The Spinning World: A Global History of Cotton Textiles, 1200-1850

Overview


Cotton textiles were the first good to achieve a truly global reach. For many centuries muslins and calicoes from the Indian subcontinent were demanded in the trading worlds of the Indian Ocean and the eastern Mediterranean. After 1500, new circuits of exchange were developed. Of these, the early-modern European craze for Indian calicoes and the huge nineteenth-century export trade in Lancashire goods, and subsequent deindustrialization of the Indian subcontinent, are merely the best known. These episodes, ...
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Overview


Cotton textiles were the first good to achieve a truly global reach. For many centuries muslins and calicoes from the Indian subcontinent were demanded in the trading worlds of the Indian Ocean and the eastern Mediterranean. After 1500, new circuits of exchange were developed. Of these, the early-modern European craze for Indian calicoes and the huge nineteenth-century export trade in Lancashire goods, and subsequent deindustrialization of the Indian subcontinent, are merely the best known. These episodes, although of great importance, far from exhaust the story of cotton. They are well known because of the enormous research energy that has been devoted to them, but other important elements of cotton's long history are deserving of similar attention.
The purpose of this collection of essays is to examine the history of cotton textiles at a global level over the period 1200-1850. This volume sheds light on new answers to two questions: what is it about cotton that made it the paradigmatic first global commodity? And second, why did cotton industries in different parts of the world follow different paths of development?

Essays included in the volume are authored by 19 scholars from eight different nations, all of whom are specialists in the study of textiles. They are drawn from a range of sub-disciplines within history and bring together their areas and periods of specialization to provide a global history. Therefore, the volume covers a wide variety of approaches to the study of history, which is essential for constructing a global picture. Some of the contributors are internationally well known for their publications on the history of cotton, as well as other textiles in different world areas. The volume also draws upon the research of a number of younger scholars whose work will form the core of the future development of textile history as a global discipline.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199696161
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 11/14/2011
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 489
  • Sales rank: 859,052
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Giorgio Riello is Assistant Professor in Global History and Culture at the University of Warwick. He has written on early modern textiles, dress and fashion in Europe and Asia. From 2004 to 2007 he was Research Officer for the Global Economic History Network at the London School of Economics. He is the author of A Foot in the Past: Consumers, Producers and Footwear in the Long Eighteenth Century (Oxford, 2006). Giorgio is currently writing a monograph entitled Worldwide Wefts: Cotton Textiles in Global History.

Prasannan Parthasarathi is Associate Professor of History at Boston College. He is the author of The Transition to a Colonial Economy: Weavers, Merchants and Kings in South India, 1720-1800 (Cambridge, 2001) as well as several articles in comparative and global economic history. His Why Europe Grew Rich and Asia Did Not will be published shortly.

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Cotton Textiles in Global History, Giorgio Riello and Prasannan Parthasarathi
PART I. World Areas of Cotton Textile Manufacturing
1. Cotton Textiles in the Indian Subcontinent, 1200-1800, Prasannan Parthasarathi
2. The Resistant Fibre: Cotton Textiles in Imperial China, Harriet T. Zurndorfer
3. The First European Cotton Industry: Italy and Germany, 1100-1800, Maureen Fennell Mazzaoui
4. Ottoman Cotton Textiles: The Story of a Success that did not Last, 1500-1800, Suraiya Faroqhi
5. 'Guinea Cloth': Cotton Textiles in West Africa before and during the Atlantic Slave Trade, Colleen E. Kriger
6. The Production of Cotton Textiles in Early Modern Southeast Asia, William Gervase Clarence-Smith
PART II. Global Trade and Consumption of Cotton Textiles
7. Indian Textiles in the Indian Ocean in the Early Modern Period, Om Prakash
8. Awash in a Sea of Cloth: South Asian Merchants, Cloth and Consumption in the Indian Ocean, 1300-1800, Pedro Machado
9. Japan Indianised: The Material Culture of Imported Textiles in Japan, 1550-1850, Kayoko Fujita
10. Revising the Historical Narrative: India, Europe and the Cotton Trade, Beverly Lemire
11. Cottons Consumption in the Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century North Atlantic, Robert S. DuPlessis
12. Fashion, Race and Cotton Textiles in Colonial Spanish America, Marta Valentin Vicente
13. The Globalization of Cotton Textiles: Indian Cottons, Europe and the Atlantic World, 1600-1850, Giorgio Riello
PART III. Cotton Revolutions and their Consequences in Europe and Asia
14. The Birth of a New European Industry: L'Indiennage in Seventeenth-Century Marseilles, Olivier Raveux
15. What were Cottons for in the Industrial Revolution?, John Styles
16. The Limits of Wool and the Potential of Cotton in the Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries, Pat Hudson
17. The Geopolitics of a Global Industry: Eurasian Divergence and the Mechanisation of Cotton Textile Production in England, Patrick O'Brien
18. Cotton and the Peasant Economy: A Foreign Fibre in Early Modern Japan, Masayuki Tanimoto
19. Involution and Chinese Cotton Textile Production: Songjiang in the Late-Eighteenth and Early-Nineteenth Centuries, Bozhong Li
20. Decline in Three Keys: Indian Cotton Manufacturing from the Late Eighteenth Century, Prasannan Parthasarathi and Ian Wendt

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