Sound Clash / Edition 1

Sound Clash / Edition 1

by Carolyn Cooper
     
 

Megawattage sound systems have blasted the electronically enhanced riddims and tongue-twisting lyrics of Jamaica's dancehall DJs across the globe. This high-energy raggamuffin music is often dissed by old-school roots reggae fans as a raucous degeneration of classic Jamaican popular music. In this provocative study of dancehall culture Carolyn Cooper,

See more details below

Overview

Megawattage sound systems have blasted the electronically enhanced riddims and tongue-twisting lyrics of Jamaica's dancehall DJs across the globe. This high-energy raggamuffin music is often dissed by old-school roots reggae fans as a raucous degeneration of classic Jamaican popular music. In this provocative study of dancehall culture Carolyn Cooper, Professor of Literary and Cultural Studies at the University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica, offers a sympathetic account of the philosophy of a wide range of dancehall DJs: Shabba Ranks, Lady Saw, Ninjaman, Capleton, Buju Banton, Anthony B, Apache Indian. She demonstrates the ways in which the language of dancehall culture, often devalued as mere 'noise,' articulates a complex understanding of the border clashes that characterise Jamaican society. Cooper also analyses the sound clashes that erupt in the movement of Jamaican dancehall culture across national borders.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781403964243
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Publication date:
09/01/2004
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
368
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.80(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction: Word, Sound & Power
Border Clash: Sites of Contestation
Slackness Personified: Representations of Female Sexuality in the Lyrics of Bob Marley and Shabba Ranks
Lady Saw Cuts Loose: Female Fertility Rituals in the Dancehall
'Mama, is That You?': Erotic Disguise in the Films Dancehall Queen and Babymother
'Lyrical Gun': Metaphor and Role-Play in Dancehall Culture
'More Fire': Chanting Down Babylon from Bob Marley to Capleton
'Vile Vocals': Exporting Jamaican Dancehall Lyrics to Barbados
Hip-Hopping Across Cultures: Reggae to Rap and Back
Mix up the Indian with all the Patwa: Rajamuffin Sounds in Cool Britannia
The Dancehall Transnation: Language, Literature and Global Jamaica

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >