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Southern Bastards, Volume 1: Here Was a Man
     

Southern Bastards, Volume 1: Here Was a Man

4.2 5
by Jason Aaron, Jason Latour (Illustrator)
 

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Earl Tubb is an angry old man with a very big stick.
Euless Boss is a high school football coach with no more room in his office for trophies and no more room underneath the bleachers for burying bodies. And they're just two of the folks you'll meet in Castor County, Alabama, home of
Boss BBQ, the state champion Runnin' Rebs and more bastards than you've ever

Overview

Earl Tubb is an angry old man with a very big stick.
Euless Boss is a high school football coach with no more room in his office for trophies and no more room underneath the bleachers for burying bodies. And they're just two of the folks you'll meet in Castor County, Alabama, home of
Boss BBQ, the state champion Runnin' Rebs and more bastards than you've ever seen!

What does old Earl Tubb do when he returns home to Craw County, Ala., only to find the place a veritable criminal fiefdom run by Euless Boss, the local high school football coach? Why, pick up the stick helpfully cleaved by lightning from a tree growing out of his daddy's grave and start meting out justice just like his father, the old sheriff, did. In the cleaning-up-the-dirty-old-town
Southern-fried pulper, writer Aaron (Scalped) and artist Jason Latour (Django
Unchained) spread around no more story than is absolutely necessary, and most of it involves people being at the wrong end of a stick, baseball bat, or even (in an early fight scene) a deep-fryer basket. Both Jasons hail from the South, as they discuss in a particularly bighearted introduction, and so likely feel unencumbered by concerns about overdosing on clichés. Thus, the high-impact pages are strewn with bruising high school football, sweet tea,
barbecue, trucker caps, and snarling rednecks. The story, in which Tubb clobbers his way through throngs of underlings to get at Boss, is no more complicated than a redo of Walking Tall. But there's a thread of something deeper, bloodier,
and more resonant that often transcends the usual psychotic-redneck shtick,
aided in no small part by Latour's spare, elegant art.” - Publishers
Weekly

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
11/03/2014
What does old Earl Tubb do when he returns home to Craw County, Ala., only to find the place a veritable criminal fiefdom run by Euless Boss, the local high school football coach? Why, pick up the stick helpfully cleaved by lightning from a tree growing out of his daddy’s grave and start meting out justice just like his father, the old sheriff, did. In the cleaning-up-the-dirty-old-town Southern-fried pulper, writer Aaron (Scalped) and artist Jason Latour (Django Unchained) spread around no more story than is absolutely necessary, and most of it involves people being at the wrong end of a stick, baseball bat, or even (in an early fight scene) a deep-fryer basket. Both Jasons hail from the South, as they discuss in a particularly bighearted introduction, and so likely feel unencumbered by concerns about overdosing on clichés. Thus, the high-impact pages are strewn with bruising high school football, sweet tea, barbecue, trucker caps, and snarling rednecks. The story, in which Tubb clobbers his way through throngs of underlings to get at Boss, is no more complicated than a redo of Walking Tall. But there’s a thread of something deeper, bloodier, and more resonant that often transcends the usual psychotic-redneck shtick, aided in no small part by Latour’s spare, elegant art. (Oct.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781632150165
Publisher:
Image Comics
Publication date:
10/14/2014
Series:
Southern Bastards Series
Edition description:
Mature Readers (ages 16 and up)
Pages:
128
Sales rank:
225,581
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
16 Years

Meet the Author

Jason Aaron is an American comic book writer, known for his work on titles such as The Other Side, Scalped, Ghost Rider, Wolverine and PunisherMAX. He currently lives in Kansas City

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Southern Bastards, Volume 1: Here Was a Man 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Urthwild More than 1 year ago
I really honestly did not know what this was about before it went on the tbr pile. Still haunted by memories of a father who had been dead for decades years Earl Tubb is forced to return to his childhood home after a 40 year absence when an elderly relative moves into a nursing home. He gives himself just 3 days to pack up the family belongings and then get the hell out. What he finds is a town and a county ruled by fear and overridden with crime all overseen by the dastardly Euless Boss, who on the surface is just a harmless high school football coach. When a childhood acquaintance is brutally murdered and the local sheriff seems unwilling or incapable of dispensing law and order Earl decides to take a stand. You will love the character of Earl and his pursuit of justice, the victim may not have wanted it, but Earl is determined to do right by him. I saw in my mind’s eye an old Clint Eastwood playing Earl circa 1990. Excellent story by Jason Aaron and fantastic atmospheric graphics from Jason Latour. The artwork gives Earl a grizzled but formidable appearance, a certain gravitas. The only annoying character was the mangy mutt, arf, arf, arf, arf. It ended on a perfect cliffhanger, leaving me wanting more, what has happened to Earl? Will the townsfolk raise up? Will Earl’s daughter come looking for him? Is Earl’s daughter a badass, but ultimately moral character like her dad? What did Dusty actually do? Does anyone care what Dusty did? Am I the only one who wants to know what Dusty actually did? Does it matter what Dusty did? How did Euless Boss gain so much power? Why do the high school members of the football team look so old? Will someone put a flea collar on that dog? (It makes me itch). l felt like I should have been chewing a hunk of barbecued rib-eye whilst reading this and then gone to a hoe down. Of course I need to know, what happens next. Received for an honest review. Urthwild
PaulAllard More than 1 year ago
This collection continues the premise that rednecks are inhospitable and downright dangerous. It’s about a man returning to his home town after 40 years and discovering that nothing has changed: it’s run by a dictatorial football coach who controls everything and everyone and destroying anyone who gets in his way. Well-illustrated and engaging, the comic collection is worth a look although a bit brutal and bloody at times. It does the folks of the deep South no favours. It ends with an inevitable volume to follow. Recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love this series the characters are awesome and story is unpredictablei love it bought this book3 different timesfor phone, individuals and the volume.
Donald84 More than 1 year ago
I think this has the potential to really grow into an awesome you can never truly come home again story. I rated 3 stars because its good, not really good, not great, just good. I hope it turns into something awesome, volume 2 ordered.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago