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Speak Like Churchill, Stand Like Lincoln: 21 Powerful Secrets of History's Greatest Speakers
     

Speak Like Churchill, Stand Like Lincoln: 21 Powerful Secrets of History's Greatest Speakers

4.1 16
by James C. Humes
 

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Turn Any Presentation into a Landmark Occasion
Ever wish you could captivate your boardroom with the opening line of your presentation, like Winston Churchill in his most memorable speeches? Or want to command attention by looming larger than life before your audience, much like Abraham Lincoln when, standing erect and wearing a top hat, he towered over

Overview

Turn Any Presentation into a Landmark Occasion
Ever wish you could captivate your boardroom with the opening line of your presentation, like Winston Churchill in his most memorable speeches? Or want to command attention by looming larger than life before your audience, much like Abraham Lincoln when, standing erect and wearing a top hat, he towered over seven feet? Now, you can master presentation skills, wow your audience, and shoot up the corporate ladder by unlocking the secrets of history's greatest speakers.

Author, historian, and world-renowned speaker James C. Humes—who wrote speeches for five American presidents—shows you how great leaders through the ages used simple yet incredibly effective tricks to speak, persuade, and win throngs of fans and followers. Inside, you'll discover how Napoleon Bonaparte mastered the use of the pregnant pause to grab attention, how Lady Margaret Thatcher punctuated her most serious speeches with the use of subtle props, how Ronald Reagan could win even the most hostile crowd with carefully timed wit, and much, much more.

Whether you're addressing a small nation or a large staff meeting, you'll want to master the tips and tricks in Speak Like Churchill, Stand Like Lincoln.
"As a student of speech, I very much enjoyed this intriguing historic approach to public speaking. Humes creates a valuable and practical guide."
Roger Ailes, chairman and CEO, FOX News

"I love this book. I've followed Humes's lessons for years, and he combines them all into one compact, hard-hitting resource. Get this book on your desk now."
Chris Matthews, Hardball


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

Forbes
Companies with straightforward business plans, which executives explain clearly to the public, are to be prized. Avoid those that make things complex.

Sir Winston Churchill said: "A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject." I'm fa-natical about brevity. In his new book, Speak Like Churchill, Stand Like Lincoln (Crown, $14), James Humes describes the techniques of history's most renowned speakers, pointing out that Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address--which might win a poll as the greatest speech ever delivered--made a compelling case for the Civil War in only two minutes.

Some people think complex plans and longer explanations are just better. Aside from wasting precious time, a long, disjointed message is often laden with overstatement and useless information. Brevity is honest. A pointed mes-sage is more compelling, persuasive and certainly more memorable. I trust the short and sharp and am suspicious of the verbose.

Public speaking, architecture and even accessorizing are all better when simple. The same is true for investing. In my experience the companies with the simplest stories are the ones that thrive over the long term. Warren Buffett has famously advised to buy what you know.

I try to avoid stocks with convoluted business strategies as well as chief executives who seek to impress with voluminous reports and long-winded presentations.

I call myself "the patient investor," but we all have our limits. Aside from the accounting fraud and other ethi-cal lapses that later came to light, in its heyday Enron was a bad investment idea. Who could grasp how all those energy trades created profits? Quantum physics is probably moreunderstandable. The same goes for a conglomerate like Tyco. Again, disregard the dubious goings-on under previous management. How can investors wrap their minds around com-panies with hundreds of subsidiaries ranging from undersea cable to fire equipment?

The following companies are artfully succinct in their clear missions, straightforward business models and plainspoken communications:

An old industry play on the new economy, DeVry (16) has built an empire on simplifying the complex. DeVry is one of the U.S.' largest publicly held higher education companies and, as a vendor of technical and business school-ing, it presents a conservative foray into technology for skittish investors. The company has 22 undergraduate DeVry campuses in the U.S. and 2 in Canada. Additionally, it operates the Keller Graduate School of Management, which ac-counts for 20% of DeVry University's 55,961 students.

Also, DeVry's Becker Conviser Professional Review Program provides coursework for professional certifica-tion exams, including the certified public accountant, certified management accountant and chartered financial analyst examinations. With students like theirs you can bet DeVry keeps a clean balance sheet. DeVry sells for 17 times trailing earnings, 19 times forward earnings and at a 33% discount to my $24 estimation of its intrinsic worth.

Park Place Entertainment (8) makes business out of pleasure. The world's largest casino gaming company--it derived its name from the coveted property on the Monopoly board--Park Place operates two dozen resorts in five coun-tries. In Las Vegas the company's prime properties include Caesars Palace, Paris, the Flamingo, Bally's and the Hilton. The company also owns casinos in Atlantic City and abroad.

Cash flows freely at Park Place. In fact, the house took in $299 million in free cash flow (in the sense of net in-come plus depreciation minus capital spending) in the 12 months ended Sept. 30. That's equal to $1 per share. Park Place goes for 19 times trailing earnings and 13 times forward earnings. It, too, is at a 33% discount to my estimate of its intrinsic worth.

Tricon Global Restaurants wanted its name to say it all and thus rechristened itself Yum Brands (23). In sales, Yum is the second-largest fast-food company in the world and is the corporate equivalent of a food court, catering to different tastes by housing multiple restaurant brands under one roof. Yum's chains are KFC, Pizza Hut, Taco Bell, Long John Silver's and A&W. This simple, diversified strategy is Yum's competitive advantage. Multibranding has helped make the company the fast-food industry's leader in terms of number of locations, with 30,000 restaurants worldwide, and gives it elbow room for further international expansion.

Yum Brands is the cheapest of my recommendations here: 12 times trailing earnings, 11 times forward earn-ings and a 26% discount to its $31 intrinsic value.

John W. Rogers Jr. is chairman and chief executive officer of Chicago-based Ariel Capital Management, Inc., the adviser to the Ariel Mutual Funds. Visit his home page at www.forbes.com/rogers.
—John W. Rogers Jr.

From the Publisher
"As a student of speech, I very much enjoyed this intriguing historic approach to public speaking. Humes creates a valuable and practical guide."
—Roger Ailes, chairman and CEO, FOX News

"I love this book. I've followed Humes's lessons for years, and he combines them all into one compact, hard-hitting resource. Get this book on your desk now."
—Chris Matthews, Hardball

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307559913
Publisher:
Crown/Archetype
Publication date:
02/19/2009
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
317,460
File size:
2 MB

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
"I love this book. I've followed Humes's lessons for years, and he combines them all into one compact, hard-hitting resource. Get this book on your desk now." —-Chris Matthews

Meet the Author

James C. Humes, a professor of language and leadership at the University of Southern Colorado, is the author of numerous books, including Nixon's Ten Commandments of Leadership and Negotiation, Confessions of a White House Ghostwriter, and The Wit and Wisdom of Winston Churchill. He served briefly in Eisenhower's White House and was a speaker, in London, for ceremonies commemorating Churchill's 125th birthday. Mr. Humes lives in Pueblo, Colorado.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Speak Like Churchill, Stand Like Lincoln: 21 Powerful Secrets of History's Greatest Speakers 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
GigMaster More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent book written in a concise format that gets right to the point on how to improve your public speaking skills. It is full of outstanding examples from the titans of public speaking: Churchill and Lincoln, and many others. It is insightful in its analysis of exactly why certain approaches work. The techniques are easy to grasp and easy to implement with practice. A must read for anyone interested in public speaking.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This has been an absolutely essential guide for me since 2007!  I had no experience as a public speaker when I wrote my first speech. The techniques that the author describes are extremely effective and have enabled me to create and deliver some very successful speeches as a cancer survivor and research advocate. I highly recommend this book.  
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Guest More than 1 year ago
James Humes rightly emphasizes the importance of being an efficient communicator for all avenues of life. Humes gives his audience 21 tips that he has identified through a meticulous examination of some memorable quotations attributed to famous politicians and writers. Speakers can stand out in front of a crowd or among a small group of people by applying these tips to their presentation. Why bore an audience by telling a lengthy joke at the beginning of a speech, inviting the audience to fall asleep though a windy talk and busy slides or ending a presentation on a flat note? Instead why not speak about a personal experience to which the audience can relate, energize a talk by the use of a memorable bon mot or end a talk on a strong note? No one needs to be one of the famous people quoted in this book to come up with a striking note that makes the difference between a boring speaker and a riveting one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a fabulous book. If your interested in public speaking or enhancing your communication skills, then this book is for you. These 21 secrets will revolutonize your dialoge. The author uses methods of some of histories most prominent communicators such as: Winston Churchhill, Abraham Lincoln, Bill Clinton, and Ronald Reagon. This is truley a spectacular book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I no longer have to wait....the day has come and he has returned....we are all together again...like a family.... have you ever loved someone? Idk...maybe wanted to date that person but felt like they never noticed?