×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Sound Clash: Jamaican Dancehall Culture at Large / Edition 1
     

Sound Clash: Jamaican Dancehall Culture at Large / Edition 1

by C. Cooper
 

See All Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 1403964246

ISBN-13: 9781403964243

Pub. Date: 10/12/2004

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan US

Megawattage sound systems have blasted the electronically-enhanced riddims and tongue-twisting lyrics of Jamaica's dancehall DJs across the globe. This high-energy raggamuffin music is often dismissed by old-school roots reggae fans as a raucous degeneration of classic Jamaican popular music. In this provocative study of dancehall culture, Cooper offers a sympathetic

Overview

Megawattage sound systems have blasted the electronically-enhanced riddims and tongue-twisting lyrics of Jamaica's dancehall DJs across the globe. This high-energy raggamuffin music is often dismissed by old-school roots reggae fans as a raucous degeneration of classic Jamaican popular music. In this provocative study of dancehall culture, Cooper offers a sympathetic account of the philosophy of a wide range of dancehall DJs: Shabba Ranks, Lady Saw, Ninjaman, Capleton, Buju Banton, Anthony B and Apache Indian. Cooper also demonstrates the ways in which the language of dancehall culture, often devalued as mere 'noise,' articulates a complex understanding of the border clashes which characterize Jamaican society, and analyzes the sound clashes that erupt in the movement of Jamaican dancehall culture across national borders.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781403964243
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan US
Publication date:
10/12/2004
Edition description:
2004
Pages:
348
Product dimensions:
5.51(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.03(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction: Word, Sound & Power Border Clash: Sites of Contestation Slackness Personified: Representations of Female Sexuality in the Lyrics of Bob Marley and Shabba Ranks Lady Saw Cuts Loose: Female Fertility Rituals in the Dancehall 'Mama, is That You?': Erotic Disguise in the Films Dancehall Queen and Babymother 'Lyrical Gun': Metaphor and Role-Play in Dancehall Culture 'More Fire': Chanting Down Babylon from Bob Marley to Capleton 'Vile Vocals': Exporting Jamaican Dancehall Lyrics to Barbados Hip-Hopping Across Cultures: Reggae to Rap and Back Mix up the Indian with all the Patwa: Rajamuffin Sounds in Cool Britannia The Dancehall Transnation: Language, Literature and Global Jamaica

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews