BN.com Gift Guide

The Sources of Innovation / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $19.50
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 62%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $19.50   
  • New (3) from $32.98   
  • Used (6) from $19.50   

Overview


It has long been assumed that new product innovations are typically developed by product manufacturers, an assumption that has inevitably had a major impact on innovation-related research and activities ranging from how firms organize their research and development to how governments measure innovation. In this synthesis of his seminal research, von Hippel challenges that basic assumption and demonstrates that innovation occurs in different places in different industries. Presenting a series of studies showing that end-users, material suppliers, and others are the typical sources of innovation in some fields, von Hippel explores why this variation in the "functional" sources of innovation occurs and how it might be predicted. He also proposes and tests some implications of replacing a manufacturer-as-innovator assumption with a view of the innovation process as predictably distributed across users, manufacturers, and suppliers. Innovation, he argues, will take place where there is greatest economic benefit to the innovator.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195094220
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 9/22/1994
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 232
  • Product dimensions: 9.19 (w) x 6.13 (h) x 0.68 (d)

Table of Contents

1. Overview
The Functional Source of Innovation
Variations in the Source of Innovation
An Economic Explanation
Understanding the Distributed Innovation Process: Know-How Between Rivals
Managing the Distributed Innovation Process: Predicting and Shifting the Sources of Innovation
Implications for Innovation Research
Implications for Innovation Management
Implications for Innovation Policy
2. Users as Innovators
The Sources of Scientific Instrument Innovations
The Sources of Semiconductor and Printed Circuit Board Assembly Process Innovations
The User-Dominated Innovation Process
3. Variations in the Functional Source of Innovation
Users as Innovators: Pultrusion
Manufacturers as Innovators: The Tractor Shovel
Manufacturers as Innovators: Engineering Thermoplastics
Manufacturers as Innovators: Plastics Additives
Suppliers as Innovators
Supplier/Manufacturers as Innovators: Wire Termination Equipment
Suppliers as Innovators: Process Equipment Utilizing Industrial Gases and Thermoplastics
Additional Evidence on Nonmanufacturer Innovation
4. The Functional Source of Innovation as an Economic Phenomenon
The Hypothesis
Necessary Preconditions
Patents and Liscensing
Trade Secrets and Licsensing
5. Testing the Relationship Between the Functional Source of Innovation and Expected Innovation Rents
Five Empirical Tests
Pultrusion Process Machinery: Innovation and Innovation Rents
The Tractor Shovel: Innovation and Innovation Rents
Engineering Plastics: Innovation and Innovation Rents
Process Equipment Utilizing Industrial Gases and Thermoplastics: Innovation and Innovation Rents
Conclusions and Discussion
6. Cooperation Between Rivals: The Informal Trading of Technical Know-how
Case Study: Informal Trading of Proprietary Process Know-how Between U.S. Steel Minimill Producers
An Economic Explanation for Know-how Trading
Informal Know-how Trading in Context
Discussion
7. Shifting the Functional Source of Innovation
Nature of the Test
The Test
Commercial Value of User-Developed Innovations
Summary
8. Predicting the Source of Innovation: Lead Users
Root of the Problem: Marketing Research Constrained by User Experience
Lead Users as a Solution
Testing the Method
Discussion
9. Epilougue: Applications for Innovation Management
Identifying an Innovation Process Role
Organizing for an Innovation Process Role
The Distributed Innovation Process as a System
References
Appendix: Innovation Histories
Introduction
Data set for scientific Instrument Innovations
Data set for Semiconductor Process Innovation
Data set for Pultrusion Process Machinery Innovations
Data set for The Tractor Shovel
Data set for Engineering Plastics
Data set for Plastics Additives
Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)