Spies and Commandos: How America Lost the Secret War in North Vietnam / Edition 1

Spies and Commandos: How America Lost the Secret War in North Vietnam / Edition 1

by Kenneth J. Conboy, Dale Andrade
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0700610022

ISBN-13: 9780700610020

Pub. Date: 01/01/2000

Publisher: University Press of Kansas

During the Vietnam war, the U.S. sought to undermine Hanoi's subversion of the Saigon regime by sending Vietnamese operatives behind enemy lines. A secret to most Americans, this covert operation was far from secret in Hanoi: all of the commandos were killed or captured, and many were turned by the Communists to report false information.

Spies and Commandos

Overview

During the Vietnam war, the U.S. sought to undermine Hanoi's subversion of the Saigon regime by sending Vietnamese operatives behind enemy lines. A secret to most Americans, this covert operation was far from secret in Hanoi: all of the commandos were killed or captured, and many were turned by the Communists to report false information.

Spies and Commandos traces the rise and demise of this secret operation--started by the CIA in 1960 and expanded by the Pentagon beginning in1964--in the first book to examine the program from both sides of the war. Kenneth Conboy and Dale Andradé interviewed CIA and military personnel and traveled in Vietnam to locate former commandos who had been captured by Hanoi, enabling them to tell the complete story of these covert activities from high-level decision making to the actual experiences of the agents.

The book vividly describes scores of dangerous missions-including raids against North Vietnamese coastal installations and the air--dropping of dozens of agents into enemy territory--as well as psychological warfare designed to make Hanoi believe the "resistance movement" was larger than it actually was. It offers a more complete operational account of the program than has ever been made available--particularly its early years--and ties known events in the war to covert operations, such as details of the "34-A Operations" that led to the Tonkin Gulf incidents in 1964. It also explains in no uncertain terms why the whole plan was doomed to failure from the start.

One of the remarkable features of the operation, claim the authors, is that its failures were so glaring. They argue that the CIA, and later the Pentagon, were unaware for years that Hanoi had compromised the commandos, even though some agents missed radio deadlines or filed suspicious reports. Operational errors were not attributable to conspiracy or counterintelligence, they contend, but simply to poor planning and lack of imagination.

Although it flourished for ten years under cover of the wider war, covert activity in Vietnam is now recognized as a disaster. Conboy and Andradé's account of that episode is a sobering tale that lends a new perspective on the war as it reclaims the lost lives of these unsung spies and commandos.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780700610020
Publisher:
University Press of Kansas
Publication date:
01/01/2000
Series:
Modern War Studies Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
348
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.20(d)

Table of Contents

Prefacevii
1.Trojan Horses1
2.Singletons16
3.Airborne Agents31
4.Second Wind43
5.Vulcan51
6.Bang and Burn57
7.Nasty Boats66
8.Sacred Sword Patriot's League74
9.Switchback81
10.New Management90
11.Sea Commandos101
12.Tonkin Gulf116
13.Maritime Options124
14.Frustration Syndrome132
15.Premonitions146
16.Suspicious Minds156
17.Strata163
18.Red Dragon175
19.Short-Term Targets186
20.Denouement197
21.Guerrillas in Their Midst204
22.Urgency215
23.Closing the Gate224
24.Backdoor237
25.Exceptions to the Rule243
26.The Quiet One250
27.Last Missions260
28.Defeat267
Epilogue276
Notes281
A Note on Sources333
Index337

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