Spinster Goose: Twisted Rhymes for Naughty Children

Overview

Some children are simply too naughty for Mother Goose to handle. Luckily her sister Spinster Goose knows just how to deal with these uncouth urchins. Her school is home to some world-class troublemakers: they bite and pinch, they talk back and fight—they eat chalk! But brats beware—this isn’t just any school, and Spinster isn't your average goose. Her curious methods will rid these students of their horrendous behaviors…right?

Fans of Mother Goose will delight in these ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (37) from $1.99   
  • New (19) from $3.22   
  • Used (18) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Some children are simply too naughty for Mother Goose to handle. Luckily her sister Spinster Goose knows just how to deal with these uncouth urchins. Her school is home to some world-class troublemakers: they bite and pinch, they talk back and fight—they eat chalk! But brats beware—this isn’t just any school, and Spinster isn't your average goose. Her curious methods will rid these students of their horrendous behaviors…right?

Fans of Mother Goose will delight in these devilishly twisted alternatives to classic rhymes.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This collection of Mother Goose parodies by Wheeler (Ugly Pie) and Blackall (Pecan Pie Baby) is as elegant as it is, like Mary, "quite contrary." The no-nonsense Spinster Goose oversees a reform school: "Not painted up pretty,/ it's mottled and gray./ The grounds are a nightmare./ (She likes it that way)." Blackall's pallid vignettes balance chilly poise and mordant humor. In one spread, a line of truculent children/animal hybrids slouch beneath Spinster Goose's gaze, one with a cigarette smoking behind her back. In "The Dirty Kid," medical-style spots provide closeups of the lice in bath-averse Polly Flinders's hair and the toejam between her toes. Wheeler adds some intellectual depth to the original nursery rhymes while grossifying them. Little Miss Muffet chews chalk, while a familiar Mary is recast as an unrepentant fibber ("Mary had a little lamb./ She said it was a horse./ But anyone with eyes could see/ it was a lamb, of course"). Though some may shrink from its clever ghastliness, kids with twisted senses of humor will feel right at home. Ages 5–up. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Carrie Hane Hung
What does Mother Goose do with the naughty children that she can no longer handle? She sends them out to her sister who runs a school for children with unrefined manners and terrible behaviors. In her introduction, Mother Goose informs the readers that the disobedient children become the changes of Spinster Goose. Then, the tour of the school begins. Read the dark, twisted nursery rhymes about the disobedient youngsters. Find out about the eating habits of Little Miss Muffet who haunting smile is chalk-lit or how Spinster Goose handles Georgie Porgie, the bully who picked on the younger kids. Read the verses on what happens to the little girl who always twirled her curl or to Jack and Jill who skipped class. Find out what Spinster Goose has in store for them. The illustrations have a ghoulish appearance; the muted gray clothing of the characters brings about a bleak look for the misbehaving urchins. The readers who like a bit of dark humor will probably enjoy the classic nursery rhymes served with a twist. Reviewer: Carrie Hane Hung
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3—As the title suggests, these rhymes lean toward the dark side and will appeal most to those who like their giggles with a bit of a spin. The endpaper image sets the scene—a bleak-looking house with barred windows and playground in disrepair sits on a lonely, empty landscape. This is where Mother Goose sends incorrigible children to live with her sister, Spinster Goose, and where they eventually get their comeuppance. Wheeler's verses showcase well-known nursery rhyme characters, but their deeds here take a far different path. Margery Daw's constant gum chewing, Bobby Shaftoe's thievery, Georgie Porgie's bullying, and Peter Peter's cheating are these youngsters' misdemeanors and are dealt with—at least at Spinster Goose's school—in revolutionary ways. "Baa Baa Black Sheep/loves to curse and swear./Here a BLEAT. There a BLEAT./BLEAT, BLEAT everywhere!" What does the Spinster do? "She hires shearers from the north,/hygienists from the south./They promptly shear his BLEATING wool,/then wash his BLEATING mouth!" Blackall backs up the rhymes with wry, devilish images that surround, infiltrate, and help spark this offbeat collection. Pairing these parodies with a traditional Mother Goose book (such as those by Tomie dePaola or Rosemary Wells) will help expand listeners' appreciation of Wheeler's humor.—Barbara Elleman, Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Amherst, MA
Kirkus Reviews - Kikus Reviews

Delectably satiric nursery rhymes play with naughtiness and punishment. Mother Goose sends disobedient children (some human, some half-animal) to her sister Spinster Goose's reform school, where "The pinchers get pinched, / and the pokers get poked. / The biters get bit, / and the smokers get smoked." Crimes range from eating chalk to stealing sweets and cheating. Some consequences arise naturally (gum-chewer's gum explodes on her face), while others come at Spinster's strict hand: Baa Baa Black Sheep swears, so Spinster "hires shearers from the north, / hygenists [sic] from the south. / They promptly shear his BLEATING wool, / then wash his BLEATING mouth!" Real violence remains mostly at rumor level as threats—an electric chair and stretching rack are shown but not used. Lard-boiled beans prove that "Life is Gruel"; deliberately filthy Polly Flinders refuses to shower because "this punk is into Grunge." Badness was never more enjoyable than Wheeler's wicked rewrites: "Friday's child stole seventeen lunches. / Saturday's child threw seventeen punches. / But the child who got a Sunday detention / did something too naughty for me to mention." Blackall's watercolor-and-ink illustrations are fascinatingly delicate in line and color as they convey all the funny, delicious ghastliness of necks bending in woe, cheeks paling in nausea and this whole mob of unbiddable, hybrid Struwwelpeter/Gorey kids. (Picture book/poetry. 8 & up)

Kirkus Reviews

Delectably satiric nursery rhymes play with naughtiness and punishment. Mother Goose sends disobedient children (some human, some half-animal) to her sister Spinster Goose's reform school, where "The pinchers get pinched, / and the pokers get poked. / The biters get bit, / and the smokers get smoked." Crimes range from eating chalk to stealing sweets and cheating. Some consequences arise naturally (gum-chewer's gum explodes on her face), while others come at Spinster's strict hand: Baa Baa Black Sheep swears, so Spinster "hires shearers from the north, / hygenists [sic] from the south. / They promptly shear his BLEATING wool, / then wash his BLEATING mouth!" Real violence remains mostly at rumor level as threats—an electric chair and stretching rack are shown but not used. Lard-boiled beans prove that "Life is Gruel"; deliberately filthy Polly Flinders refuses to shower because "this punk is into Grunge." Badness was never more enjoyable than Wheeler's wicked rewrites: "Friday's child stole seventeen lunches. / Saturday's child threw seventeen punches. / But the child who got a Sunday detention / did something too naughty for me to mention." Blackall's watercolor-and-ink illustrations are fascinatingly delicate in line and color as they convey all the funny, delicious ghastliness of necks bending in woe, cheeks paling in nausea and this whole mob of unbiddable, hybrid Struwwelpeter/Gorey kids. (Picture book/poetry. 8 & up)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416925415
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 3/8/2011
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 988,122
  • Age range: 5 - 10 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.20 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Lisa Wheeler has written eighteen books for children, including The Pet Project, illustrated by Zachariah OHora, and the hilarious Spinster Goose, illustrated by Sophie Blackall. She lives with her family in Addison, Michigan. Visit her online at LisaWheelerBooks.com.

Sophie Blackall is an Australian illustrator whose previous books include Ruby's Wish and Meet Wild Boars. She also illustrates the Ivy & Bean series. Sophie lives in Brooklyn, New York and can be visited at sophieblackall.com.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)