Speeches, correspondence and political papers of Carl Schurz Volume 5

Speeches, correspondence and political papers of Carl Schurz Volume 5

by Carl Schurz
     
 

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people as his greatest legacy, stand as the soberest, the most practical, the wisest and at the same time, as, in the highest sense, the most idealistic utterance that ever… See more details below

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
people as his greatest legacy, stand as the soberest, the most practical, the wisest and at the same time, as, in the highest sense, the most idealistic utterance that ever came from an American statesman. And now, to close the proceedings of the evening, for which I cannot thank you too much, and which, so long as I live, will be one of my proudest and most cherished memories, raise your glasses and drink to the sentiment I offer you: Our country, the great Republic of the United States of America. May it ever prosper and flourish as the government of, for and by the people; as the home of free and happy generations, and as an example and guiding star to all mankind! TO CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS, JR. New York, March u, 1899. I should have thanked you for your letter of the 5th more promptly had I not all these days been literally pursued by kindness. It was exceedingly gratifying to me personally, but it interfered very much with my regular occupations, and especially with my correspondence. What you say of the character and spirit of the banquet of March 2d is undoubtedly true. It was indeed a demonstration of the unrepresented. The only power to counteract the faults and evil tendencies of political organization in our political concerns consists in the influence which the unrepresented may still exercise upon public opinion; and that influence counts after all for a great deal. I am, for instance, not at all without hope that persevering discussion may at last defeat the imperialistic policy. That policy would certainly be defeated if theDemocratic party could get rid of the silver nonsense. But even if that should not happen, the agitation in favor of a conservative policy may be made so strong as to frighten the Republican leaders out of their present concei...

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781623766894
Publisher:
Best Books On Corporation
Publication date:
09/21/2013
Edition description:
Best Books Edition
Pages:
425
Product dimensions:
8.10(w) x 12.00(h) x 1.80(d)

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would feel disinclined to make without it, I am certainly willing to serve as suggested by him in furnishing that opportunity. I will only add that I should be most happy to see the widespread belief as to the corrupt use of large sums of money in the last Presidential election effectually dispelled by the best possible proof that the campaign funds have been expended for legitimate purposes. And if I can be instrumental in eliciting such proof, I shall consider it a service to the good name of the country which will be to me a source of the sincerest satisfaction. It is in this spirit that I address you, and the first question I have to ask, is, of course, whether the writer in Harper's Weekly, in calling for this letter, really represented your views and wishes. TO THOMAS F. BAYARD New York, Feb. 27, 1889. I have read the protocol with keen interest and cannot refrain from saying that the American side of the question has been represented by you with the most decided and unquestionable superiority in point of argument as well as vigor of debate. I do not wonder that those among your adversaries who still have some respect for the truth were silenced by the appearance of this document. I saw a statement in the papers a few days ago that the German Government had formally demanded the prosecution and punishment of Klein, and that you had sent the correspondence concerning this demand, to the Senate. Can you, consistently, tell me whether this is true? Will you be kind enough to cause a copy of the correspondence concerning the Sackville case' to be mailed tome? You will add to the many obligations under which I am to you. 1 Lord Sackville was the British Minister at Washingtonduring the National campaign of 1888, when the Republicans were very eager toattract...

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