Soul to Soul: The Story of a Black Russian American Family, 1865-1992

Overview

On February 21, 1991, twenty-nine-year-old Yelena Khanga, born and raised in Moscow, bent down and grasped a handful of rich, cotton-growing delta soil in Yazoo County, Mississippi. A century ago, this piece of earth had belonged to her great-grandfather, Hilliard Golden, a former slave who became the largest black landowner in Yazoo after the Civil War. On Thanksgiving Day of that year, at the Long Island home of her cousin Albert Bialek, Yelena, also the great-granddaughter of a Warsaw rabbi, reclaimed another ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (26) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $9.94   
  • Used (23) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$9.94
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(1613)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
New

Ships from: Fort Worth, TX

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$11.39
Seller since 2013

Feedback rating:

(41)

Condition: New
Hardcover New 0393034046 FAST shipping. New Unread Book.

Ships from: FORT LAUDERDALE, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$60.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(151)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

On February 21, 1991, twenty-nine-year-old Yelena Khanga, born and raised in Moscow, bent down and grasped a handful of rich, cotton-growing delta soil in Yazoo County, Mississippi. A century ago, this piece of earth had belonged to her great-grandfather, Hilliard Golden, a former slave who became the largest black landowner in Yazoo after the Civil War. On Thanksgiving Day of that year, at the Long Island home of her cousin Albert Bialek, Yelena, also the great-granddaughter of a Warsaw rabbi, reclaimed another piece of her past. Members of Yelena's other American family raised their glasses in a salute to Yelena and her mother, "who have brought beauty, spice, and a new color into our lives." Soul to Soul is a four-generation family story that unfolds across 125 years and three continents - from nineteenth-century Mississippi cotton fields to immigrant Jewish New York and Harlem in the 1920s; from a Soviet Union crushed by Stalin's dictatorship to today's emerging, hoped-for democratic Russia; from Los Angeles to London to the birthplace of Yelena's father, the island of Zanzibar. This is also a great love story, and a story of rejection. Bertha Bialek, the author's grandmother, entered America through Ellis Island in 1920. In a New York jailhouse, after a union demonstration, she met Oliver Golden, an agronomist and former student of George Washington Carver. When the two fell in love and decided to marry, most of Bertha's family disowned her for loving a black man. The couple soon realized that their love could not be accepted in the United States. Disillusioned also by American racial prejudices and fired by political idealism, Oliver Golden led a group of black agricultural specialists to the USSR, to help build a socialist future. There in Uzbekistan, in the central Asian city of Tashkent, Yelena Khanga's mother, Lily, was born, to live a Russian life. When Oliver died at the age of 53, Bertha was left to raise her daughter alone in a country where the g

As the Soviet Union crumbled in early 1991, a young Russian woman in search of her past found her way to Mississippi, to the rich cotton land where her great-grandfather, a former slave, had become the largest black landowner in Yazoo County. In this extraordinary memoir, we share the life and family legacy of the Khangas over four generations and three continents. 32 pages of photos.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
With freelance writer Jacoby, Russian journalist Khanga offers a competent account of an unusual heritage. Her maternal grandparents were American Communists who in 1931 moved from New York City to Soviet Uzbekistan to develop a cotton industry: her grandfather, Oliver Golden, was black and the son of a slave; and her grandmother, Warsaw-born Bertha Bialek Golden, was the Jewish daughter of a Hebrew-school teacher and garment worker. Khanga's mother, Lily Golden, became the first scholar at the African Institute of the Soviet Academy of Sciences, which Khrushchev created at the suggestion of Golden family friend W.E.B. Du Bois. Khanga's father, Abdullah, was an African independence leader who treated Lily like a traditional Muslim wife, locking her inside the home when he went out; in 1965 he was assassinated by political opponents in his native Zanzibar. Khanga describes the pitfalls of growing up in white, anti-American Soviet society, her reporting stints at a Moscow News revolutionized by glasnost and her work as an exchange journalist at the Christian Science Monitor in Boston. In America, she travels the country and finds her Bialek and Golden relatives. She is opinionated about American racism and reactions to African Americans, but, given her dual heritage, her treatments of African American anti-Semitism and American Jewry are curiously cursory. Photos not seen by PW. (Oct.)
Donna Seaman
Glasnost and the break-up of the Soviet Union have changed the lives of millions of people, but few can match the cross-cultural drama and revelation freedom has brought Yelena Khanga. A young, black journalist, Yelena describes herself as "Russian to the core," yet she has always been different, always separate because of her complex, foreign heritage and dark skin. For most of her life in Tashkent and Moscow, the only other black woman Yelena knew was her mother. Once she was able to visit the U.S., a buried part of her soul was finally defined and connected. Khanga's unusual family history is a microcosm of twentieth-century politics and cultural issues. Oliver Golden, her maternal grandfather, was an African American agronomist, the great-grandson of a slave turned landowner. Her maternal grandmother, Bertha Bialek, was a Polish Jew who had immigrated to America 10 years before she met Oliver in 1927; she was disowned by her family for loving a black man. American Communists, they moved to the Soviet Union to be free of segregation and discrimination. Their daughter, Lily, Yelena's mother, married a politician from Zanzibar, but he was murdered while Yelena was still an infant. So Yelena was raised by her white, widowed grandmother and her black, widowed mother. With magnetic grace and candor, Khanga describes the experience of growing up black in white Soviet Russia, with no access to reliable information about Americans, especially African Americans. Now that she's lived in both cultures, Khanga is eloquent on the subject of Russian and American forms of racism, anti-Semitism, and sexism and able to characterize the mental habits of prejudice with unfailing veracity. Hers is a remarkable tale of the cyclic nature of history and the enduring value of integrity, pride, and love.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393034042
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/1/1992
  • Pages: 416
  • Product dimensions: 6.37 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 1.23 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)