Spirits of the Earth: A Guide to Native American Symbols, Stories and Ceremonies

( 10 )

Overview

"There are ancient secrets and lessons hidden in nature. If you seek for guidance, you will discover truth." —Bobby Lake-Thom

Much of the ancient knowledge that has been passed down from Native American medicine men, or shamans is in danger of being lost. Bobby Lake-Thom, a Native American healer known as Medicine Grizzly Bear, has sought to preserve this powerful heritage by sharing his wisdom and experience learning from the world around us. The result is Spirits of the Earth, an extraordinary compilation of ...

See more details below
Paperback
$16.41
BN.com price
(Save 17%)$20.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (27) from $1.99   
  • New (9) from $11.21   
  • Used (18) from $1.99   
Spirits of the Earth: A Guide to Native American Nature Symbols, Stories, and Ceremonies

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$15.99
BN.com price

Overview

"There are ancient secrets and lessons hidden in nature. If you seek for guidance, you will discover truth." —Bobby Lake-Thom

Much of the ancient knowledge that has been passed down from Native American medicine men, or shamans is in danger of being lost. Bobby Lake-Thom, a Native American healer known as Medicine Grizzly Bear, has sought to preserve this powerful heritage by sharing his wisdom and experience learning from the world around us. The result is Spirits of the Earth, an extraordinary compilation of legends and rituals about nature's ever-present signs. From the birds that soar above us to the insincts beneath our feet, Bobby Lake-Thom shows how the creatures of the earth can aid us in healing and self-knowledge.

What does it mean if a hawk appears in a dream? What are the symbolic interpretations of a deer, a skunk, a raccoon? Lake-Thom, who has studied with the elders of many tribes, explains the significance of animal figures as manifestations of good or evil, and shows how we can develop our own powers of awareness and intuition. The first book of its kind, this practical and enlightening resource includes dozens of fashinating animal myths and legends, as well as exercises and activities that draw upon animal powers for guidance, healing, wisdom, and the expansion of spiritual influences in our lifes. You'll discover here:

  • How animals, birds, and insects act as signs and omens
  • The significance of vision quests
  • How to make and use a medicine wheel
  • The role of spirit symbols—and how they affect the unconscious
  • Excercises for creative dreaming
  • The power of the earth-healing ceremony
  • How to increase your spiritual strength and create sacred spaces
  • And more
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Native Americans believe that animal spirits can ultimately influence everyday lives. Lake-Thom, a healer and a descendant of three Native American tribes, combines his own experience, work with tribal elders, and readings from folk tales to explain the significance of good- and bad-luck symbols to these tribes. For instance, the hummingbird is considered to be a good-luck messenger that can carry a person's prayers to the Creator; in contrast, the owl is considered a sign of bad luck and a messenger of death. In a clear and straightforward writing style, the author defines symbols such as the turtle, bear, and coyote for Karuk, Seneca, and Cherokee tribes. He also includes several chapters on how one can get in touch with animal spirits through active participation in ceremonies and establishing sacred places. There is a helpful index and accompanying sketches. Recommended for public libraries.Vicki Leslie Toy Smith, Univ. of Nevada, Reno
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780452276505
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 8/28/1997
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 198,746
  • Product dimensions: 7.37 (w) x 9.27 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Bobby Lake-Thom, known as Medicine Grizzly Bear, is a traditional Native healer and spiritual teacher of Karuk and Seneca descent (affiliated with the Quartz Valley Indian Reservation in California). He has been schooled in both Western and Native american traditions and has taught and lectured extensively aross the United States for more than three decades. He is the author of two previous books on Native American culture and spirituality, Native Healer and Chilula: People from the Ancient Redwoods, and his articles have appeared in The Indian Historian, The Journal for Ethnic Studies, Quest magazine, Shaman's Drum, and other publications. He lives near Mt. Shasta in Yreka, California.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 11 of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2004

    changed my life

    this book changed the way i live and think it should be read by all.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2001

    A wonderfull book

    I borrowed this book from the library and I liked it so much I am going to buy my own copy. The book talks about the relations of nature and man. It explains the the native stories very well. Native american stories are a way to keep the history alive. For those people who believed native americans were savages because of their worshiping methods will understand what they were worshiping. They believed in a higher power, what some of us have labled god. The stories are completedly interesting. My warning is that you won't be able to put it down. The stories are about animals and so interesting that i am reading them to my children who are ages of 3 and 6. If you dont think much about nature this book will help you relate to it's importance. If you have children think of how the beggining was, the only shelter we depended on was nature. This book will get you started on thinking. I am hoping this book will have a sequal.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 8, 2011

    fun and absolute magic!

    This book is a wonderful primer of native american mythology. Easy to read and very informative as well as great fun, yet still a deep and profound wisdom emerges from its pages.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2013

    Dewpaw

    WRITE MORE!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2013

    Jaysoar

    Oh, wow! -Jaysoar

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2013

    After the War

    WARRIORS — CRY TO THE STARS
    BOOK ONE - AFTER THE WAR


    Chapter Four:
    Hollyspark padded off towards the warriors' den, still slightly surprised by Spiderstar's choice of deputy. Stretching, the small black shecat watched as Lilypatch and Dovestorm padded off to congragulate Foxleap.
    "Hey," Stormheart mewed, padding up and flicking a tail-tip over his sister's ear. Hollyspark smiled at the dark gray tabby, but frowned as she noticed a hint of grief and sadness in his deep blue eyes.
    "You okay?" the small warrior asked quietly, tilting her head to one side.
    Stormheart shook his head. "I'm fine," the gray tabby meowed quickly. Hollyspark noticed as her brother cast a glance into the crowd, his blue eyes resting on the dappled ginger pelt of Cherryfrost. The black shecat noticed that Cherryfrost looked sad and confused as she said something to her brown and cream brother, Moletooth.
    When she looked up, Stormheart had padded off to join Winterbreeze and Snowfern. The three toms talked in hushed voices, and Hollyspark wondered what they were discussing. With a shrug, the black shecat trotted off.
    Not looking where she was going, Hollyspark nearly ran straight into Dovestorm. The light gray tom stumbled over his paws, quickly regaining his balance and shaking his short stone-gray pelt.
    "Sorry!" Hollyspark apologized quickly, feeling her black fur prickle with embarrassment.
    "It's okay," Dovestorm mumbled, his bright blue gaze shifting to his paws. As the large gray tom trailed past, Hollyspark let her tail-tip trail over his spine, trying to cheer him up. The black shecat glanced around, seeing the sky darken. It was time for the Clan to be heading for their nests.
    Hollyspark turned and padded after Ambershine, following her friend towards the warriors' den. The dark ginger shecat's fur shone in the fading sunlight as the lithe warrior slipped into the crowded den. Hollyspark picked her way in after Ambershine, stepping carefully over Winterbreeze's protruding gray-white tail.
    The black shecat made her way over to her nest, and slowly curled up. Beside her nest, Dovestorm's gray ears twitched as if he knew she was there, and Stormheart squeezed into a tighter gray ball.
    Hollyspark curled up, her dark green eyes gazing around the den. Her gaze rested on Grasspelt, who lay beside her, his light brown fur turned silver in the early moonlight. His grass green eyes opened, and the black shecat felt her pelt shiver from her ears to her tail-tip as she stared into Grasspelt's bright green eyes...
    Hollyspark could almost imagine herself reaching out her muzzle to touch Grasspelt's, and to entwine her black tail with his. Suddenly startled out of her daydream, the black shecat blinked, and rested her head on her paws. With a sigh, she closed her eyes and tried to push Grasspelt out of her mind.
    Sleep came swiftly, and Hollyspark found herself in the midst of a raging forest fire. Flames swept past her, and the black shecat let out a yowl of terror as the fire tore after her. Heart pounding and paws flying, Hollyspark ran, searching for a way to escape to burning woodland.
    Dodging a burning branch, Hollyspark skidded around and dove for the bushes. Flames licked at her black pelt, and the small shecat looked up to see the fire scorching out the sky.
    And she knew that however far she ran, she and her Clan could never escape this oncoming fire of death.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 11 of 10 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)