The Sound and the Fury (Norton Critical Editions Series) / Edition 2

The Sound and the Fury (Norton Critical Editions Series) / Edition 2

4.1 108
by William Faulkner
     
 

ISBN-10: 0393964817

ISBN-13: 9780393964813

Pub. Date: 12/28/1993

Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.

The text of this Norton Critical Edition is that of the corrected edition scrupulously prepared by Noel Polk, whose textual note precedes the text. David Minter’s annotations are designed to assist the reader with obscure words and allusions.
"Backgrounds" begins with the appendix Faulkner wrote in 1945 and sometimes referred to as another telling of The…  See more details below

Overview

The text of this Norton Critical Edition is that of the corrected edition scrupulously prepared by Noel Polk, whose textual note precedes the text. David Minter’s annotations are designed to assist the reader with obscure words and allusions.
"Backgrounds" begins with the appendix Faulkner wrote in 1945 and sometimes referred to as another telling of The Sound and the Fury and includes a selection of Faulkner’s letters, excerpts from two Faulkner interviews, a memoir by Faulknerís friend Ben Wasson, and both versions of Faulkner's 1933 introduction to the novel. "Cultural and Historical Contexts" presents four different perspectives on the place of the American South in history. Taken together, these works—by C. Vann Woodward, Richard H. King, Carolyn Porter, and Robert Penn Warren—provide the reader with valuable contexts for understanding the novel. "Criticism" includes seventeen essays on The Sound and the Fury that collectively trace changes in the way we have viewed this novel over the last four decades. The critics are Jean-Paul Sartre, Irving Howe, Ralph Ellison, Olga W. Vickery, Cleanth Brooks, Michael Millgate, John T. Irwin, Myra Jehlen, Donald M. Kartiganer, David Minter, Warwick Wadlington, John T. Matthews, Thadious M. Davis, Wesley Morris and Barbara Alverson Morris, Minrose C. Gwin, André Bleikasten, and Philip M. Weinstein. A revised Selected Bibliography is also included.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393964813
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
12/28/1993
Series:
Norton Critical Editions Series
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
464
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
14 - 18 Years

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The Sound and the Fury 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 108 reviews.
McCarthy92 More than 1 year ago
William Fauklner's forth novel and considered by many to be his masterpeice, The Sound and the fury is an absolute great read. A Challenging yet rewarding book, the novel contains 4 chapters, each narrarated by 4 different speakers, the three Compson brothers and the fourth is told in third-person. The First chapter is told by the mentally retarded benjy. The Second is told by the sad elder-child Quentin, and the third told by the mean and selfish Jason. many consider benjy's chapter to be the most difficult, however, I found the chapter a lot easier than Quentin to be much more difficult. The last 2 chapters were very simple. One of the best books I have ever read I would recommend reading SparkNotes for a litle aid if you are new to these harder and more rewarding works of fiction.
Guest More than 1 year ago
William Faulkner brilliantly tells the inherent evil in the ignorance that humans establish in life through the Compson family. The setting takes place in the South where one family will not change from their slave driven ways causing the downfall and torture of every member. You will see the consequences of evil ways through: Caddy, the beautiful yet tragically promiscuous daughter. Benjy, the mentally retarded manchild who can't grow up Quentin, the suicidal son who is tortured with the realization of the evil that exists within his family Jason, the posessor of this inherent evil that has been passed down through his family This book is one that captures the truth of what ignorance can truly cause. It is dark novel that gives but a glimpse to what the humans can possess. This novel is one that I only hope everyone takes the time to read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have read this book, and Faulkner's ability to use the thoughts of others and to incorporate them into the story. Some say that this story is babble, but they can't understand that this story was written in the early 1900s. Faulkner had his own way of starting and ending a story. It's brilliant dialogue and cultural visions, give us a glimpse into the life of a family in the South during the times of racism and slavery.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One of the highest heights reached in American literature. Let the English lit professors argue about modernism's relevance. This is a profound story told in a complex and powerful way. Faulkner's powers are at their peak in his masterpiece. This is not an easy read at first, especially for those unaccustomed to the non-linear storytelling style of modernism. The story's multiple points of perspective may also be initially confusing. The end result though makes the journey worth the undertaking.
christian2795 More than 1 year ago
I can only speculate as to the overall quality of the review to follow, as I have only read this book once. This is one that, after I set it down and thought about for a week, replaying key scenes and revisiting key images in my mind, I desired greatly to read again. But I didn't; I went ahead and read two other Faulkner novels, those being 'Light in August' and 'As I Lay Dying'. I found that I could not get enough of the man's work, because as a writer and something of a closet aesthete, I fell in love with his brilliant style, with its fluctuating regard for proper punctuation and its haunting stream-of-consciousness passages. I became intrigued by his characters and by the way they functioned and thought and failed. No book has altered the way that I think more than this one. This is one that remains always in the back of my mind even now, three months after completing it. I have never physically been to the South, but after reading this and two of his other novels, I feel that I know it much better than if I had simply gone and stayed in Mississippi for a week, having been taken there mentally, having felt the overwhelming hubris, impotency and humanity of the Compson family. One gets the feeling, reading through 'The Sound and the Fury', that Faulkner has tossed proper method out the window, leaving us only with the madness. I can only say that it is a madness well worth experiencing multiple times (in fact, it demands it), and that I shall be returning to it shortly.  
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Because this book is a classic, I wanted to like it very much. I found the characters really hard to follow and the book itself to be a little confusing. Overall, it is a good read, just not my favorite.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book for an english project and ended up loving it. The beginning section seems at first an insurmountable obstacle, but the further you get into it the better it gets. This novel is a profound exploration of human nature that captivates the diligent reader.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This might be the best book I have ever read. For anyone bold enough to pick it up, I highly recommend it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I would recommend that you read The Sound and the Fury it is a great book that shows you how society was back in the early 1900's. It shows how people were treated because of race or disabilites. This book will teach you to have a better view of the way the south was and also how people lived in day to day life. It also will show you how people can just cast out thei8r own family members and how people can be very decitful. I strongly recommend that you read this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A simply beautiful piece of literature.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Arguably the most difficult book I have ever read, but also one of my all time favorites.  Faulkner himself acknowledged how difficult the book was to read when he originally requested having different text colors for the characters.
Book-touched More than 1 year ago
The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner is purported to be the sixth greatest English language novel of the 20th Century. It spins a tale about the travails of the Compson family of Mississippi from the late 1800’s to early 1900’s. It is divided into four books each of which is narrated by one of three Compson brothers, the fourth by Faulkner himself. Two of the main female characters Caddy, the Compson brother’s sister and Dilsey, the African American family servant though central to the story are interestingly not given narratives, perhaps symbolic of their disenfranchisement during this time period. To me the book is a series of puzzle pieces. The first book or puzzle piece is the most challenging as it is Benji’s perceptions, memories and feelings. Benji is mentally disabled, his narratives are disjointed and extremely challenging to read, yet they depict what Benji must have perceived his world to be thus giving the reader a glimpse into that world. Each narrative/book thereafter provides additional pieces to the puzzle as events surrounding this family’s story slowly unfold. It is a very dark book with little splashes of tenderness and great writing for relief. Beware this is not light reading for an afternoon’s pleasure. It requires patience, study and research; however, if you enjoy solving puzzles, theorizing and challenging your mind this may be the book for you. Be prepared to forget a linear chronology of events this one jumps from different points in time to different points of view. There was an addendum in the edition I read which explained the family’s history that I wish I had read first for context. The book is fertile ground to formulate your own interpretations thus providing the final puzzle pieces yourself. I used a reading guide to help me test my theories and keep myself on track. Overall, I enjoyed the challenge, read it and see what you think!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the book that made me love Faulkner.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If nothing else, one must appreciate the artfullness and craft that Faulkner exhibits in this masterpiece. Those whom rate it poorly must not be avid readers or lack the patience and open mind that reading classics sometimes requires. I admit that it was confusing to keep up with it at first, given the fact that the first chapter is from the perspective and thought process of Benjy, a retarded sibling of the Compson family, but as the book progesses, so does the solidity and apparent interconnectedness of the novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesome
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