Sphere

Sphere

4.4 194
by Michael Crichton, Edward Asner
     
 

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In the middle of the South Pacific, 1,000 feet below the surface, a huge spaceship is discovered resting on the ocean floor. It is a craft of phenomenal dimensions, it seems undamaged by its fall from the sky, and it appears to be at least three hundred years old. Rushed to the scene is a group of American scientists who investigate this astonishing discovery. What

Overview

In the middle of the South Pacific, 1,000 feet below the surface, a huge spaceship is discovered resting on the ocean floor. It is a craft of phenomenal dimensions, it seems undamaged by its fall from the sky, and it appears to be at least three hundred years old. Rushed to the scene is a group of American scientists who investigate this astonishing discovery. What they find defies imaginations and mocks their attempts at logical explanation. Now a major motion picture directed by Barry Levinson and starring Sharon Stone, Dustin Hoffman, and Samuel L. Jackson.

Editorial Reviews

Robin Mckinley
No one can ask more of a thriller, except maybe that it be a little longer....Part of the fun of ''Sphere'' is that it keeps you going even when you're pretty sure of what will happen next....The last 10 pages are exactly what they should be. Take this one with you for your next long plane ride. -- New York Times
Library Journal
Crichton has rolled the present, past, and future into one highly technical and confusing science fiction adventure. The present features, among others, a pompous astrophysicist, a female zoologist, a black mathematician, and a 53-year-old psychologist, who are summoned by the Navy to examine a plane crash in the South Pacific. The past is manifested in the stranded object resting on the sea bottom where it has been for some 300 years. When the four scientists, who carry their emotional minority baggage of sex, color, and age along with them, descend to the deep in their submersible, they discover the wreck to be no less than a spaceship from the future that fell through a black hole, defying time and space. Strange things begin to happen as one by one the cast of characters diminishes. Disappointing. Literary Guild dual main selection. Marion Hanscom, SUNY at Binghamton Lib.
School Library Journal
YA As in Crichton's Andromeda Strain (Knopf, 1969), the focus of this science adventure tale is humankind's encounter with an alien life form. Within a space ship lying on the sea bottom is a mysterious sphere that promises each of the main characters some personal reward: military might, professional prestige, power, understanding. Trapped underwater with the sphere, the humans confront eerie and increasingly dangerous threats after communication with the alien object has been achieved. The story is exciting and loaded with scientific and psychological speculations that add interest at no cost to the action, including an intriguing sequence in which human and computer attempt to decode the alien communication. As the story races to an end, suspicions of evil-doing fall as many ways as in a detective novel. Young adults should find this book both accessible and satisfying. Mike Parson, Houston Public Library
New York Times Book Review
Praise for PREY:“Crichton’s books [are]…hugely entertaining.”
Chicago Tribune
“Crichton writes superbly…the excitement rises with each page.”
Los Angeles Times
Praise for STATE OF FEAR: “One of our most gifted popular novelists... Crichton’s fecund imagination and considerable storytelling talent have brought pleasure to millions. A master.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780553702323
Publisher:
Random House Audio Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/15/2001
Edition description:
Abridged, 2 cassettes, 3 hrs.
Product dimensions:
4.37(w) x 7.00(h) x 0.77(d)

Meet the Author

Michael Crichton has sold over 200 million books, which have been translated into thirty-eight languages; thirteen of his books have been made into films. His novels include Micro, Prey, State of Fear, Timeline, Jurassic Park, and The Andromeda Strain. Also known as a filmmaker and the creator of ER, he remains the only writer to have had the number one book, movie, and TV show simultaneously. He died in 2008 at the age of sixty-six.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Los Angeles, California
Date of Birth:
October 23, 1942
Date of Death:
November 4, 2008
Place of Birth:
Chicago, Illinois
Place of Death:
Los Angeles, California
Education:
B.A.. in Anthropology, Harvard University, 1964; M.D., Harvard Medical School, 1969
Website:
http://www.michaelcrichton.net/

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Sphere 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 194 reviews.
Mooslynn More than 1 year ago
It has been awhile since I have read this book and I haven't seen the movie so hopefully my memory will serve me well in this review. I remember the inability to put this book down. I was so scared and needed to find out what happened next. The supense was killing me. It combined two of my fears (deep water & the unknowing) which in my mind is a killer combination. The book was so good that I don't even have a desire to see the movie. Besides, the mind can be even more terrifying.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you have seen the movie, try to forget how hollywood murdered this story and look at Sphere with fresh eyes. As with other Crichton novels, this one is a real page turner. The movie jumbled the story and changed the plot completely. Here, we get to see what the sphere is actually about and what the scientists run into down there. Very psychological and a thrill to read! Read in one sitting.
The_One More than 1 year ago
The movie does this zero justice! Buy it! Borrow it! What ever you have to do, but just read it you will love it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I would give this book a 9 on a scale of 1 to 10
Thorne2112 More than 1 year ago
Michael Crichton shows that he's not only capable of writing an astounding thriller but he's also capable of writing an astounding psycho-thriller.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book. I wouldn't read it again, but I thought it was good.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Easy to follow fun.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pads in and falls asleep.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great SI-FI thriller, I love books like this. RIP Michael
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
very good
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the best book ive read and ive read a lot of books in my life time. I think that any one that hates this book is stupid. Im only on page # 215 and i cant put this book down at all. There are a few boring parts in the book yes but what book dosnt at least one boring part in it. My dad gave it to me to read yesterday and i had i really hard time doing anything. Not a least trying this book is crazy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Michael crichton is as great as lways I could barely put it down
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I can never forgive Michael Crichton. It happens again and again. His pace is unrelenting, his logic nearly flawless. His stories are invariably intense and suspenseful. I can never regain the sleep I’ve lost when reading "just one more chapter" each night. Michael Crichton, I rue the day you got me hooked. "Sphere" is a terrific sci-fi thriller. Instead of space though, the story takes place deep within the Pacific Ocean, where a team of scientists, in support of a US Navy exercise, explore and try to understand what appears to be a spaceship. Like most of Crichton’s novels, “Sphere’s” characters are created to give voice to varying personality types and perspectives. Crichton populates his undersea thriller with representatives from multiple scientific disciplines. Norman Goodman is a psychologist and explores the deepest parts of the human (and alien) mind. Beth Halperin is a biologist and brings her perspectives of earth and space-bound biological beings. Ted Fielding is the obnoxious astrophysicist, and Harold Barnes is the Navy commander who provides a militaristic, and conspiratorial, perspective. Harry Adams is a savant mathematician with prodigious reasoning skills. The character seems to be an early sketch of the well-known Dr. Ian Malcolm from Crichton’s “Jurassic Park”. Adams serves as the big brain and foil to the narrow-sighted exuberance of the martial Barnes in “Sphere”, whereas Malcolm served the same role as counterpoint to John Hammond’s financially-fueled dinosaur fervor on "Jurassic Park". Goodman works through the causalities of events and actions and gives Crichton a mechanism and mouthpiece for the exploration of human nature and motivation. Crichton utilizes Norman's field of expertise to provide the psychological context to the story. And instead of delivering the themes through a disembodied narrator, Norman’s internal monologue and dialogue with the other characters provides the mental framework driving the psychological horror and intensity. Crichton uses his plot, as usual, to delve into numerous scientific theories and perspectives. The alien presence provides the platform for the discussion of extraterrestrial contact, space travel and time travel. The underwater setting provides Crichton with the physical background to delve into ocean biology, and the capabilities and possibilities of living for extended periods under water. Within all of the scientific disciplines, Crichton enables his characters to explore the most modern and extreme theories of science. Norman uses the isolation and extreme existence of underwater habitats to provide readers with a view of a full-scale, real-time Rorschach test. Everyone and everything is viewed, absorbed and translated uniquely. Everything impacts the personalities in a different way, which drives the story's human elements in unison with the well-paced action surrounding and impacting the characters. The book has moments of horror, but is fueled by suspense. The conclusion - literally the last 2 pages - is a little weak, but the ride to get there is fantastic and fast.