Overview

What did it mean to be a Soviet citizen in the 1970s and 1980s? How can we explain the liberalization that preceded the collapse of the USSR? This period in Soviet history is often depicted as stagnant with stultified institutions and the oppression of socialist citizens. However, the socialist state was not simply an oppressive institution that dictated how to live and what to think?it also responded to and was shaped by individuals? needs.
In Soviet Society in the Era of Late ...
See more details below
Soviet Society in the Era of Late Socialism, 1964-1985

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$53.99
BN.com price
(Save 40%)$89.99 List Price

Overview

What did it mean to be a Soviet citizen in the 1970s and 1980s? How can we explain the liberalization that preceded the collapse of the USSR? This period in Soviet history is often depicted as stagnant with stultified institutions and the oppression of socialist citizens. However, the socialist state was not simply an oppressive institution that dictated how to live and what to think—it also responded to and was shaped by individuals’ needs.
In Soviet Society in the Era of Late Socialism, 1964–85, Neringa Klumbyte and Gulnaz Sharafutdinova bring together scholarship examining the social and cultural life of the USSR and Eastern Europe from 1964 to 1985. This interdisciplinary and comparative study explores topics such as the Soviet middle class, individualism, sexuality, health, late-socialist ethics, and civic participation. Examining this often overlooked era provides the historical context for all post-socialist political, economic, and social developments.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Michael Urban
Revisiting the period of late socialism in the USSR, contributors to this volume search out the rhythms and contours of everyday life and find a multi-vectored reality far removed from conventional Western stereotypes. Cold War Warriors will read this book at their peril.
Peter Rutland
This stimulating collection is one of the first works to delve into the dynamics of daily life under Brezhnev. Its portrayal of a vibrant society which cultivated individualism and consumerism throws down a challenge to conventional wisdom which sees the Soviet Union as a drab monolithic of miserable conformists.
The Russian Review
This volume and other recent studies compel us to reexamine the meaning and nature of late socialism. Even if the Kremlin leadership thought the social foundation on which they stood was firm and stable, it was continually shifting under their feet.
Europe-Asia Studies
Although scholars in the Humanities and Social Sciences have long recognised the ‘stagnation’ paradigm’s limitations, consensus on the need for a more nuanced set of concepts, analytical tools, and periodisations for the study of Soviet society in the 1970s–1980s has only begun to crystallise in recent years. This volume’s welcome appearance speaks to the rapidly growing interdisciplinary interest in the social experience of living in the Soviet Union from the Brezhnev era (1964–1982) through Perestroika. Political scientists Neringa Klumbyte and Gulnaz Sharafutdinova bring together a welcome collection of essays dealing with a range of topics relevant to social change during these decades. . . .[T]his volume advances our field and sets the agenda for scholarly discussion on Late Socialism for the near future.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780739175842
  • Publisher: Lexington Books
  • Publication date: 10/19/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • File size: 545 KB

Meet the Author

Acknowledgments
Introduction: What Was Late Socialism?
By Neringa Klumbyte and Gulnaz Sharafutdinova
1. Plutonium Enriched: Making Bombs and Middle-Classes
By Kate Brown
2. A Middle Class without Capitalism? Socialist Ideology and Post-Collectivist Discourse in the Late Soviet Era
By Anna Paretskaya
3. “Cultural Wars” in the Closed City of Soviet Ukraine, 1959–82
By Sergei I. Zhuk
4. Soviet Ethical Citizenship: Morality, the State, and Laughter in Late Soviet Lithuania
By Neringa Klumbyte
5. Pluralizing Practices in Late-Socialist Moscow: Russian Alternative Practitioners Reclaim and Redefine Individualism
By Larisa Honey
6. Football in the Era of “Changing Stagnation”: The Case of Spartak Moscow
By Robert Edelman
7. Beyond the Genres of Stagnation: Reading the Allure of I. Grekova’s The Hotel Manager
By Benjamin M. Sutcliffe
8. Raped with Politburon: Bawdy Humor and Disempowerment in Yuz Aleshkovsky’s Prose
By Olga Livshin
Afterword: Postcard from Berlin: Rethinking the Juncture of Late Socialism and Late Liberalism in Europe
By Dominic Boyer
Bibliography
About the Authors
Index
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: What Was Late Socialism?
By Neringa Klumbyte and Gulnaz Sharafutdinova
1. Plutonium Enriched: Making Bombs and Middle-Classes
By Kate Brown
2. A Middle Class without Capitalism? Socialist Ideology and Post-Collectivist Discourse in the Late Soviet Era
By Anna Paretskaya
3. “Cultural Wars” in the Closed City of Soviet Ukraine, 1959–82
By Sergei I. Zhuk
4. Soviet Ethical Citizenship: Morality, the State, and Laughter in Late Soviet Lithuania
By Neringa Klumbyte
5. Pluralizing Practices in Late-Socialist Moscow: Russian Alternative Practitioners Reclaim and Redefine Individualism
By Larisa Honey
6. Football in the Era of “Changing Stagnation”: The Case of Spartak Moscow
By Robert Edelman
7. Beyond the Genres of Stagnation: Reading the Allure of I. Grekova’s The Hotel Manager
By Benjamin M. Sutcliffe
8. Raped with Politburon: Bawdy Humor and Disempowerment in Yuz Aleshkovsky’s Prose
By Olga Livshin
Afterword: Postcard from Berlin: Rethinking the Juncture of Late Socialism and Late Liberalism in Europe
By Dominic Boyer
Bibliography
About the Authors
Index
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)