Space to Speke: The Confessional Subject in Medieval Literature

Space to Speke: The Confessional Subject in Medieval Literature

by Jerry Root
     
 

The confessional practice that develops after the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 makes possible a new cultural and literary discourse of the self. This book explores the impact of confessional discourse on fourteenth-century European literature. The approach is interdisciplinary. The author studies examples of the «confessional» texts of Augustine and

Overview

The confessional practice that develops after the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 makes possible a new cultural and literary discourse of the self. This book explores the impact of confessional discourse on fourteenth-century European literature. The approach is interdisciplinary. The author studies examples of the «confessional» texts of Augustine and Abelard as well as the vernacular didactic literature on confession after 1215. This literature creates a new and more popular language of the self. The literary texts of Chaucer, Machaut, and Juan Ruiz clearly demonstrate the influence of a confessional «self» and use the language of confession to explore and construct the self as literary subject.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Studies examples of the early Christian confessional texts of Augustine and Abelard, then focuses on how the literature of the 14th century was affected by the confessional discourse that had developed after the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215. Looking at the work of Chaucer, Machaut, and Juan Ruiz, finds that the literature created a new and more popular language of the self. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780820437118
Publisher:
Lang, Peter Publishing, Incorporated
Publication date:
10/28/1997
Series:
American University Studies Series
Pages:
271
Product dimensions:
6.33(w) x 9.36(h) x 0.81(d)

Meet the Author

The Author: Jerry Root is currently an assistant professor of French and Comparative Literature at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Michigan.

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