Spiritual Journaling: Writing Your Way to Independence

Spiritual Journaling: Writing Your Way to Independence

by Julie Tallard Johnson
     
 

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A guide for teens and young adults on the power of creative journaling and its role in enhancing self-discovery and self-awareness

• Provides encouragement for creative writing, self-expression, and self-dialogue

• Includes journaling exercises to inspire creativity and cultivate self-esteem

• By the author of Teen Psychic

Overview

A guide for teens and young adults on the power of creative journaling and its role in enhancing self-discovery and self-awareness

• Provides encouragement for creative writing, self-expression, and self-dialogue

• Includes journaling exercises to inspire creativity and cultivate self-esteem

• By the author of Teen Psychic and The Thundering Years, winner of the 2002 Independent Publisher Book Award for multicultural juvenile nonfiction

Most teens and young adults search for ways to express their individuality and to discover who they are, without being judged. In Spiritual Journaling Julie Tallard Johnson shows that journaling is an informative and supportive outlet for the joys, frustrations, and questions that arise for those making the transition toward their own independent ideas and lives--and a powerful tool for awakening creative potential.

Johnson encourages young people to discover their own unique voices by offering guidance on writing and other forms of self-expression and self-dialogue and on learning how to listen to inner wisdom. As readers move through the book and write in their own personal journals, they gain insight about themselves--knowledge reflected in their own words and the writing of other young people included in the book. The journaling tools provided include meditations, consulting oracles, writing poetry, visualizations, writing rituals, and problem solving around spiritual questions.

Julie Tallard Johnson is a licensed psychotherapist and creative writing teacher. She is the author of seven books, including Teen Psychic, The Thundering Years, and I Ching for Teens. She lives in Spring Green, Wisconsin.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
This title's multicultural approach and multitude of suggested writing exercises and prompts designed to help its readers find their truest selves on the page will appeal to sensitive, thoughtful teens searching for something bigger than themselves. Each chapter is married to-but not dominated by-a theme, such as love, poetry, travel, or hard times, and includes a variety of writing exercises-some involved, some brief-to keep the reader interested and on track. Every page includes a sidebar featuring an inspirational or thought-provoking quote from poets, novelists, and essayists both classical and modern, some well known and others very obscure. The most teen-friendly feature of this book and the one that sets it apart from similar titles such as Julia Cameron's The Artist's Way (Tarcher, 2002) is the author's commitment to using excerpts from teen and young adult journals to illustrate the themes in each chapter. Johnson's style and philosophy is decidedly New Age-y and clearly influenced by Native American spirituality, so the text as a whole might not be welcome in sectarian religious schools, but the individual writing exercises are all sound and could easily find a home in creative and expository writing classes in any school. It is an offbeat but worthy choice. VOYA CODES: 4Q 3P M J S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Will appeal with pushing; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2006, Bindu Books, 272p.; Further Reading., Trade pb. Ages 11 to 18.
—Sophie Brookover
Children's Literature - Carlee Hallman
Teens are encouraged to keep a journal as a means of gaining self-understanding, and also, for later use as a book. The author offers guidance through the use of many spiritual traditions such as Buddhist, Native American, I Ching, and Christian among others. Meditation, dreams, nature, tarot cards, and other aids are suggested for getting in touch with oneself. Part of one chapter defines forgiveness as: ".giving up any negative emotions that you are holding on to (and that are therefore harming you). Freeing yourself of any hold or power that the offender may have over you in the form of your continued anger, resentment, or desire for revenge." The definition continues with talking to a trusted person and setting boundaries, followed by a meditation for forgiving others and forgiving yourself. Each page has a pithy quotation in a gray border. The text is broken up with writing from teens, special suggestions for practicing the material presented, and short poems. The book ends with ideas about death and the afterlife. The author shares her own struggle to find meaning during her teenage years. This book offers many avenues of self-discovery which may prove helpful to teens seeking to find their own way.
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up-Having been a journal-writer most of her life, Johnson offers teens this guide to self-discovery. Her advice is to stop seeking the illusion of what is real and instead find the reality within. The book covers 15 topics, including nature, spirit, school, death, and love. Each chapter has inspirational quotes, poems, stories, and discussions and asks questions to encourage personal focus through journaling. The order of the chapters is irrelevant; readers are encouraged to select those that best suit their personal needs. Though this title initially appears religious in nature, it is more specifically about the spirit. It might also interest teachers, parents, counselors, and youth ministers who wish to help young adults find their internal flames.-Jodi Kearns, University of Akron, OH Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
“. . . written with the young adult in mind . . . . Its inventive, different journaling techniques use meditations, oracle consultation, visualization rituals and more to aid the writing process, providing a satisfying mix of new age technique and writing advice.”

“What a wonderful book to help a teen or young adult gain insight into their identity and life's purpose! Lots of writing exercises, but this book is constructed to make these a joy instead of a homework-type chore. . . . Spiritual Journaling: Writing Your Way to Independence is a great book for a young person interested in self-exploration or going through a transition.”

"This is a powerful tool for awakening the imaginative voice in any young adult and helping them realize their very own creative potential, truly a priceless gift."

"Throughout the book are stories, discussions, and exercises, all aimed at showing us how, through the tool of journaling, we can gain a clear view of our past so that we see where we came from, how we got where we are today, and how we can stay on our individual paths for the future. This book is meant to tear away the illusion of what we are hungry for, and allow us to discover what the real thing is, and how we can get it for ourselves."

April 2006 - Angelfire.com
"Throughout the book are stories, discussions, and exercises, all aimed at showing us how, through the tool of journaling, we can gain a clear view of our past so that we see where we came from, how we got where we are today, and how we can stay on our individual paths for the future. This book is meant to tear away the illusion of what we are hungry for, and allow us to discover what the real thing is, and how we can get it for ourselves."
Diane Donovan
“. . . written with the young adult in mind . . . . Its inventive, different journaling techniques use meditations, oracle consultation, visualization rituals and more to aid the writing process, providing a satisfying mix of new age technique and writing advice.”
Vision Magazine
"This is a powerful tool for awakening the imaginative voice in any young adult and helping them realize their very own creative potential, truly a priceless gift."
Galina Pembroke
“What a wonderful book to help a teen or young adult gain insight into their identity and life's purpose! Lots of writing exercises, but this book is constructed to make these a joy instead of a homework-type chore. . . . Spiritual Journaling: Writing Your Way to Independence is a great book for a young person interested in self-exploration or going through a transition.”
April 2006 Angelfire.com
"Throughout the book are stories, discussions, and exercises, all aimed at showing us how, through the tool of journaling, we can gain a clear view of our past so that we see where we came from, how we got where we are today, and how we can stay on our individual paths for the future. This book is meant to tear away the illusion of what we are hungry for, and allow us to discover what the real thing is, and how we can get it for ourselves."
May 2006 Vision Magazine
"This is a powerful tool for awakening the imaginative voice in any young adult and helping them realize their very own creative potential, truly a priceless gift."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781594776755
Publisher:
Inner Traditions/Bear & Company
Publication date:
02/23/2006
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
272
File size:
4 MB

Read an Excerpt


The Big Design


We are each spinning our individual threads, lending texture, color, pattern, to the “big design” that is serving us all.
-Karen Casey


Journals are a tapestry of our life. Each journal entry becomes a thread, connecting us to all the other journal entries, and to every event in our life. When we read through them, we discover cohesive and meaningful patterns.


When you find a thread in your journal and pull on it, an entire story unfolds before you, and even when it may be a sad story you will feel somehow stronger. This strength comes from the connection we experience to ourselves through our journals. Everything we write somehow matters and is somehow linked to everything else.


Your journal entries can be a thread to your past and future, to your feelings and insights. When we write about our days, our experiences, we keep these threads visible throughout our lives.



"There’s a thread you follow. It goes among things that change. But it doesn’t change. People wonder about what you are pursuing. You have to explain about the thread. But it is hard for others to see. While you hold it you can’t get lost. Tragedies happen; people get hurt or die; and you suffer and get old. Nothing you do can stop time’s unfolding. You don’t ever let go of the thread."
-William Stafford


Finding your thread


Give yourself at least an hour to sit privately, searching for a thread. If you already have a journal, look through it to find a thread. If you aren’t already journaling, just pull a thread from some event in your life.


- Search for recurring dreams and look for the common thread in them. What difficulty keeps arising? Have you solved it yet? 
- How does this thread connect to your past, present and possible future? 
- What does the thread tell you about yourself today? 
- Write about a thread that makes you feel good.


Below is an entry from my journal I wrote when I was nineteen and in college, recalling a childhood memory. Following that is my recent reflection on both the original experience and my earlier writing about it.


Just An Average Girl
“Flowers are for our souls to enjoy.” -Sioux proverb


8 am, August 1976
I walked this particular route home from grade school almost every day. It became a familiar and safe shortcut through the corner of a deep woods. My feet would usually be covered with damp grass and dirt by the time I reached home. Once out of the woods, I would cross a yard that in the late spring would be covered with dandelions. As they are to most children, dandelions were beautiful to me--free flowers for the picking. Mixed in with the dandelions were Indian paintbrushes. This day I grabbed a handful of both to offer my mother on my arrival home from third grade.


It astonishes me how hopeful I felt as I picked the flowers and carried them home. I fantasized about my mother receiving these gifts.


That day I also carried home my report card. In one hand I had the flowers, quickly folding over on themselves and in the other, my third grade report card. Covered with Cs. I felt unsure of myself. C. C stands for “Can’t.” Can’t do better. Can’t expect more. The Cs seemed to scream, like a silent shout, “she’s average, just average.”


When I got home my mother was in the laundry room. I put both my hands out and she took the report card and flowers. She opened up the report card and with no disappointment on her face said, “Some of us are C people. Julie, don’t expect to do better than Cs.” Am I am still that C kid, now, in my second semester of college? I feel so average. Yet not. How am I going to get by? At least she wasn’t disappointed in me. Wasn’t she good not to be disappointed in me?


Thirty Years Later . . .


As an adult and a mother myself, I realize that in college I thought my mother was correct in not being disappointed with me. And as a child and young adult I wasn’t really upset at her considering me as an “average,” just a C. Yet I remembered this incident enough to journal about it. What does this thread tell me now? The truth is, when I pull on this thread now throughout my thirty years of journaling I find some painful insights. I discovered that even in my dreams my mother never thought of me as much more than a C person.


From this thread I followed other strands of insight. I recognized my ability to trust and believe in myself even when those around me couldn’t. I saw how I’d learned not to go to the hardware store for fruit salad (meaning, don’t go to someone for support and love when they don’t have it to give--go where you will get it). I found the thread of undying curiosity for truth. I found the thread that was my search for God. All these are threads to and from my journal entries about my mother. They are all threads of my true nature. They all tell me something of value about myself and my life.


The threads of your true nature


- How are you extraordinary? What do others not know about you that would make you extraordinary? Write about this. 
- Write about a memory you have about your mother or father. 
- Do you remember bringing home a report card? What happened? What feelings and thoughts did you have when your parent(s) read your report card? 
- Do you remember your walk or bus ride home on any particular day? Write about that.


You may feel far from it (true self), but it is never far from you.
-Lama Surya Das, poet, author, Buddhist spiritual teacher

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"Throughout the book are stories, discussions, and exercises, all aimed at showing us how, through the tool of journaling, we can gain a clear view of our past so that we see where we came from, how we got where we are today, and how we can stay on our individual paths for the future. This book is meant to tear away the illusion of what we are hungry for, and allow us to discover what the real thing is, and how we can get it for ourselves."

“. . . written with the young adult in mind . . . . Its inventive, different journaling techniques use meditations, oracle consultation, visualization rituals and more to aid the writing process, providing a satisfying mix of new age technique and writing advice.”

“What a wonderful book to help a teen or young adult gain insight into their identity and life's purpose! Lots of writing exercises, but this book is constructed to make these a joy instead of a homework-type chore. . . . Spiritual Journaling: Writing Your Way to Independence is a great book for a young person interested in self-exploration or going through a transition.”

"This is a powerful tool for awakening the imaginative voice in any young adult and helping them realize their very own creative potential, truly a priceless gift."

Meet the Author

A licensed psychotherapist and creative writing teacher, Julie Tallard Johnson has kept journals since the age of sixteen discovering how the writer and spiritual path are one and the same. She has spent the last thirty years working with individuals and groups to help them discover a spiritual practice that brings them a sense of purpose and happiness. The author of many books for teens including Teen Psychic, Spiritual Journaling, The Thundering Years, I Ching for Teens and Making Friends, Falling in Love, which was recognized by the New York Public Library as one of the best books for teens, she lives in Spring Green, Wisconsin.

Visit the author's web site at Julietallardjohnson.com

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