BN.com Gift Guide

Spaces of Hope / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$30.77
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$22.80
(Save 34%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $17.48
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 49%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $17.48   
  • New (4) from $34.14   
  • Used (6) from $17.48   

Overview

As the twentieth century drew to a close, the rich were getting richer; power was concentrating within huge corporations; vast tracts of the earth were being laid waste; three quarters of the earth's population had no control over its destiny and no claim to basic rights. There was nothing new in this. What was new was the virtual absence of any political will to do anything about it. Spaces of Hope takes issue with this. David Harvey brings an exciting perspective to two of the principal themes of contemporary social discourse: globalization and the body. Exploring the uneven geographical development of late-twentieth-century capitalism, and placing the working body in relation to this new geography, he finds in Marx's writings a wealth of relevant analysis and theoretical insight. In order to make much-needed changes, Harvey maintains, we need to become the architects of a different living and working environment and to learn to bridge the micro-scale of the body and the personal and the macro-scale of global political economy.

Utopian movements have for centuries tried to construct a just society. Harvey looks at their history to ask why they failed and what the ideas behind them might still have to offer. His devastating description of the existing urban environment (Baltimore is his case study) fuels his argument that we can and must use the force of utopian imagining against all who say "there is no alternative." He outlines a new kind of utopian thought, which he calls dialectical utopianism, and refocuses our attention on possible designs for a more equitable world of work and living with nature. If any political ideology or plan is to work, he argues, it must take account of our human qualities. Finally, Harvey dares to sketch a very personal utopian vision in an appendix, one that leaves no doubt about his own geography of hope.

David Harvey is Professor of Geography at the Johns Hopkins University and Miliband Fellow at the London School of Economics. His books include Justice, Nature, and the Geography of Difference (1996), The Condition of Postmodernity (1989), The Urban Experience (1988), The Limits to Capital (1982, reissued 1999), and Social Justice and the City (1973). His work has received critical acclaim and numerous awards on both sides of the Atlantic.

Read More Show Less

What People Are Saying

Derek Gregory
There is no question that David Harvey's work has been one of the most important, influential, and imaginative contributions to the development of human geography since the Second World War. . . . His readings of Marx are arresting and original—a remarkably fresh return to the foundational texts of historical materialism.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

David Harvey is Professor of Geography at the Johns Hopkins University and Miliband Fellow at the London School of Economics. His books include Justice, Nature, and the Geography of Difference (1996), The Condition of Postmodernity (1989), The Urban Experience (1988), The Limits to Capital (1982, reissued 1999), and Social Justice and the City (1973). His work has received critical acclaim and numerous awards on both sides of the Atlantic.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contents
Introduction
1. The difference a generation makes
Part 1 - Uneven geographical developments
2. The geography of the Manifesto
3. 'Working Men of All Countries, Unite!"
4. Contemporary globalization
5. Uneven geographical developments and universal rights
Part 2 - On bodies and political persons in global space
6. The body as an accumulation strategy
7. Body politics and the struggle for a living wage
Part 3 - The utopian movement
8. The spaces of Utopia
9. Dialectical utopianism
Part 4 - Conversations of the plurality of alternatives
10. On architects, bees, and 'species being'
11. Responsibilities towards nature and human nature
12. The insurgent architect at work
Appendix: Edilia, or 'Make of it what you will'
Bibliography
Index
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)