Spaces of Capital: Towards a Critical Geography

Spaces of Capital: Towards a Critical Geography

by David Harvey
     
 

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David Harvey is the most influential geographer of our era, possessing a reputation that extends across the social sciences and humanities. Spaces of Capital, a collection of seminal articles and new essays spanning three decades, demonstrates why his work has had-and continues to have-such a major impact. The book gathers together some of Harvey's best work…  See more details below

Overview

David Harvey is the most influential geographer of our era, possessing a reputation that extends across the social sciences and humanities. Spaces of Capital, a collection of seminal articles and new essays spanning three decades, demonstrates why his work has had-and continues to have-such a major impact. The book gathers together some of Harvey's best work on two of his central concerns: the relationship between geographical thought and political power as well as the capitalist production of space. In addition, he chips away at geography's pretenses of "scientific" neutrality and grounds spatial theory in social justice. Harvey also reflects on the work and careers of little-noticed or misrepresented figures in geography's intellectual history-Kant, Von Thünen, Humboldt, Lattimore, Hegel, Heidegger, Darwin, Malthus, Foucault and many others.

Editorial Reviews

Iris Young
Spanning nearly three decades of work, this collection shows David Harvey as steadfast in his commitments while he keeps up with changing times.
Sharon Zukin
These wise reflections on intellectual movements and political battles of the recent past show why David Harvey has become such an impressive figure of contemporary social critique. His fierce intellectual independence and equally insistent moral decency illuminate a concern for social justice that is primarily economic but extends into every sphere. No other scholar of our day has delved so deeply into the powers of capital to remake space and time, or argued so persuasively to place these processes at teh core of all social thought.
Giovanni Arrighi
David Harvey has done more than anyone else to demonstrate the centrality of geographical space in the evolution of human society under capitalism. He has done so in a constant dialogue with Marx, aware of the need to confront not just Marx's strengths but his weaknesses. Written over twenty-five years, these essays are an invaluable source of ideas on how human geography shapes and is in turn shaped by capitalist development. The book provides an excellent introduction to Harvey's work: it is essential reading for those interested in creative reinterpretations of Marx and in the historical geography of capitalism globally and locally.
Library Journal
Harvey (anthropology, CUNY Graduate Sch.) is one of the most influential geographers of the later 20th century, especially as concerns the relationship among politics, capitalism, and the social aspects of geographical theory. His previous and still cogent works include Explanation in Geography, Social Justice and the City, and Spaces of Hope. His new book provides the daring reader with an introduction to fields of inquiry collectively termed the new geography or critical geography. Harvey delves deeply into the collective psyche of geography as a discipline and attacks long-held assumptions of scientific neutrality within it, particularly in the chapter titled "Population, Resources, and the Ideology of Science." He also gives a chronology of his own geographic thought and his philosophical underpinnings such as Hegel, Marx, Kant, Heidegger, and the like and a unique perspective on capitalism as a driving force in shaping the physical arrangement of societies. Most geographers may take much of this book as an indictment against their chosen field, but Harvey certainly gives us much to consider. Appropriate for larger public libraries and academic libraries. John E. Dockall, Bernice P. Bishop Museum, Honolulu Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781136759154
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
10/12/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
320
File size:
4 MB

Meet the Author

David Harvey is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at the City University of New York Graduate School. He was previously Professor of Geography at both the Johns Hopkins University and Oxford University. His books include Explanation in Geography (1969), Social Justice and the City (1973), The Limits to Capital (1982), The Urban Experience (1988), The Condition of Postmodernity (1989), Justice, Nature and the Geography of Difference (1996) and Spaces of Hope (2000).

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