Soups of Italy: Cooking over 175 of the Best Italian Soups

Soups of Italy: Cooking over 175 of the Best Italian Soups

by Norma Wasserman-Miller
     
 

From preparing the lightest broth soups to hearty main coursesoups of vegetables, legumes, or fish, Norma Wasserman-Millertakes you into the kitchens of some of Italys best cooks to showyou how to transform simple basic ingredients into a wealth ofdelicious Italian soups.

Enjoy the wide range of soups prepared throughout Italy, fromthe great classics to superb

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Overview

From preparing the lightest broth soups to hearty main coursesoups of vegetables, legumes, or fish, Norma Wasserman-Millertakes you into the kitchens of some of Italys best cooks to showyou how to transform simple basic ingredients into a wealth ofdelicious Italian soups.

Enjoy the wide range of soups prepared throughout Italy, fromthe great classics to superb original recipes created by some of Italys finest chefs. Sample a fragrant pasta and bean soup made with fennel; an aromatic pumpkin and herb minestrone; a savory fish soup made with porcini mushrooms; an elegant farro and radicchio soup; or one of the peasant soups that turn stale bread into a flavorful soup.

Each chapter gives clear directions and techniques for cooking the rich variety of Italian soups that include minestrone, pasta and bean, vegetable, fish, meat, bread, and grain soups. The uncommon authenticity and richness of this soup collection is wholesome, satisfying, and thoroughly delicious.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Italy, with its long tradition of peasant cooking and flair for creating big tastes with little fuss, is good soup country. Unfortunately, Wasserman-Miller (coauthor of Risotto) brings unnecessary complexity and pretentiousness to her collection of regional recipes culled mostly from restaurants and the kitchens of professional cooks. North and South, city and countryside are represented in selections that range from delicate first-course broths to hearty minestroni that make the meal. Pasta-and-bean soups are presented in all their regional glory from Tuscany to Sicily. There are fish soups, including Brodetto di Pesce alla Veneta (Venetian Fish Soup), and meat soups such as Zuppa di Anatra, a duck soup enlivened by a touch of balsamic vinegar. The recipes generally yield great soups, but Wasserman-Miller's cumbersome instructions are not eased by her enthusiasm for Italian. There are times when you don't know whether you're reading a cookbook or taking a language course. Wasserman-Miller, who owns a specialty food store in Cambridge, Mass., also asks readers to buy many specialty ingredients. There's little reason for a general cookbook to call for "preferably estate Tuscan" extra virgin olive oil in one bean soup while another begs for "preferably estate Ligurian." Wasserman-Miller doesn't always hew to her own observation that soups are "only good basic ingredients, prepared simply and healthfully." (Jan.)
Library Journal
Both Famularo and Wasserman-Miller stress the regional nature of Italian soups, and both include dozens of traditional recipes for minestre and minestrone, brodo, and zuppe. But Famularo, who grew up in a large Italian-American household, has a more personal approach, while Wasserman-Miller, who fell in love with Italy on her first visit there and later opened a Boston food shop called Formaggio, takes a somewhat more formal one, with more explanations of basic techniques and culinary background. Famularo includes many fondly remembered family recipes as well as favorites from his travels to Italy; Wasserman-Miller's collection seems a bit more wide-ranging, featuring some less well-known recipes along with the classics. Although there is some overlap here, of course, the two authors' approaches and interpretations of the traditional recipes are different enough to make both these books worth adding to most collections; they're also good companions to Margaret and G. Franco Ramagnoli's Zuppa! (LJ 12/96).

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688150310
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
01/28/1998
Pages:
300
Product dimensions:
8.26(w) x 8.31(h) x 1.00(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Gnocchetti di Ricotta in Brodo
Ricotta Dumplings in Broth

These delicate dumplings of ricotta, pecorino, and parsley are a specialty of Calabria. Substituting fresh coriander for all or part of the parsley makes for a lovely aromatic variation.

Sapori12 ounces ricotta cheese, well drained
1 large egg and 1 egg yolk
2 tablespoons minced fresh Italian parsley
1 1/2 tablespoons grated pecorino Romano cheese
1/2 to 3/4 cup soft bread crumbs
Freshly ground pepper to taste

Brodo
5 to 6 cups Classic Meat Broth (page 36) or Vegetable Broth (page 40)

1. Drain the ricotta of as much liquid as possible and combine in a bowl with the rest of the sapori. Mix together, adding just enough bread crumbs to hold the mixture together.2. Bring the brodo to a boil. Pinch off cherry-sized pieces of the ricotta mixture and drop into the broth. The mixture will be wet, but once dropped into the broth it should hold together. Drop one in. If it separates, add some more bread crumbs. Cook for a few minutes from the time the last gnocchetto is added.
serves: 4 cooking time: 5 minutes

Copyright © 1998 by Norma Wasserman-Miller

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