Spike and Ike Take a Hike

Spike and Ike Take a Hike

by S.D. Schindler
     
 

When Spike and Ike take a hike, they meet lots of sassy creatures along the way, including an itty bitty kitty. But wait . . . this itty bitty pretty kitty turns out to be an itty bitty pretty spitty kitty! Other funny encounters include frogs in a soggy bog and a giraffe calf that makes them laugh.

S. D. Schindler’s simple,

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Overview

When Spike and Ike take a hike, they meet lots of sassy creatures along the way, including an itty bitty kitty. But wait . . . this itty bitty pretty kitty turns out to be an itty bitty pretty spitty kitty! Other funny encounters include frogs in a soggy bog and a giraffe calf that makes them laugh.

S. D. Schindler’s simple, descriptive wordplay builds one lively scene after another, and might just inspire children to make up cumulative stories of their own. His detailed illustrations add to the fun and feature a cast of unusual animals—including Spike the hedgehog and Ike the coatimundi.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Two unlikely friends—Spike, a somewhat apprehensive hedgehog and Ike, a sure-footed coatimundi (a raccoon relative with a long snout and black and orange stripes)—take a bipedal stroll through a springtime meadow on their way to find lunch. As they go, brief phrases appear at the bottom of each spread, expanding to explore alliteration and rhyme, while inspiring speech-bubble commentary from the pair. "A "soggy bog" reveals itself to be both a "soggy buggy bog" and a "soggy froggy buggy bog" ("They are eating the bugs! Yay!" cheers Ike, grateful for a reprieve from the swarms of mosquitoes on the previous spread). In another scene, the friends meet an "itty-bitty kitty" ("Soft fur. She is pretty," says Spike), but the feline has a mean streak—she's a "itty-bitty pretty spitty kitty." Schindler's (We're Going on a Ghost Hunt) pastel-hued, finely detailed landscape allows the two amblers and the animals they meet to stay the central focus of an understated story that will help beginning readers both expand their vocabularies and draw connections between words. Ages 3–5. (Apr.)
Booklist
“The colorful, textured watercolor, salt, and colored-pencil illustrations softly present a variety of different landscapes and a cast of unusual and adorable animals.”
From the Publisher
“Wacky wordplay. . . . The tongue-twisting nature of the read-aloud text adds to the humor. Its rhyme and alliteration may help emerging readers, and the animals are shown clearly in the artist's deft illustrations. . . . Here's hoping the happy pair have more adventures to come.” - Kirkus Reviews

“A delight on many levels. The illustrations are filled with humorous details. . . . The cumulative text bursting with rhyme and alliteration is just perfect for beginning readers learning the sounds of language. After enjoying this story, they may even be stimulated to create their own cumulative text for favorite pictures. Don't miss this neat treat.” - School Library Journal

“The colorful, textured watercolor, salt, and colored-pencil illustrations softly present a variety of different landscapes and a cast of unusual and adorable animals.” - Booklist

Children's Literature - Claudia Mills
Two animal friends go for a walk to visit a cousin for lunch. Along the way they stop to comment on a "big busy buzzy bumblebee," a "blue-footed booby baby bird," a "soggy froggy buggy bog," an "itty-bitty pretty spitty kitty," and a giraffe with her calf that makes them laugh. Each double-page spread shows the two characters engaged in conversation depicted in dialogue bubbles ("Whoa! Big Bee!;" "It is a bumblebee!"), while a bar at the bottom of the spread accumulates the descriptive words for each creature encountered along the way ("big busy buzzy bumblebee"). While the descriptive phrases are fun to say, the story itself offers no adventures shared by the two companions. Nothing much happens throughout the entire thirty-two pages except for some buzzing, squawking, spitting, and laughing. Unlike Nancy Shaw's sheep series (Sheep in a Jeep, Sheep in a Shop, Sheep on a Ship), which delivers its clever word play in the service of an independently interesting narrative, Ike and Spike's hike to their "lunch bunch munch" offers little story to engage young readers, only a mouthful of tongue-twisters. Reviewer: Claudia Mills, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—While out on a hike, Spike, a hedgehog, and Ike, a coatimundi, get hungry and decide to go to Ike's cousin's for lunch. They encounter several creatures as they walk along the shore, across a meadow, and through a bog. Large illustrations, done in watercolor, salt, and colored pencil, cover most of each spread and depict the different landscapes and animals Spike and Ike see, while speech balloons convey their comments. Page turns reveal even more chatter from the pair. Rhyming cumulative text summarizing their observations runs along the bottom of each page. For example, on one spread, Ike says that the bog they must cross is wet. The text underneath reads, "Soggy/bog." A page turn shows the unhappy pals plagued by bugs, and the text below states, "Soggy/buggy bog." Many frogs eating the bugs appear in the last spread in this section, and the cumulative text on the bottom summarizes the scene: "Soggy froggy/buggy bog." This book is a delight on many levels. The illustrations are filled with humorous details. Ike and Spike cry and frown in vexation as they are swarmed by bugs, and the reprise of all the happy animals in a "lunch bunch munch" is charming. The cumulative text bursting with rhyme and alliteration is just perfect for beginning readers learning the sounds of language. After enjoying this story, they may even be stimulated to create their own cumulative text for favorite pictures. Don't miss this neat treat.—Marianne Saccardi, formerly at Norwalk Community College, CT
Kirkus Reviews
Wacky wordplay accompanies a hedgehog and a coatimundi as they walk to lunch at Cousin Rosa's. A cheerful pair of cartoonlike critters, Spike and Ike (named and identified only in the cataloging summary), improbably travel through a flowery meadow, along an island beach, across a buggy bog and into a savannah in their quest for food. On their way, they meet a busy bumblebee, a pair of birds, frogs, a cat and a giraffe with a calf--a fine lunch bunch. As they pass through the generic landscapes, they converse simply in speech bubbles. Wordplay describing their trip runs on a ribbon along the bottom. In a career that has spanned over 30 years, Schindler has illustrated well over 100 picture and chapter books but almost never written the text himself. Readers will be happy he has taken this path. The tongue-twisting nature of the read-aloud text adds to the humor. Its rhyme and alliteration may help emerging readers, and the animals are shown clearly in the artist's deft illustrations. Even if readers or listeners have never before encountered a "blue-footed booby baby bird," they won't forget this one. Here's hoping the happy pair have more adventures to come. (Picture book. 3-6)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399244957
Publisher:
Nancy Paulsen Books
Publication date:
04/18/2013
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.90(w) x 10.86(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

S. D. Schindler has illustrated a wide range of picture books, including Hornbooks and Inkwells and Gold Fever (both by Verla Kay), The Unforgettable Season (by Phil Bildner), The Snow Globe Family (by Jane O'Connor) and Louder, Lili (by Gennifer Choldenko). He lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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