Special Edition Using Windows 98

Special Edition Using Windows 98

by Ed Bott
     
 

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Special Edition Using Windows 98 provides you with the most comprehensive, relevant and understandable reference to Windows 98. This new edition features complete coverage of all new Windows 98 features including Internet Explorer 4.0, the Active Desktop, and Shell Integration. The book is two color, features a new, more effective design, handy task-reference tear

Overview

Special Edition Using Windows 98 provides you with the most comprehensive, relevant and understandable reference to Windows 98. This new edition features complete coverage of all new Windows 98 features including Internet Explorer 4.0, the Active Desktop, and Shell Integration. The book is two color, features a new, more effective design, handy task-reference tear cards, a wealth of productivity-boosting tips, notes and cautions as well as a very strong collection of valuable software on the CD-ROM.

  • Professional, time-saving techniques and expert advice on all aspects of Windows 98
  • Enhance your work and computing experience with the new multimedia features
  • Learn to build your own peer-to-peer network

Editorial Reviews

The Barnes & Noble Review
Two best-selling authors have teamed up to offers this comprehensive, relevant, and clearly written reference to the Windows 98 operating system, complete with valuable software on CD-ROM for optimum coverage of Windows 98 expert-level capabilities. Learn how to: *Take advantage of time-saving techniques on all aspects of Windows 98 *Enhance your work with the new multimedia features *Build your own peer-to-peer network *Browse the World Wide Web more efficiently *Create Web pages and extended desktops *Connect your Windows 98 machine to Netware and Windows NT networks *Configure Active Desktop to bring Web content to your desktop CD-ROM includes: *The exclusive Macmillan Computer Publishing Windows 98 Knowledge Base *Windows 98 vendor resource kit *Registry tools, system utilities, graphics programs, and many other software programs to help you fine-tune, customize, and maintain your Windows 98 system
Booknews
For intermediate to advanced users, offers a storehouse of information for optimizing Windows 98 in a large home or small office. In addition to basic Windows topics (working with files and applications, configuring and customizing, the registry, and Windows accessories), covers special features for notebook users, Web browsing and downloading, Internet security, creating Web pages with FrontPage Express, setting up a simple network, remote access, and Microsoft Fax. The CD-ROM includes resources and utilities. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780789714886
Publisher:
Que
Publication date:
05/28/1998
Series:
Special Edition Using Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
912
Product dimensions:
7.39(w) x 9.08(h) x 2.33(d)

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Read an Excerpt


Chapter 13: Printing

Setting Up a Network Printer

Setting up a network printer in Windows 98 can be as easy as connecting to a local printer, thanks in part to Microsoft's Point and Print process. This process usually allows you to automatically install the correct network printer driver without having to have the Windows 98 CD-ROM or other disk containing the printer driver. Through Point and Print, when you use the Add Printer Wizard to add a network printer, Windows 98 is often able to download the printer driver from the computer or server to which the printer is attached.

Before attempting to set up a network printer on your computer, you first need to know how to connect to the printer. Some of the information you need to know is

  • The name that the printer and its attached computer or server (if applicable) uses on the network
  • If the printer is set up for sharing over the network
  • The exact model of that printer; for example, HP LaserJet 5

Connecting to the Network

To install a network printer on your computer, you first need to be connected to the network. If you have not already established a network connection with your computer, refer to Chapter 37, "Sharing Network Resources," before attempting to connect to and install a network printer. You might also need to check with your network administrator to make sure that you have been given permission to access that printer, because the printer may refuse your connection if you do not have permission.

While being connected to your network, open the Printers folder and double-click on the Add Printer icon. The Add Printer Wizard then appears. Select the radio button for Network Printer and click the Next button.

You are then asked to supply the location of the printer on the network. If you already know the name of the printer and its attached computer on the network, you can simply type it into the field on this screen, as shown in Figure 13.6. Note that you need to supply the UNC (Universal Naming Convention) path for the location of the printer, such as \\computername\printername where computername is the name of the computer to which the printer is attached, and printername is the name of the printer. Thus, in Figure 13.6, Main is the name of the computer on the network to which the printer hp5 is attached.

If you are not sure of the exact name of the computer and printer on the network, click on the Browse button. This brings up a separate window (see Figure 13.7) that lists all other computers on the network that have shared printers.

Click on the plus sign to the left of any computer listed in this window to expand the view to show all shared printers attached to that computer. Click on the OK button after you have selected the printer you want to add.

Before you move on to the next window in the Add Printer Wizard, be sure to check the correct radio button indicating if you want to print from MS-DOS-based programs. If you select yes and click on the Next button, the next window of the wizard requests that you capture a printer port for these MS-DOS programs. Even though this shared network printer is not physically attached to your computer, MS-DOS programs often need to believe that they are printing to a local port. By choosing a port to capture for this purpose, when MS-DOS programs attempt to print to this port, Windows 98 redirects the print job to the network printer automatically.

As with local printers, the Add Printer Wizard asks you if you want to print a test page. Select the Yes radio button if you want to see if your connection to the network printer is working properly. After you have decided if you want to print a test page, press the Finish button to install the printer on your computer.

After you have selected the network printer you want to install and have finished with the Add Printer Wizard, Windows 98 then connects to that printer to determine its exact type. After it has determined the make and model of the printer, Windows 98 then sees if you already have a correct version of that printer's driver available on your computer. If you do, the printer should install correctly, and you will be done adding this printer to your Printers folder. In most cases, however, Windows 98 either downloads the correct driver to your computer or you are prompted to insert a disk containing the driver into one of your disk drives.

To address both of these situations, we begin by looking at what happens when Windows 98 is able to download the printer driver to your computer.

Point and Print

After you have finished using the Add Printer Wizard, Windows 98 attempts to install the printer driver from the computer to which the printer is attached (if applicable). In many cases, if the shared printer is set up correctly on the computer to which it is attached, Windows 98 can download the printer driver from that computer and install it on your computer. This feature is known as Point and Print.

Assuming that this process works correctly on your computer, you should see a dialog box telling you that Windows 98 has found the proper driver on the remote computer and is installing the driver on your computer. After this has finished, you can connect to and use that printer.

In order for the Point and Print feature to work properly, the computer to which the shared printer is attached must be running Windows 98, Windows NT Server, or be a Novell NetWare server. Note, however, that this feature does not always work properly, and as such you may still have to install the printer driver from either the Windows 98 CD-ROM or the printer driver disk supplied by your printer manufacturer.

Installing Printer Drivers from Disk

If you are unable to install the driver for your printer through the Point and Print feature described in the previous section, you will need to use the Windows 98 CD-ROM or another disk with the appropriate driver in order to provide Windows 98 with the printer driver. After Windows 98 installs the printer driver, an icon for the printer appears in your Printers folder.

Printing from Applications

After you have installed one or more printers on your computer, you then can print from within any application. In Windows 98, when you print from a Windows application, you can change a number of the printer's configurations within the application itself for the print job you are processing. Windows 98 also includes a print spooler that allows you to get back to work while the operating system processes the print job in the background....

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