Sources of Japanese Tradition / Edition 1 by Wm. Theodore de de Bary, Donald Keene, Ry-Usaku Tsunoda | | 9780231086059 | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Sources of Japanese Tradition / Edition 1

Sources of Japanese Tradition / Edition 1

by Wm. Theodore de de Bary
     
 

ISBN-10: 0231086059

ISBN-13: 9780231086059

Pub. Date: 03/15/1964

Publisher: Columbia University Press

Since it was first published more than forty years ago, Sources of Japanese Tradition, Volume 2, has been considered the authoritative sourcebook for readers and scholars interested in Japan from the eighteenth century to the post-World War II period. Now greatly expanded to include the entire twentieth century, and beginning in 1600, Sources of Japanese

Overview

Since it was first published more than forty years ago, Sources of Japanese Tradition, Volume 2, has been considered the authoritative sourcebook for readers and scholars interested in Japan from the eighteenth century to the post-World War II period. Now greatly expanded to include the entire twentieth century, and beginning in 1600, Sources of Japanese Tradition presents writings by modern Japan's most important philosophers, religious figures, writers and political leaders. The volume also offers extensive introductory essays and commentary to assist in understanding the documents' historical settings and significance. Wonderfully varied in its selections, this eagerly anticipated expanded edition has revised many of the texts from the original edition and added a great many not included or translated before. New additions include documents on the postwar era, the importance of education in the process of modernization, and women's issues.

Beginning with documents from the founding of the Tokugawa shogunate, the collection's essays, manifestos, religious tracts, political documents, and memoirs reflect major Japanese religious, philosophical, social and political movements. Subjects covered include the spread of neo-Confucian and Buddhist teachings, Japanese poetry and aesthetics, and the Meiji Restoration. Other documents reflect the major political trends and events of the period: the abolition of feudalism, agrarian reform, the emergence of poltical parties and liberalism, and the Sino-Japanese and Russo-Japanese Wars. The collection also includes Western and Japanese impressions of each other through Western religious missions and commercial and cultural exchanges. These selections underscore Japanese and Western apprehension of and fascination with each other.

As Japan entered the twentieth century, new political and social movements — Marxism, anarchism, socialism, nationalism, and feminism — entered the national consciousness. Later readings in the collection look at the buildup to war with the United States, military defeat and American occupation. Documents from the postwar period echo Japan's struggle with its own history and its development as a capitalist democracy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780231086059
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Publication date:
03/15/1964
Series:
Records of Civilization Sources and Studies Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
406
Product dimensions:
5.34(w) x 8.31(h) x 0.95(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

Chronological Table
xiii
Chapter XXII: The Shinto Revival
1(46)
KADA AZUMAMARO: Petition for the Establishment of a School of National Learning
5(4)
KAMO MABUCHI: A Study of the Idea of the Nation
9(6)
MOTOORI NORINAGA
15(20)
The True Tradition of the Sun Goddness
15(4)
Wonder
19(3)
The Error of Rationalism
22(2)
The Fact of Evil
24(3)
Good and Evil in the Tale of Genji
27(3)
Love and Poerty
30(5)
HIRATA ATSUTANE
35(12)
On Japanese Learning
37(2)
The Land of the Gods
39(1)
The Creator God
40(1)
Dutch Learning
41(1)
Ancient Japanese Ethics
42(1)
The Art of Medicine
43(1)
Life After Death
44(3)
Chapter XXIII: Reformers of the Late Tokugawa Period
47(37)
HONDA TOSHIAKI AND THE DISCOVERY OF EUROPE
48(8)
Secret Plan for Managing the Country: Shipping
51(2)
Colonization
53(3)
SATO NOBUHIRO AND TOTALITARIAN NATIONALISM
56(17)
Preface to the Essence of Economics
59(6)
The Population Problem
65(2)
Total Government
67(2)
Creation and Cultivation
69(1)
Confidential Plan of World Unification
70(3)
NINOMIYA SONTOKU: AGRARIAN REFORM AND COOPERATIVE PLANNING
73(11)
The Repayment of Virtue
77(1)
The Practice of Repayment
78(1)
The Way of Nature
78(1)
The "Pill" of the Three Religions
79(2)
The Society for the Repayment of Virtue
81(3)
Chapter XXIV: The Debate Over Seclusion and Restoration
84(47)
THE LATER MITO SCHOOL
85(11)
AIZAWA SEISHISAI: Preface to the New Proposals
88(2)
The National Policy
90(3)
The Danger from the West
93(2)
The Source of Western Unity and Strength
95(1)
THE OPENING OF JAPAN FROM WITHIN
96(1)
SAKUMA SHOZAN: EASTERN ETHICS AND WESTERN SCIENCE
96(13)
Reflections on My Errors
101(8)
YOSHIDA SHOIN AND THE VALUE OF DEATH
109(7)
On Leadership
111(1)
On Being Direct
112(1)
Arms and Learning
112(1)
Facing Death
113(1)
Selfishness and Heroism
114(2)
FUKUZAWA YUKICHI, PIONEER OF WESTERNIZATION
116(15)
Excerpts from His Autobiography
118(13)
Chapter XXV: The Meiji Era
131(80)
LEADERS OF THE RESTORATION AND RENOVATION
132(2)
THE ENLIGHTENED RULE OF EMPEROR MEIJI
134(6)
The Charter Oath
136(1)
The Constitution of 1868
137(2)
The Imperial Rescript on Education
139(1)
KIDO KOIN AND THE NEW REGIME
140(7)
The Voluntary Surrender of the Feudal Domains
141(1)
Observations on Returning from the West
142(3)
The Need for News of the West
145(2)
SAIGO TAKAMORI AND THE SAMURAI SPIRIT
147(3)
Letters to Itagaki on the Korean Question
148(2)
OKUBO TOSHIMICHI AND THE KOREAN QUESTION
150(6)
Reasons for Opposing the Korean Expedition
151(5)
ITO HIROBUMI AND THE CONSTITUTION
156(16)
Memorandum of Okubo's Views on Constitutional Government
158(1)
From an Address on the Constitution
159(2)
On the Constitution of 1889
161(3)
Reminiscences on the Drafting of the New Constitution
164(5)
Speech on the Restoration and Constitutional Government
169(3)
OKUMA AND POLITICAL DEMOCRACY
172(4)
ITAGAKI TAISUKE: Memorial on the Establishment of a Representative Assembly
176(2)
Address on Liberty
178(4)
OZAKI YUKIO: Factions and Parties
182(1)
OKUMA SHIGENOBU
183(10)
Suggestions to the Emperor
183(1)
On the Launching of the Progressive Party
184(1)
To the Members of the Progressive Party
185(2)
Party Politics and Public Opinion
187(2)
Education--A Pluralistic View
189(1)
Citizenship in the New World
189(2)
Conclusion to Fifty Years of New Japan
191(2)
YAMAGATA ARITOMO AND THE ARMY
193(18)
Military Conscription Ordinance
196(2)
Imperial Precepts to Soldiers and Sailors
198(3)
Local Self-Government
201(2)
On the Unity of the Cabinet
203(1)
Yamagata's Political Faith
204(2)
Racial Conflict and Japan's Foreign Policy
206(3)
China and the Twenty-One Demands
209(2)
Chapter XXVI: The High Tide of Prewar Liberalism
211(41)
DEMOCRACY AT HOME
217(29)
YOSHINO SAKUZO: On the Meaning of Constitutional Government
217(22)
MINOBE TATSUKICHI: Defense of the "Organ" Theory
239(7)
PEACEFUL COOPERATION ABROAD
246(6)
SHIDEHARA KIJURO: A Rapprochement with China
247(2)
International Cooperation and Arms Reduction
249(1)
YAMAMURO SOBUN: Call for a Peaceful Japan
250(2)
Chapter XXVII: The Rise of Revolutionary Nationalism
252(47)
JAPAN AND ASIA
254(5)
An Anniversary Statement by the Amur Society
255(4)
AGITATION BY ASSASSINATION
259(3)
ASAHI HEIGO: Call for a New "Restoration"
260(2)
THE PLIGHT OF THE COUNTRYSIDE
262(4)
GONDO SEIKEI: The Gap between the Privileged Classes and the Commoners
263(3)
KITA IKKI AND THE REFORM WING OF ULTRANATIONALISM
266(11)
Plan for the Reorganization of Japan
268(9)
THE CONSERVATIVE REAFFIRMATION
277(11)
Fundamentals of Our National Polity
278(10)
THE JUSTIFICATION FOR WAR
288(1)
OKAWA SHUMEI: The Way of Japan and the Japanese
288(1)
HASHIMOTO KINGORO: The Need for Emigration and Expansion
289(2)
THE DECLARATION OF WAR
291(3)
TOKUTOMI IICHIRO: Comentary on the Imperial Declaration of War
291(3)
THE WAR GOAL
294(5)
Draft of Basic Plan for Establishment of Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere: Outline of Construction
294(5)
Chapter XXVIII: The Japanese Social Movement
299(39)
A Summons to the Workers
300(4)
KOTOKU SHUSUI: Renunciation of Parliamentary Tactics
304(3)
Resolution of the Japan General Federation of Labor
307(2)
ABE ISOO: The Second Restoration
309(4)
KAWAKAMI HAJIME
313(8)
A Letter from Prison
315(1)
Concerning Marxism
316(5)
A Change of Direction?--Statement of the Socialist Masses Party
321(4)
KAWAI EIJIRO: Defense of Liberal Socialism
325(5)
AKAMATSU KATSUMARO: The Japanese Social Movement in Retrospect
330(2)
OYAMA IKUO: Japan's Future Course
332(6)
Chapter XXIX: The Japanese Tradition in the Modern World
338(63)
UCHIMURA KANZO
340(10)
How I Became a Christian
341(4)
The Case of Lese Majesty
345(2)
The Non-Church Movement
347(1)
Japanese Christianity
348(1)
"Two J's"
349(1)
NISHIDA KITARO: The Problem of Japanese Culture
350(15)
KAW KAMI HAJIME: Religious Truth and Scientific Truth
365(8)
TANAKA KOTARO: In Search of Truth and Peace
373(11)
HASEGAWA NYOZEKAN: The Lost Japan and the New Japan
384(9)
KAMEI KATSUICHIRO: Return to the East
393(8)
Index 401
Map Japan in the Nineteenth Century
xv

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