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Sounding Off
     

Sounding Off

by Ted Staunton
 

Sounding Off is award-winning children's author Ted Staunton's 24th book, and his first for a young adult audience. Featuring the town of Hope Springs, home of his popular Monkey Mountain novels and Hope Springs a Leak, Sounding Off is a skillfully woven account of the farces and foibles of a community that could be found anywhere in

Overview

Sounding Off is award-winning children's author Ted Staunton's 24th book, and his first for a young adult audience. Featuring the town of Hope Springs, home of his popular Monkey Mountain novels and Hope Springs a Leak, Sounding Off is a skillfully woven account of the farces and foibles of a community that could be found anywhere in Canada.

Sam Foster is every teenager struggling to find out who he is and what his place is in the world. He is entering Grade 9, his first year of high school, filled with the usual worries: he's tall and gawky, he's constantly embarrassed, he tends to fall in love (or lust) with the nearest female. He wishes he were invisible-yet, somehow, he keeps being thrust into the spotlight.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Wry and amusing view of a teenage boy's world."

-- Books in Canada

"Ted Staunton captures many aspects of the unpredictability of adolescence."

-- Resource Links

"Throughout the novel, Staunton once again demonstrates his facility with age-appropriate humor."

-- CM Magazine

"Staunton has created an authentic story of teen angst, complete with the worries of adolescence and the humour that will have readers laughing out loud."

-- Brandon This Week

"Sounding Off is a fun read with enough realism to completely resonate with your own gawky teen."

-- The Telegram

KLIATT
Sam's an unlucky teen. Not only is his father the drama teacher in the high school Sam must attend, Sam is also in love with an unreachable female singer. His best friend, soon to be former, does things like wedging motorcycle helmets onto Sam's head. And then there's the rest of school, with its pitfalls, oddballs, and characters, as if being a teenager wasn't enough trouble and torture. Poor Sam has his hands full and no way to lighten the load. He's six-two and weighs in at only 130 lbs—a real standout, an idea no 14-year-old relishes. He finds himself in the land of Lost, which to him is somewhere between Love and Lust, and can't find a way out. He gets roped into being a part of a band led by his father that includes adults—one of whom is a cross-dresser. All of it turns his budding adolescence into a minor nightmare. Though this book can feel a bit episodic, it has its charms and Sam is a teen with whom YAs would identify. The writing is accessible and enjoyable. KLIATT Codes: J—Recommended for junior high school students. 2004, Red Deer Press, Northern Lights, 215p., Ages 12 to 15.
—Joseph DeMarco
VOYA
Sam is in love with Madison Dakota, a mysterious singer who makes J. D. Salinger look outgoing and personable. He also is being called upon to champion Dutch Courage, the latest bit of required reading to be called into question at school. But the book is legitimately lame. And when his band breaks up-not that they were all that good in the first place-by sheer coincidence, his father's longtime band also appears to be on its last legs. Dad is looking to join forces. Add a stolen kiss in the dark, a best friend who is acting more and more like a jerk, and an epic chase after a parrot, and the result is that it looks as if Sam has more going against him than Romeo and Juliet. Quirky characters and just the right hint of attitude make for an engaging read, as Staunton takes the usual trappings of the young adult genre and upends them in this good-natured offering. The plot lines themselves do not appear to be anything unique, but Staunton serves them all up with a twist. It should be apparent from the beginning that readers are in less-traveled waters when hero Sam is forced to spend the opening chapters with his head stuck in a crash helmet, olive oil dripping down his neck. It's good stuff, and Staunton plays out what could be everyday YA melodrama with energizing dashes of humor and spice. VOYA CODES: 4Q 4P M J S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Broad general YA appeal; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2004, Red Deer Press, 215p., Trade pb. Ages 11 to 18.
—Matthew Weaver

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780889952935
Publisher:
Fitzhenry & Whiteside, Limited
Publication date:
06/11/2004
Pages:
184
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.70(d)
Lexile:
730L (what's this?)
Age Range:
12 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

Ted Staunton is a Red Deer Press author.

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