Southern Biscuits
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Southern Biscuits

4.3 6
by Nathalie Dupree, Cynthia Graubart
     
 

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Southern Biscuits features recipes and baking secrets for every biscuit imaginable, including hassle-free easy biscuits to embellished biscuits laced with silky goat butter, crunchy pecans, or tangy pimento cheese. The traditional biscuits in this book encompass a number of types, from beaten biscuits of the Old South and England, to Angel Biscuits—a yeast

Overview

Southern Biscuits features recipes and baking secrets for every biscuit imaginable, including hassle-free easy biscuits to embellished biscuits laced with silky goat butter, crunchy pecans, or tangy pimento cheese. The traditional biscuits in this book encompass a number of types, from beaten biscuits of the Old South and England, to Angel Biscuits—a yeast biscuit sturdy enough to split and fill but light enough to melt in your mouth. Filled with beautiful photography, including dozens of how-to photos showing how to mix, stir, fold, roll, and knead, Southern Biscuits is the definitive biscuit baking book.

Editorial Reviews

Washington Post.com

by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart (Gibbs-Smith, $21.99). We can't think of a better or more definitive source for such a worthy undertaking.

— Bonnie S Benwick

Washington Post.com - Bonnie S. Benwick
by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart (Gibbs-Smith, $21.99). We can't think of a better or more definitive source for such a worthy undertaking.
Washington Post.com - Bonnie S Benwick

by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart (Gibbs-Smith, $21.99). We can’t think of a better or more definitive source for such a worthy undertaking.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781423621768
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
05/01/2011
Pages:
216
Sales rank:
833,836
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 9.26(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range:
16 Years

Read an Excerpt

WHAT I S A BISCUIT?

A biscuit was originally made out of flour and water, the basis of hardtack carried by early travelers. Ultimately, a little lard was added, the dough was beaten hours before shaping and baking, the final product holding a little slivered country ham, becoming a gourmet’s delight called a Beaten Biscuit. (We now make it with a food processor in five minutes.)

Once baking powder was developed in the 1800s—replacing the potash that had been used as a leavening—it was added to the same flour and water and, mixed together and shaped into a round, it became a biscuit. (These are still eaten today as Dorm Biscuits.) Any other addition is an extension of the cook’s imagination, whether whole milk, buttermilk, sour cream, yogurt, whipping cream, shortening, lard, or butter are used. Each adds a different capacity for leavening or flavoring.

The lightest biscuits are made out of delicate white winter-wheat flour, also called “soft wheat” due to its low gluten content. With the addition of a fat and a liquid, usually milk or buttermilk, they are a close cousin to scones, containing sugar and possibly an egg, which the English fill with clotted cream and raspberries and serve for tea, not for breakfast or another meal. The English biscuit, which is a cookie, bears no relation to a scone.
The French have a cake-type called “biscuit,” which neither cookie, bread, nor scone. There was no agreement over the years about how to spell, define, or pronounce the name of our bread. It just was.

Meet the Author

Nathalie Dupree has written or coauthored many cookbooks, including the James Beard award winner Nathalie Dupree’s Southern Memories and Shrimp and Grits.

Cynthia Stevens Graubart is an author and former television producer who began her culinary television production career with New Southern Cooking with Nathalie Dupree in 1985. She is the author of The One-Armed Cook, called the culinary version of What to Expect When You’re Expecting. Cynthia and her husband, Cliff, live in Atlanta, Georgia.

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Southern Biscuits 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
NoLa18 More than 1 year ago
I love this book; I have been reading through it and have found many tips scattered throughout. Biscuits are separated into categories, including "easy" (i.e., those that involve just adding liquids, such as cream, sour cream, or yogurt) and "traditional" (i.e., those that require butter or shortening to be cut into the flour mixture). Also includes recipes other types of related items (e.g., scones and coffeecakes) and recipes that use leftover biscuits. My only caveat is that almost all the recipes that include solid fats call for using the same technique, so there is a good bit of repetition. On the other hand, for at item like a biscuit, technique is king to producing a good result--so that may be a plus.
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