Spies and Spymasters of the Civil War

( 1 )

Overview

Although documentation shows that the American Civil War was conducted in large part by amateurs, the activities of spies gained some unprecedented sophistication thanks to new technology - photography, telegraphs, and even hot air balloons. Donald E. Markle details the rapid advances in methods of covert communication via newspaper and telegraph, and their effects on the war front. Enemy newspapers, for instance, became a coveted asset for the spy. Spies often acted as newspaper couriers for their governments, ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (19) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $16.00   
  • Used (16) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$16.00
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(321)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
REPRINT Edition, Fine-/Fine 1/4" x 3/8" whiteout on front endpaper, o.w. clean, bright & tight. No ink names, tears, chips, foxing, etc. ISBN 156619976X

Ships from: Troy, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$19.81
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(98)

Condition: New
156619976X Brand NEW Hardcover, BB31, * meticulously inspected, automatic 1st class upgrade for books under 14 ounces, packed securely, with care and extra padding, shipped ... promptly, we have quick responsive customer service, we also accept returns, and your purchase is satisfaction guaranteed, just email via contact seller link, if you have a question, or need a gift note with your personal message enclosed ~ we accept returns, and GUARANTEE YOUR SATISFACTION! Read more Show Less

Ships from: Waltham, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$49.99
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(6)

Condition: New
Brand New Book. No shelf wear and no remainder marks.

Ships from: pembroke pines, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Although documentation shows that the American Civil War was conducted in large part by amateurs, the activities of spies gained some unprecedented sophistication thanks to new technology - photography, telegraphs, and even hot air balloons. Donald E. Markle details the rapid advances in methods of covert communication via newspaper and telegraph, and their effects on the war front. Enemy newspapers, for instance, became a coveted asset for the spy. Spies often acted as newspaper couriers for their governments, or even provided a "clipping service" to swiftly convey information aiding military strategists and their supporters. In some rare but very effective cases, spies listened in on enemy communications and even acted as telegraphers for the enemy, distorting messages. Such activities prompted both the Union and Confederate forces to encode messages and develop cryptography skills. Markle brings to light the extensive participation of women in Civil War espionage. For the first time during an American war, women with a desire to take an active part in the war effort (in areas besides nursing) were able to spy on the enemy by relaying daily reports from the battlefields. This new phenomenon is due in part to the rapid movement of information; for the first time during a war, the civilian population received timely news of their armies, their losses, their victories, and their struggles. Information conveyed by both the Union and the Confederate spies was, inevitably, not always accurate. Markle details some of the havoc wreaked by the misinformed. Generals Van Dorn and Price, for example, experienced such misfortune when they were considering an attack on Corinth, Mississippi, in the fall of 1862. Based on the information of one of their spies, General Van Dorn grossly underestimated the number of Federal troops he faced. This miscalculation lead to a Confederate rout with a loss of over 5,000 of his 25,000 troops. Markle examines the spies' overall impact on
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Written by an intelligence professional, this treatment of Civil War espionage reflects his background; he frequently interjects his opinions and provides deep detail for operational topics. Although Markle's informal and enthusiastic style is quite readable, the book's topical organization and exhaustive treatment of some fairly arcane topics make it more useful for researchers than general readers. In fact, the book's final five chapters have a quasi-reference organization; featuring Markle's discussions of all known Civil War spies, they would alone make the book worth considering for academic libraries. Public libraries may want to look elsewhere, but this is the most general account in print.- Fritz Buckallew, Univ. of Central Oklahoma Lib., Edmond
Roland Green
The history of Civil War espionage is usually mentioned only in passing in general accounts of the war. Lying under a cloud of romanticism, its details have had to be ferreted out in specialized sources. For his complete account of the subject, Markle draws upon just about all the available material and summarizes it with judgment, balance, clarity, and occasional wit. Among the subtopics are technology (photography for mapmaking and Confederate use of a forerunner of microfilm), the value of women spies (less subject to suspicion, they could move with greater freedom than male spies), and the roles of blacks as spies. A good case could be made that this volume is the single most valuable contribution to general Civil War literature so far this year.
From Barnes & Noble
The development of photography, telegraphy, and even hot-air ballooning lent Civil War espionage an unprecedented sophistication and technological cutting edge. Examining the overall impact of spies on the outcome of the war, Donald E. Markle details the rapid advances in methods of covert communication via newspaper and telegraph and their effect on the war front. In some rare but effective instances, spies listened in on enemy communications and even acted as telegraphers for the enemy, distorting messages and prompting both sides to develop cryptography skills. Markle documents the participation of women as spies, the effect of misinformation on troop movement, and the overall impact of Civil War espionage on the modern world of intelligence. An eminently readable account, written with "...judgment, balance, clarity, and occasional wit."-- Booklist.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781566199766
  • Publisher: Sterling Publishing
  • Publication date: 7/31/1995
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 6.25 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.85 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Ch. 1 Civil War "Spy Chiefs" 1
Ch. 2 Intelligence Courier Systems 17
Ch. 3 Secret Organizations 25
Northern Sympathizers in the South 26
Southern Sympathizers in the North 29
Ch. 4 Technology Assists in Civil War Spying 33
Ch. 5 Intelligence Gathering by Cryptology 39
Union Cryptography 41
Confederate Cryptography 42
Ch. 6 Unique Spy Groups 49
Confederate Operations in Canada 50
Negro Spies 55
Newsboys 64
Spies from Europe 66
Spies in Europe 71
Telegraphic Spies 78
Ch. 7 Imprisonment, Exchange and Execution of Spies 85
Ch. 8 Individual Spies 95
Ch. 9 Confederate Male Spies 99
Thomas Conrad 99
Major W. P. Gorman 102
Harrison 104
Thomas R. Hines 106
"Renfrew" 110
Benjamin Franklin Stringfellow 111
Colonel Ashby 114
Walter Bowie 114
E. Pliny Bryan 115
John Burke 116
C. E. Coleman 116
Godfrey Hyamns 116
A. D. Lytle 116
Captain J. Maxwell 116
Channing Smith 117
William Smithson 117
Dr. Aaron Van Camp 117
Ch. 10 Union Male Spies 119
Spencer Kellogg Brown 119
George Curtis 122
James A. Garfield 124
"Colonel" Philps Henson 126
William A. Lloyd 130
Corporal Pike 134
Archibald Rowand, Jr. 135
Samuel Ruth 139
Felix Stidger 141
Timothy Webster 143
Captain H. H. Young 148
James Andrews 150
"Tinker" Dave Beatty 150
Harry Davies 150
"Charlie Davis" 151
Alexander Gardner 151
Joseph E. McCabe 152
Thomas McCammon 152
Charles Phillips 152
John Y. Phillips 152
B. W. Saunders 153
William T. Wood 153
Ch. 11 Confederate Female Spies 155
Belle Boyd 155
Rose O'Neal Greenhow 159
Sarah Slater 164
Mrs. Braxley 167
Belle Edmondson 167
Antonia Ford 167
Laura R. Hanna 168
Nancy Hart 168
Augusta Morris 169
Ginnie Moon 169
Lottie Moon 169
Ann Patterson 170
Kate Patterson 170
Ch. 12 Union Female Spies 171
Mrs. E. H. Baker 171
Pauline Cushman 173
Emma Edmonds 175
Elizabeth Van Lew 179
Mrs. Frances Abel 187
Hattie Lawton 187
Jeannette Laurimer Mabry 188
Mrs. Green 188
Mrs. Rice 188
Dr. Mary E. Walker 188
Rebecca West 189
Ch. 13 Listing of All Known Civil War Spies 191
Glossary of Civil War Spy Terms 217
Listing of Books Written by Civil War Spies 223
Bibliography 227
Index 235
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 2, 2014

    Super...! Great...! Wonderful...!

    Super...! Great...! Wonderful...!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)