four. As he approached the ramp to the last level, desperate now, he suddenly stopped. A large sedan came speeding around the curve, going the wrong way. Neither would have seen the other before the crash.

How did he know that car was coming? He could not see it, hear it, or smell it. His ability to taste and touch could not help him. This is also an example of multisensory perception. Multi means more than one. Taste, touch, smell, hearing, and sight are different ways of sensing, but they are all part of a single system. That system is designed to detect one thing -- the world that appears to be outside of you. If you only have five senses to navigate, you are limited to this system.

When the brochure first came in the mail, the woman did not give it much attention. It was about a conference that was too far away, too expensive, and not about the things that were most interesting to her. The next day, she felt an impulse to read it again, and the next day, too. She could not put it out of her mind, nor the curious feeling that she should attend. Without knowing why, she registered and booked a flight. The first day there she met a man who was struggling with cancer. She had a passionate interest in the healing process. With her assistance, his cancer disappeared, and they coauthored a book on healing.

Where did her impulse come from? She had two systems to provide her with information. The first -- her five senses -- didn't give her information about what might happen at the conference. Another system did. That second system is multisensory perception.

My friend Jeffrey had come to a dead end. He wanted to study "deviant personalities" from a positive point of view -- what makes some people more fulfilled and happy than others. His graduate program in criminology only studied them from a negative point of view -- what makes some people more violent than others. One night he dreamed that he visited the house of two friends (whom he actually knew). They were not home, so he let himself in. On a table in the living room he found a magazine called Eye. It told him exactly what he needed to know.

The next morning, he hurried to tell his friends about this dream. They weren't home. He knew where they kept the key, so he let himself in, although he had never done that before. On a table in the living room he found a magazine called Focus, which included a schedule of programs on a national public television station. As he looked through it, he suddenly realized that he could study positive "deviant personalities" by interviewing them on television! He did just that. He called his program "Thinking Allowed."

Jeffrey's dream told him how to find what he needed. So did the woman's impulse to go to the conference. The businessman's hunch told him what he needed to avoid. These are examples of multisensory perception. Jeffrey, the woman, and the businessman listened to their multisensory perception. That is why Jeffrey has his television program, the woman is the coauthor of a book, and the businessman stayed out of the hospital.

Having multisensory perception and using it to help you are different things. This is important to realize because we are all becoming multisensory. If you understand that, you will be looking for ways to use this ability. Actually, this ability is not new. What is new is that everyone is now getting it.

In the past, we called this ability by another name.

Copyright © 2000 by Gary Zukav
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Table of Contents


Contents

Introduction

Part I

What's New

Multisensory Perception

Intuition

Using Intuition

Nonphysical Teachers

Nonphysical Reality

Your Soul

The Earth School

Reincarnation

A Higher Form of Reasoning I

A Higher Form of Reasoning II

A Higher Form of Reasoning and Justice

Part II

How It Works

Emotional Awareness

Responsible Choice

Intention

Harmony

Cooperation

Sharing

Reverence for Life

Authentic Power

Creating Authentic Power

Forgiveness

Humbleness

Clarity

Love

Trust

Part III

What It Looks Like

The Old Male

The Old Female

Marriage

The New Female

Old Male Meets New Female -- Version I

Old Male Meets New Female -- Version II

The New Male

Old Female Meets New Male -- Version I

Old Female Meets New Male -- Version II

A New Way of Relating

Spiritual Partnership

What About Marriage?

How Long?

Psychic Archaeology

Trust

Part IV

How It Happens

Children

Spiritual Partners

Earth Suits

Active Kindness

Reaching Out

Inner Richness

Perfect Trust

Love

Universal Humans

Elegant Spirits

Sacred Tasks

Coming Home
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First Chapter

Multisensory Perception

It was a gray winter afternoon. The black, sleek car was traveling fifty miles an hour when it hit the ice. Like a graceful dancer, it began a slow, horizontal pirouette as it slid toward a steep embankment and then disappeared over it. Inside, a young woman screamed as the car rolled again and again like a ball careening downward and spinning at the same time. That woman was my sister.

One hundred miles away, an older woman with gray hair suddenly rose out of her chair.

"Something has happened to Gail!" she gasped.

The telephone rang forty minutes later.

"Your daughter has been in an accident. She is not hurt badly, but her car was destroyed."

How could this have happened? The woman who rose in alarm, my mother, could not see her daughter struggling for her life as the car crashed again and again against the frozen ground and, at last, into a barren tree. She could not smell the crushed bushes beneath the battered car, or the gasoline from the ruptured tank. She could not hear the bending of metal and the shattering of glass, feel the impact of the car as it tumbled, or taste the blood in her daughter's mouth.

She did not have to. She used multisensory perception. Multisensory perception is a direct link with information that the five senses cannot provide. It eliminates the distance between the one who knows and what she knows. It eliminates the time between them. My mother did not need to wait for the police to tell her that her daughter's life had been in danger. She knew it as clearly as if she had watched, heard, smelled, felt, and tasted the experience herself. She engaged another way of knowing.


The businessman was late for his plane. He waited impatiently for his ticket, and then drove quickly into the huge airport garage. The first level was full. So was the second. Up and up he spiraled, one narrow ramp after the other, becoming more worried each moment. Level three was full, and so was level four. As he approached the ramp to the last level, desperate now, he suddenly stopped. A large sedan came speeding around the curve, going the wrong way. Neither would have seen the other before the crash.

How did he know that car was coming? He could not see it, hear it, or smell it. His ability to taste and touch could not help him. This is also an example of multisensory perception. Multi means more than one. Taste, touch, smell, hearing, and sight are different ways of sensing, but they are all part of a single system. That system is designed to detect one thing %151; the world that appears to be outside of you. If you only have five senses to navigate, you are limited to this system.


When the brochure first came in the mail, the woman did not give it much attention. It was about a conference that was too far away, too expensive, and not about the things that were most interesting to her. The next day, she felt an impulse to read it again, and the next day, too. She could not put it out of her mind, nor the curious feeling that she should attend. Without knowing why, she registered and booked a flight. The first day there she met a man who was struggling with cancer. She had a passionate interest in the healing process. With her assistance, his cancer disappeared, and they coauthored a book on healing.

Where did her impulse come from? She had two systems to provide her with information. The first %151; her five senses %151; didn't give her information about what might happen at the conference. Another system did. That second system is multisensory perception.


My friend Jeffrey had come to a dead end. He wanted to study "deviant personalities" from a positive point of view %151; what makes some people more fulfilled and happy than others. His graduate program in criminology only studied them from a negative point of view %151; what makes some people more violent than others. One night he dreamed that he visited the house of two friends (whom he actually knew). They were not home, so he let himself in. On a table in the living room he found a magazine called Eye. It told him exactly what he needed to know.

The next morning, he hurried to tell his friends about this dream. They weren't home. He knew where they kept the key, so he let himself in, although he had never done that before. On a table in the living room he found a magazine called Focus, which included a schedule of programs on a national public television station. As he looked through it, he suddenly realized that he could study positive "deviant personalities" by interviewing them on television! He did just that. He called his program "Thinking Allowed."

Jeffrey's dream told him how to find what he needed. So did the woman's impulse to go to the conference. The businessman's hunch told him what he needed to avoid. These are examples of multisensory perception. Jeffrey, the woman, and the businessman listened to their multisensory perception. That is why Jeffrey has his television program, the woman is the coauthor of a book, and the businessman stayed out of the hospital.

Having multisensory perception and using it to help you are different things. This is important to realize because we are all becoming multisensory. If you understand that, you will be looking for ways to use this ability. Actually, this ability is not new. What is new is that everyone is now getting it.

In the past, we called this ability by another name.

Copyright © 2000 by Gary Zukav

Read More Show Less

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2001

    An Invisible but Real Dimension!

    Gary Zukav has found a better medium for explaining his beliefs. Stories have been the best way to explain every idea since the beginning of time. I have also reviewed Gary Zukav¿s The Seat of the Soul in detail and reading that review may be helpful in understanding the premise behind Soul Stories. In The Seat of the Soul he explains his basic beliefs and goes into detail about authentic empowerment and how to reach beyond our five senses to become a multisensory person. Throughout Soul Stories, he also promotes the belief that the Universe is alive. To me, this is the presence of God in our lives. Gary discusses intuition, forms of reasoning, the earth school, emotional awareness, responsible choice, harmony, cooperation, sharing, reverence for life, forgiveness, love, trust, marriage, children, kindness and inner richness. It is not surprising that he also includes some health advice¯our souls do live in our bodies¯so why not create a perfect environment for the soul? We are individual souls sent to earth to fulfill a task or to learn a lesson, which will benefit us in the next life. Yes, I agree that you make your own future through making daily choices and when you have an ¿intention¿ you can create a good or bad experience. This book is a blending of Eastern religions with a generous helping of real experiences and a pinch of Christianity. I recommend that if you purchase this book and take this soul journey that you turn on your intuition, logic and perception. Be aware that although there are many truths in many religions, the ultimate truth comes from God. To know truth you must first know God. Gary has done an excellent job in raising awareness of the need to nurture our souls, however he has combined many religions into one book. It is up to us to find our own way on this journey. God created our souls; and therefore he can lead us on the path to Truth. If you are searching to find out what Gary Zukav believes, then this book is very enlightening in that regard. I think his best idea is to view life as a school and that we are here to learn. I also appreciate his encouragement to make the best decision in each moment of our lives. He has changed my life in that regard! I started reviewing because I wanted everyone to know what his books said. I first saw him on Ophrah.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2001

    great author

    what a wonderful author..with a wonderful message..

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2001

    Its time to turn the TV off..

    This book was given to me as a birthday gift. I really feel for the first time I know what life is about and my place in this world. I have found a book I wish to share with everyone. I think I can say you will not be the same after you read this book.

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    Posted February 25, 2010

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    Posted January 1, 2010

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    Posted May 18, 2011

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