Spatial Neglect: A Clinical Handbook for Diagnosis and Treatment

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Overview

Spatial neglect is a profound clinical problem as well as intriguing scientific problem. In the last ten years, there has been an explosion of interest in this disorder, which as a result is no longer viewed as a single entity, but rather as a number of different disorders. This book is an attempt to bring the reader up to date with the latest advances in understanding neglect, at least insofar as this contributes to better clinical assessment, management and treatment. This is not a book for the specialist researcher in the neuropsychology of neglect and attention. Rather, it is a book aimed at clinicians - student and trained - from all disciplines involved in the assessment, management and treatment of neglect.
The book begins with the description of four cases manifesting different types of unilateral neglect. The reader is introduced to different aspects of neglect through these patients. These distinctions include those between personal and extrapersonal neglect, motor versus sensory neglect and many others. The reader is also introduced to other phenomena that are closely related to neglect, including ansognosia and impaired sustained attention. The latest methodes of assessment of neglect are also described, as are methods of treatment, again with reference to the four introductory specimen cases.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Linda Laatsch
This is a comprehensive description of the clinical presentation and diagnosis of spatial neglect. Although the authors indicate that treatment of spatial neglect will be described, only twenty to thirty pages of the book is dedicated to this purpose. The book is of great use to neurologists and neuropsychologists who will be involved in the diagnosis of individuals with spatial neglect. The syndrome is of great interest because it presents significant hindrances to recovery. The authors have correctly identified the audience for which the book is appropriate. In addition, a wide range of assessment tools generally used in the diagnosis of spatial neglect are discussed. This is valuable to rehabilitation psychologists and neuropsychologists who commonly evaluate patients with acute CVA. In the initial four chapters, various aspects of the syndrome are described in great detail. Because the syndrome presents quite clearly in the patient's drawings, a number of visual illustrations of syndromes from patients with spatial neglect are included. These illustrations are very useful for clinicians early in their education to recognize the diversity of the clinical syndrome when seen in practice. The clinical descriptions are inclusive and very informative. This is a definite strength. A significant number of pages, which are co-authored by Halogen, are dedicated to describing the Behavioral Inattention Test (BIT). It is a test not generally used in the U.S., so a full description of it was interesting. However, some of the tests which are generally used in the U.S. and Canada are not included even though they are generally used by neuropsychologists to asses spatial inattention(Digit Vigilance Test and Traits A & B from the Halstead-Reitan Battery). Inclusion of a larger range of assessment tools would have been helpful. The limited number of pages describing the rehabilitation of spatial neglect was disappointing. In the thorough watch of cognitive rehabilitation literature, a number of ""Class I"" studies were found that demonstrated that visual training using compensation through visual scanning reduced function impairments post-CVA and spatial neglect. As I reviewed the book's reference list, I found that only a portion of these randomized, controlled experimental studies were included. Many of the studies were published in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation during the years of 1977 to 1997. The authors provide limited information on the practical nature of rehabilitation of spatial neglect and readers are left with a sense that systematic efforts to rehabilitate this disability condition is not worth the effort. In the field of cognitive rehabilitation therapy it is generally believed that patients with visual neglect can be taught to compensate for their visual limitations and significant functional improvements will take place given efficient rehabilitation.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Linda Laatsch, PhD (University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine)
Description: This is a comprehensive description of the clinical presentation and diagnosis of spatial neglect.
Purpose: Although the authors indicate that treatment of spatial neglect will be described, only twenty to thirty pages of the book is dedicated to this purpose.
Audience: The book is of great use to neurologists and neuropsychologists who will be involved in the diagnosis of individuals with spatial neglect. The syndrome is of great interest because it presents significant hindrances to recovery. The authors have correctly identified the audience for which the book is appropriate. In addition, a wide range of assessment tools generally used in the diagnosis of spatial neglect are discussed. This is valuable to rehabilitation psychologists and neuropsychologists who commonly evaluate patients with acute CVA.
Features: In the initial four chapters, various aspects of the syndrome are described in great detail. Because the syndrome presents quite clearly in the patient's drawings, a number of visual illustrations of syndromes from patients with spatial neglect are included. These illustrations are very useful for clinicians early in their education to recognize the diversity of the clinical syndrome when seen in practice. The clinical descriptions are inclusive and very informative. This is a definite strength. A significant number of pages, which are co-authored by Halogen, are dedicated to describing the Behavioral Inattention Test (BIT). It is a test not generally used in the U.S., so a full description of it was interesting. However, some of the tests which are generally used in the U.S. and Canada are not included even though they are generally used by neuropsychologists to asses spatial inattention (Digit Vigilance Test and Traits A & B from the Halstead-Reitan Battery). Inclusion of a larger range of assessment tools would have been helpful. The limited number of pages describing the rehabilitation of spatial neglect was disappointing. In the thorough watch of cognitive rehabilitation literature, a number of "Class I" studies were found that demonstrated that visual training using compensation through visual scanning reduced function impairments post-CVA and spatial neglect. As I reviewed the book's reference list, I found that only a portion of these randomized, controlled experimental studies were included. Many of the studies were published in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation during the years of 1977 to 1997.
Assessment: The authors provide limited information on the practical nature of rehabilitation of spatial neglect and readers are left with a sense that systematic efforts to rehabilitate this disability condition is not worth the effort. In the field of cognitive rehabilitation therapy it is generally believed that patients with visual neglect can be taught to compensate for their visual limitations and significant functional improvements will take place given efficient rehabilitation.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780863778100
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 2/13/2001
  • Series: Brain, Behaviour and Cognition Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 172
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.37 (d)

Table of Contents

Clinical Presentation of Visual Neglect. Clinical Issues for the Understanding of Neglect. Assessment of Visual Neglect. Assessment of Neglect and Related Phenomena. Natural Recovery, Variability and Early Attempts to Treat Neglect. Alternative Attempts to Treat Visual Neglect.

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