Special Edition Using Microsoft Office XP

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With this edition of Special Edition Using Office XP there is a continual emphasis on realistic applications and uses of the program features. While there are many other big books in the Office market today, there are few that tailor coverage uniquely for the intermediate to advanced Office user as Special Edition Using does, delivering more focused value for the customer. It has been updated to reflect Office XP's Smart tags, collaboration features, speech and dictation tools, built-in recovery features, "add ...

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Overview

With this edition of Special Edition Using Office XP there is a continual emphasis on realistic applications and uses of the program features. While there are many other big books in the Office market today, there are few that tailor coverage uniquely for the intermediate to advanced Office user as Special Edition Using does, delivering more focused value for the customer. It has been updated to reflect Office XP's Smart tags, collaboration features, speech and dictation tools, built-in recovery features, "add network place" wizard and much more

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Office XP can do just about everything -- but it doesn't do everything with equal competence or elegance. You want a book that tells you both the good stuff and the bad stuff, and shows you practical ways to work around the bad stuff. Ed Bott and Woody Leonhard have written that book.

Bott and Leonhard assume Office is the key tool of your working life: You're no beginner (though, like everyone else, you're new to the latest version). Their goal is to help you unearth the features and techniques that can do the most for your productivity -- features that are often buried well under the surface. For example, you'll learn how to use Outlook's email filtering tools to cope with the flood of email messages you're getting, how to store custom Excel chart types so you can reuse the formatting you've laboriously created, and how to create a shortcut that automatically publishes your files to a web server whenever you click Save.

Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook are covered in the greatest detail. Bott and Leonhard cover Access and FrontPage in somewhat less depth, but they still hit the high points -- and, even here, some of the tips could pay for the book. (Don't waste your time building input masks manually in Access: there's a well-hidden Wizard that transforms this arduous task into child's play.)

As most Office users realize, there are a batch of shared "applets" available to all (or most) Office programs. Bott and Leonhard do a nice job with these -- including new capabilities such as Microsoft Office Document Scanning. The book concludes with a well-done introduction to VBA, Office's shared programming language. One nice touch here: more than a dozen snippets of working code that handle a surprising number of the tasks you're likely to be interested in.

Buy the book, and you're eligible to download a free (unlimited) copy of WOPR, Woody Leonhard's nifty library of add-on tools for Office XP. Previous versions sold for $49.99, so it's a pretty nice bonus. (Bill Camarda)

Bill Camarda is a consultant and writer with nearly 20 years' experience in helping technology companies deploy and market advanced software, computing, and networking products and services. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks For Dummies®, Second Edition.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780789725134
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 5/28/2001
  • Series: Special Edition Using Series
  • Edition description: SPECIAL
  • Pages: 1184
  • Product dimensions: 7.33 (w) x 9.09 (h) x 2.39 (d)

Meet the Author

Ed Bott is an award-winning computer journalist and one of the most widely recognized voices in the computing world, with nearly two decades of experience as a writer and editor at leading magazines such as PC World and PC Computing. Currently, he is Senior Contributing Editor for Smart Business (formerly PC Computing), a 1999 National Magazine Award winner with a monthly circulation of more than 1 million. On the Web, Ed is the Guide to Windows for About - The Human Internet (windows.about), one of the Internet's leading resources for news, information, and entertainment; he also writes a weekly column for TechRepublic. He is the author of a long list of Que books covering Microsoft Windows and Office, including Special Edition Using Microsoft Office 2000, Practical Windows 2000, Special Edition Using Windows 98, and Platinum Edition Using Windows 98, and two editions of Using Windows 95. In all, Ed has reached more than 650,000 Windows and Office users through his unique combination of expert knowledge and friendly, down-to-earth style.

Woody Leonhard publishes Woody's Office Watch, a weekly electronic newsletter infamous in Office circles for breaking important news first, and holding Microsoft's feet to the fire. Woody is also a longtime contributing editor at PC Computing. He specializes in lively, technically accurate, no-bull books and columns on Office and Windows. Woody has won an unprecedented six Computer Press Awards for his books, newsletters, and magazine articles. He is also the author of Woody Teaches Microsoft Office 2000 and Woody Teaches Microsoft Office 97.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 3: Office File Management for Experts

In this chapter:

Setting Up Office File Storage Locations

Creating New Files

Using and Customizing Common Dialog Boxes

Storing Document Details

Searching for Office Files

Working with Multiple Files

Setting Up Automatic Backup and Recovery Options

Troubleshooting

Secrets of the Office Masters: Details, Details

Setting Up Office File Storage Locations

Office XP works especially well in the typical well-connected office, making it easy to store and retrieve Office files in a wide variety of locations. You might keep some files on your local hard disk, others on a network file server, and still others on a Web server with Microsoft's SharePoint extensions installed. In an environment this complex, having a well-thought-out storage system is the only way to stay organized.

Choosing a Default Local Storage Location

Three Office versions ago, Microsoft introduced the My Documents folder. The idea was simple: to create a default location for personal data files, making it easier for users to find and back up files they create. In practice, however, the first implementations of this idea were poorly thought out, and most expert Office users simply ignored the My Documents icon on the desktop—or quickly figured out how to delete it. Since its first appearance in 1995, the My Documents folder has evolved into a standard feature of Windows; if you deleted the My Documents folder supplied by Office, you might have been startled to see it reappear when you upgraded Windows. Beginning with Windows 98, in fact, and continuing with Windows ME, 2000, and XP, the My Documents folder has become an integral part of Windows, and that icon on the Windows desktop and in the My Computer window is much more useful.

Office XP makes extensive use of the My Documents folder. Advanced users might cringe at the name, but this system folder is the default starting point for common Open and Save As dialog boxes in Office applications. It's also hard-wired to one of the default icons on the Places Bar in those dialog boxes. If you're willing to reorganize the way you store data files to take advantage of this location, you can substantially increase the odds that you'll find files you're looking for when you need them. You can also change the default location that individual Office programs use for data files; it's slightly more difficult, but still possible, to redefine the location of the My Documents folder. (Oh, and if the name bugs you, just change it.)

The exact physical location of the My Documents folder varies, depending on which Windows version you have installed:

  • On a system running Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me without user profiles, the My Documents folder appears in the root of the system drive, usually C:\My Documents.

  • On a system running Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me with user profiles enabled, the My Documents folder appears in the user's local profile folder, typically C:\Windows\Profiles\<username>\My Documents. (Note that you can override this option by clearing a check box in the Users dialog box of the Control Panel.)

  • On a system running Windows NT 4.0 or earlier, the My Documents shortcut opens the Personal folder in the user's local profile, typically C:\Winnt\Profiles\<username>\Personal.

  • On a system running Windows 2000 and XP, the My Documents folder appears in the Documents and Settings folder, normally C:\Documents and Settings\<username>\My Documents.

Tip

If you use Windows 98 or Windows Me, you can safely (and quickly) eliminate the My Documents icon from the desktop: Right-click the icon and choose Remove from Desktop. Because this icon is only a shortcut with a few special properties, eliminating it does not have any effect on files stored in the physical folder to which it points. To restore the My Documents icon to the desktop on a Windows 98 system, right-click any empty space on the desktop and choose New, My Documents Folder on Desktop. In Windows Me, open the Folder Options dialog box, click the View tab, and check the Show My Documents on the Desktop box.

In all 32-bit versions except Windows 95 and NT 4.0, the My Documents icon on the desktop and in Explorer windows is actually a shell extension—a virtual folder like the My Computer and Network Neighborhood icons, not an actual physical location. Opening this shortcut opens the folder that's registered as the current user's My Documents location. To change the folder that this icon points to, right-click the My Documents icon, choose Properties, and enter the folder name in the Target text box.

Tip

Changing the default file location in FrontPage 2002 requires hacking the Registry. Navigate to the following key: HEKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\FrontPage and change the value DefaultSave to the full path of the folder you want to use.

Then, open the following key:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Frontpage\Explorer\FrontPage Explorer\Settings and change the value for Default\WebName to the same folder name.

Finally, you can change the default working folder for any individual Office application (with the exception of FrontPage), although the exact procedure is slightly different, depending on the program you're working with. Follow these steps, for example, to adjust the default document folder in Word:

  1. Choose Tools, Options, and click the File Locations tab. The dialog box shown in Figure 3.1 lets you specify a wide range of system folders.

  2. In the File Types list, select the Documents option.

  3. Click the Modify button; then use the Modify Location dialog box to browse through drives and folders. Select the correct folder and click OK.

  4. Click OK to close the Options dialog box and save your change.

Use the Options dialog box to adjust the default working folder for any Office program.

Follow the same basic procedure for Excel, PowerPoint, and Access, with the following exceptions: In Excel and Access, click the General tab; in PowerPoint, click the Save tab. In the box labeled Default File Location, enter the full name and path of the folder that you want to specify as the new default. Unfortunately, only Word lets you browse through drives and folders to find the one you want; with all other Office programs, you must enter the full directory path manually.

The default file location setting for each application is independent. If you set Word's default Documents folder to a location on the network, for example, Excel and PowerPoint continue to open to the default My Documents folder.

Tip

Curiously, several other settings in Word's File Locations dialog box apply across the board to all Office applications. If you change the location of the Templates or Workgroup Templates folder in Word, that change applies to Excel and PowerPoint as well. Specifying the Workgroup Templates folder here is an ideal way to make sure that individual users always have access to the most current corporate templates in the three main Office applications. Users can continue to save and open personal templates in their own folders, but any Word, Excel, or PowerPoint template in the Workgroup Templates folder will "automagically" appear in the New dialog box of all three applications.

Behind the scenes, Office creates and uses one additional standard location, creating a group of subfolders in the Application Data folder. On a default Windows 98/Me setup without user profiles, you'll find these files at C:\Windows\Application Data\Microsoft. With user profiles enabled, this location is typically C:\Windows\Profiles\<username>\Application Data\Microsoft or, in Windows 2000/XP, at C:\Documents and Settings\<username>\Application Data\Microsoft. Office keeps separate folders for each application, special-purpose folders for use by all Office programs, and a folder for Office itself. This location is where Office stores customization data, such as your Excel Personal macro workbook, any custom templates that you create in any program (stored in the Templates folder), custom dictionaries (in the Proof folder), and Word startup templates (in the \Word\STARTUP folder).

Opening and Saving Files Over a Network

Office XP lets you work with files over a network or on the Web in much the same way that you access files and folders on a standalone PC. If you are connected to a network, contact your network administrator to find locations on the network where you're permitted to read or write files. You should get a network share address for the location, using UNC syntax (\\Server_name\Share_Name\). Unless the network administrator has restricted your rights, you can create and manage your own subfolders in this location.

Although you can type UNC-style network addresses directly into File Open or File Save As dialog boxes, doing so is usually more trouble than it's worth. For easier access, browse to the My Network Places folder (in older Windows versions, this is the Network Neighborhood) and navigate to the correct server, share, and folder.

Aside from the additional navigation steps, there is no difference between using network shares and using local drives, assuming that you have proper authorization from your network administrator.

Storing Files on the Web or an Intranet

Storing files on the Web—whether to a Web server or to an FTP server—is almost as simple as working with files on a local network. As long as you're connected to the Web, you need only the URL for the location (for example, http://www.mydomain.com/someplace or ftp://microsoft.com/incoming) and approval from the site operator to read or write to the location. You can even copy the URL from your favorite Web browser's Address box and paste it into the File Name box.

To open or save a file to a Web server or an FTP site on the Internet or an intranet, display the New Document/Worksheet/Presentation task pane and click Add Network Place (at the bottom of the pane). Follow the steps in the Add Network Place Wizard to create a shortcut to the location (see Figure 3.2).

The Add Network Place Wizard lets you set up Internet or intranet locations so that they work just like regular folders.

You can also reach the Add Network Place Wizard from the My Network Places or Network Neighborhood icons in any common dialog box.

Note

From a technical standpoint, there are almost no differences between publishing to an intranet Web server and publishing to one on the Internet. The format of the URL that you use likely will be different—intranet servers are typically identified with a one-word name (such as http://marketing) rather than a fully qualified domain name (such as http://www.example.com). You'll likely encounter different security issues, including password-protected logins and possibly disk quotas (which limit the amount of disk space that a user can fill with Web content) on both types of server.

Working with Shared Folders on a SharePoint Server

Some editions of Office XP include an add-on called SharePoint Team Services. This software is a stripped-down version of a more powerful package called SharePoint Portal Server. You can install the SharePoint Team Services add-in on any Windows 2000/XP machine that is also running Internet Information Services. With a SharePoint server available (usually on an intranet), co-workers can share and discuss files on a Web server, using an attractive Web-based front end.

Office XP integrates exceptionally well with SharePoint servers. Depending on how the SharePoint administrator has configured the network, you can access SharePoint document libraries directly from Office XP common dialog boxes. Any document stored on a SharePoint server is available for Web Discussions as well. Use the My Network Places folder from an Office Open or Save As dialog box to work directly with a SharePoint shared folder.

Creating New Files

When you use the New File task pane or New dialog box to select from available templates in Word, Excel, or PowerPoint, Office builds the tabbed dialog box on the fly from two (and, in some cases, three) sources:

  • The default collection of Office templates is stored in a subfolder that corresponds to the system's current language settings; on a default U.S. English installation, this is C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Templates\1033. All users of the current system see these templates.

  • Each user's custom templates are stored in the location specified for User Templates. On a Windows 98/Me machine with user profiles enabled, this is C:\Windows\Profiles\<username>\Application Data\Microsoft\Templates; on a Windows 2000/XP machine, it's C:\Documents and Settings\<username>\Application Data\Microsoft\Templates. The actual location can be changed in Word's File Locations dialog box, accessible by choosing Tools, Options, and, on the File Locations tab, clicking User Templates and then Modify.

  • If you've used Word's File Locations dialog box to specify a Workgroup Templates folder, Office displays templates from this location in the New dialog box as well. If a template in the Workgroup Templates location and one in the User Templates location have the same name, the Office program displays and uses only the one from the User Templates location.

Note

The default Office installation does not install all available templates; instead, you'll find shortcuts to some templates in the task pane and New dialog box. The first time you use one of these templates, Office attempts to install the supporting files. Word, Excel, and PowerPoint templates are covered in Chapter 18, "Using Styles, Templates, and Themes"; Chapter 21, "Excel Essentials"; and Chapter 28, "PowerPoint Essentials," respectively.

If you're having trouble finding templates that you've saved, see "Putting Templates in Their Place" in the "Troubleshooting" section at the end of this chapter.

For more details on how to install templates and other Office components, see "Adding and Removing Office Features."

Although you can manage the contents of template folders in an Explorer window, the easiest and safest way to make new templates available to an Office program is to save the file in Template format. After creating the Word document, Excel workbook, or PowerPoint presentation that you want to use as a template, follow these steps:

  1. Choose File, Save As.

  2. From the Save As Type drop-down list, choose Document Template (Word), Template (Excel), or Design Template (PowerPoint). The dialog box displays the contents of your User Templates folder.

  3. To add the new template to one of the existing tabs, click the Create New Folder button and add a folder with the same name as the existing tab. If you want to create a custom tab for the New File task pane and New dialog box, specify a new folder name. If you don't select a subfolder here, your new template will appear under General templates on the New File task pane or on the General tab of the New dialog box.

  4. Type a name for the template and click Save.

Using and Customizing Common Dialog Boxes

The Office File Open and File Save As dialog boxes have a series of shortcut icons on the left side, called the Places Bar (see Figure 3.3), designed to speed navigation through common file locations:

The Places Bar on the left of the Open and Save As dialog boxes can be easily customized. Put commonly used data folders here for quicker access....

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Table of Contents

I Common Tasks and Features
1 An Overview of Office XP 11
2 Customizing the Office Interface 27
3 Office File Management for Experts 55
4 Editing and Formatting Text 81
5 Creating and Editing Professional-Quality Graphics 107
6 Sharing Data Between Office Applications 131
7 Using Office on the Web 151
8 Sharing Office Documents 171
II Using Outlook
9 Outlook Essentials 189
10 Expert E-mail Management 237
11 Tracking Appointments and Tasks 271
12 Managing a Contacts List 293
13 Sharing Schedules and Planning Meetings 313
III Using Word
14 Word Essentials 329
15 Expert Text-Editing Techniques 363
16 Advanced Document Formatting 401
17 Using Tables 443
18 Using Styles, Templates, and Themes 465
19 Creating Dynamic Documents with Fields and Forms 487
20 Merging Data and Documents 513
IV Using Excel
21 Excel Essentials 533
22 Advanced Worksheet Formatting 573
23 Using Formulas and Functions 607
24 Creating and Editing Charts 645
25 Working with Lists and Databases 673
26 Using Excel in a Workgroup 703
27 Using PivotTables and PivotCharts 723
V Using PowerPoint
28 PowerPoint Essentials 745
29 Expert Presentation-Building Techniques 767
30 Advanced Formatting Options 789
31 Adding Graphics, Multimedia, and Special Effects 817
32 Planning and Delivering a Presentation 841
VI Other Office Applications
33 Access Essentials 857
34 Customizing Tables, Forms, and Reports 875
35 Entering, Finding, and Filtering Data 895
36 FrontPage Essentials 915
37 Developing and Managing a Web Site 941
VII Automating Office with Macros and VBA
38 Using Macros to Automate Office Tasks 963
39 Working with Visual Basic for Applications 985
40 Building Custom Applications with VBA 1005
41 Advanced VBA Tools and Techniques 1033
App. A: Advanced Setup Options 1059
App. B What's on Que's WOPR XP/2002 Pack 1077
Index 1083
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