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Sources of Chinese Tradition: Volume 1: From Earliest Times to 1600 / Edition 2
     

Sources of Chinese Tradition: Volume 1: From Earliest Times to 1600 / Edition 2

4.5 2
by Wm. Theodore de de Bary, Irene Bloom, Richard Lufrano, Joseph Adler, Irene Bloom
 

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ISBN-10: 0231109393

ISBN-13: 9780231109390

Pub. Date: 01/21/2000

Publisher: Columbia University Press

A collection of seminal primary readings on the social, intellectual, and religious traditions of China, Sources of Chinese Tradition, Volume 1 has been widely used and praised for almost forty years as an authoritative resource for scholars and students and as a thorough and engaging introduction for general readers. Here at last is a completely revised and

Overview

A collection of seminal primary readings on the social, intellectual, and religious traditions of China, Sources of Chinese Tradition, Volume 1 has been widely used and praised for almost forty years as an authoritative resource for scholars and students and as a thorough and engaging introduction for general readers. Here at last is a completely revised and expanded edition of this classic sourcebook, compiled by noted China scholars Wm. Theodore de Bary and Irene Bloom. Updated to reflect recent scholarly developments, with extensive material on popular thought and religion, social roles, and women's education, this edition features new translations of more than half the works from the first edition, as well as many new selections.

Arranged chronologically, this anthology is divided into four parts, beginning at the dawn of literate Chinese civilization with the Oracle-Bone inscriptions of the late Shang dynasty (1571–1045 B.C.E.) and continuing through the end of the Ming dynasty (C.E. 1644). Each chapter has an introduction that provides useful historical context and offers interpretive strategies for understanding the readings.

The first part, The Chinese Tradition in Antiquity, considers the early development of Chinese civilization and includes selections from Confucius's Analects, the texts of Mencius and Laozi, as well as other key texts from the Confucian, Daoist, and Legalist schools. Part 2, The Making of a Classical Culture, focuses on Han China with readings from the Classic of Changes (I Jing), the Classic of Filiality, major Han syntheses, and the great historians of the Han dynasty. The development of Buddhism, from the earliest translations from Sanskrit to the central texts of the Chan school (which became Zen in Japan), is the subject of the third section of the book. Titled Later Daoism and Mahayana Buddhism in China, this part also covers the teachings of Wang Bi, Daoist religion, and texts of the major schools of Buddhist doctrine and practice. The final part, The Confucian Revival and Neo-Confucianism, details the revival of Confucian thought in the Tang, Song, and Ming periods, with historical documents that link philosophical thought to political, social, and educational developments in late imperial China.

With annotations, a detailed chronology, glossary, and a new introduction by the editors, Sources of Chinese Tradition will continue to be a standard resource, guidebook, and introduction to Chinese civilization well into the twenty-first century.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780231109390
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Publication date:
01/21/2000
Series:
Introduction to Asian Civilizations Series
Edition description:
second edition
Pages:
944
Sales rank:
326,757
Product dimensions:
6.16(w) x 9.19(h) x 1.84(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

Part 1. The Chinese Tradition in Antiquity1. The Oracle-Bone Inscriptions of the Late Shang Dynasty, by David N. Keightley2. Classical Sources of Chinese Tradition, by Burton Watson, David S. Nivison, Irene Bloom3. Confucius and the Analects, by Irene Bloom4. Mozi: Utilitarianism, Uniformity, and Universal Love, by Burton Watson5. The Way of Laozi and Zhuangzi6. The Evolution of the Confucian Tradition in Antiquity7. Legalists and MilitaristsPart 2. The Making of a Classical Culture8. The Han Reaction to Qin Despotism9. Syncretic Visions of State, Society, and Cosmos, by Harold Roth, Sarah Queen, Nathan Sivin10. The Imperial Order and Han Syntheses11. The Economic Order, by Burton Watson, Wm. Theodore deBary12. The Great Han Historians, by Burton WatsonPart 3. Later Daoism and Mahyana Buddhism in China13. Learning of the Mysterious, by Richard John Lynn, Wing-tsit Chan, Irene Bloom14. Daoist Religion, by Franciscus Verellen, Nathan Sivin, et al.15. The Introduction of Buddhism, by Leon Hurvitz, Tsai Heng-ting16. Schools of Buddhist Doctrine, by Leon Hurvitz, Burton Watson, Daniel Stevenson, George Tanabe, Wing-Tsit Chan17. Schools of Buddhist Practice, by Leon Hurvitz, Daniel Stevenson, Philip B. Yampolsky, Chun-fang YuPart 4. The Confucian Revival and Neo-ConfucianismSocial Life and Political Culture in the TangThe Confucian Revival in the SongNeo-Confucianism: The Philosophy of Human Nature and the Way of the SageZhu Xi's Neo-Confucian Program, by Wm. Theodore deBaryIdeological Foundations of Late Imperial China, by Wm. Theodore deBary, Edward Farmer, John DardessNeo-Confucian Education, by Wm. Thedore deBarySelf and Society in the MingGlossaryBibliographyPinyin to Wade-Giles Romanization ChartIndex

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Sources of Chinese Tradition: Volume 1: From Earliest Times to 1600 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
BrianGriffith More than 1 year ago
This collection of excerpts from the greatest Chinese writing is like a museum for philosophy through the centuries. The editor's excellent introductions are like statements of museum curators. And the full tour delivers a far more powerful encounter with Chinese history than any museum of artifacts. It gives direct experience of the breadth, style, and intensity of thought as it evolved age by age. These writings are selected on the basis of their historical importance more than their entertainment value, and some enormously influential pieces from the past seem overly abstract or pedantic to modern Western tastes. Also, this collection of "sources" is almost entirely philosophical. The collection highlights serious philosophy, leaving aside popular myth, folklore, poetry, drama, or fictional literature, which are also sources of tradition. --author of A Galaxy of Immortal Women: The Yin Side of Chinese Civilization
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'll make this short...For anyone interested in Chinese history, literature, or culture, this volume is an absolutely essential collection of primary sources, and includes prefaces and explanations by China scholars. There is no one better than de Bary, and this new edition includes everything from the 1960 edition up through the Jiang Zemin era.