4.5 11
by Linda Eder

Soundtrack finds Linda Eder musically "going to the movies" with a carefully selected set of songs from films that span five decades ('60s: Help, Charade, Valley of the Dolls, and others; '70s: Saturday Night Fever; '80s: Against All Odds; '90s: Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves; '00s: Once, Shrek 2).

The originals may be

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Soundtrack finds Linda Eder musically "going to the movies" with a carefully selected set of songs from films that span five decades ('60s: Help, Charade, Valley of the Dolls, and others; '70s: Saturday Night Fever; '80s: Against All Odds; '90s: Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves; '00s: Once, Shrek 2).

The originals may be familiar and beloved, but Eder and her band reworked them, rendering the songs in an intimate, fireside style. "We did most of the music in a jazzy pop version. We wanted to find arrangements that were a little different and worked for my voice," says Eder. From the Label

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Linda Eder   Primary Artist,Vocals
Lonnie Plaxico   Bass
Peter White   Guitar
Mickey Raphael   Harmonica
David Angell   Violin
John Catchings   Cello,Soloist
David Davidson   Violin
Barry Green   Trombone
Tony Levin   Bass
Sam Levine   Flute,Alto Flute
Jerry Marotta   Drums
Gene Miller   Background Vocals
Craig Nelson   Bass
Kim Scharnberg   Trombone,Conductor
Pamela Sixfin   Violin
Billy Jay Stein   Piano,Keyboards,Musical Direction
Kristin Wilkinson   Leader,Viola
Jennifer Kummer   French Horn
Ben Butler   Guitar
Roger M. Weissmeyer   English Horn,Oboe

Technical Credits

Henry Mancini   Composer
Fred Neil   Composer
Phil Collins   Composer
John Lennon   Composer
Paul McCartney   Composer
Michael Kamen   Composer
Michel Legrand   Composer
André Previn   Composer
Peter Collins   Producer
Robin Gibb   Composer
Dory Previn   Composer
Barry Gibb   Composer
David Bryson   Composer
Luigi Creatore   Composer
Maurice Gibb   Composer
Norman Gimbel   Composer
David Immerglück   Composer
Robert John "Mutt" Lange   Composer
Hugo Peretti   Composer
Johnny Mercer   Composer
Kim Scharnberg   String Arrangements,Woodwind Arrangement
Billy Jay Stein   Engineer
George David Weiss   Composer
Adam Duritz   Composer
Trina Shoemaker   Engineer
Paul Antonell   Engineer
Hollis King   Art Direction
Glen Hansard   Composer
Pete Caigan   Engineer
Matthew Malley   Composer
Markéta Irglová   Composer

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Soundtrack 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
SteveKPA More than 1 year ago
LInda Eder has to be one of the most versitile, amazing artists on the planet! The nuances & richness of her voice shine through in every track of this CD. The arrangements are subtly jazzy and hip. Each track adds a new twist and raw emotion to popular familiar songs. Listening to this CD you just get lost in beautiful music.
Pygmalion More than 1 year ago
This is by far the best Linda Eder album! Her voice is amazing and the orchestration on each track great! I wish she could work with Diana Krall in the future!!!Hey, they are in the same record label!
DDFAN More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gave this as a gift and the recipient was thrilled...have other of Linda's CD's..she's great
pat72 More than 1 year ago
The story is entrancing as the voices of Jackson, Mississipi pour out their words of the south in the early 60's. The raw pain of the black and differences of living in the south becomes apparent as black maids courageous voices tell of living through obstable after obstacle. Life was difficult in the homes of the white folk they serve. White people determined the quality of life of the black people who survived on minimum wage and who had little recourse if they were let go. It was a struggle to find another job and if blackballed, the maid could not find another job and her family felt those consequences too. Good white ladies of those days tended to misuse their power and treat their servants with disrespect despite their church attendance and good manners, some of them were cruel to those who served them. The white women lived their lives hypnotically, dancing to the tune of society and they lived their lives according to what "society" expected of them in the south of that day. It was more important to look good than to be good or to look within for growth and development. But one young white woman changed many lives as she struggled with the southern culture and the way she had been raised. Her eyes opened after she finished college and learned how little she really knew about life and living. Stepping out of her hypnotic trance she began to see the cruelty imposed on blacks while truly opening her eyes to the cruelty and hypocrisy of her parents generation and of her peers. By reaching out and learning to trust each other, the white woman and black maids work together in secrecy to tell their stories. It is a long journey for them but it allows all of them to look at their lives in a new way, to find strengths they didnt know they had and to make choices based on a new found paradigm. Granted, the whites lived within the confines of their culture when blacks were considered not to be as smart, as clean or inferior to the white women who voiced their prejudices even in front of their maids as if they could not hear, did not feel. Many black maids raised their children, cooked their meals, cleaned their houses, used separate toilets and ate their meals in the kitchen unable to join their employer eating in the dining room. The feelings come out in the simple telling of the stories by the black maids and one white female. Sometimes the black maids were verbally abused at work and at home. Separate water fountains, separate toilets, and the back of the bus are all evident in these sometimes painful stories the maids tell. Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks are part of the background of their lives but they are moving to the front. What sustains these courageous black women was the love they had for their families, their children and their friends. Their churches were important in their lives for support, and though downtrodden church members tried to help each other and received support from their pastor. Their sustenance and existence hinged on their being able to satisfy the white people for whom they were employed. One maid was imprisoned on the word of her white employer and the meager money she was saving to send her twins to college was lost to legal representation but her church vowed to save the money so the twins could have a chance for a better life-college. Each woman tells a different story, sometimes angry, sometimes sad but always with a generosity of spirit and love.
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