Spiritual Marketplace: Baby Boomers and the Remaking of American Religion

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Overview

In large chain bookstores the "religion" section is gone and in its place is an expanding number of topics including angels, Sufism, journey, recovery, meditation, magic, inspiration, Judaica, astrology, gurus, Bible, prophesy, evangelicalism, Mary, Buddhism, Catholicism, and esoterica. As Wade Clark Roof notes, such changes over the last two decades reflect a shift away from religion as traditionally understood to more diverse and creative approaches. But what does this splintering of the religious perspective say about Americans? Have we become more interested in spiritual concerns or have we become lost among trends? Do we value personal spirituality over traditional religion and no longer see ourselves united in a larger community of faith? Roof first credited this religious diversity to the baby boomers in his bestselling A Generation of Seekers (1993). He returns to interview many of these people, now in mid-life, to reveal a generation with a unique set of spiritual values—a generation that has altered our historic interpretations of religious beliefs, practices, and symbols, and perhaps even our understanding of the sacred itself.

The quest culture created by the baby boomers has generated a "marketplace" of new spiritual beliefs and practices and of revisited traditions. As Roof shows, some Americans are exploring faiths and spiritual disciplines for the first time; others are rediscovering their lost traditions; others are drawn to small groups and alternative communities; and still others create their own mix of values and metaphysical beliefs. Spiritual Marketplace charts the emergence of five subcultures: dogmatists, born-again Christians, mainstream believers, metaphysical believers and seekers, and secularists. Drawing on surveys and in-depth interviews for over a decade, Roof reports on the religious and spiritual styles, family patterns, and moral vision and values for each of these subcultures. The result is an innovative, engaging approach to understanding how religious life is being reshaped as we move into the next century.

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Editorial Reviews

Los Angeles Times
Baffingly diverse and in a state of historic flux, American religion today defies easy generalization. Wade Clark Roof has tackled the challenge admirably, doing a yeoman's job at compiling vast amounts of often surprising information. . . .
Books & Culture
What does it mean [to be] spiritual? That's what Roof has set out to ask and to answer: to track, capture, and name the current varieties of religious or spiritual experience in America. What he's come up with is a kind of metaphysical seed-catalog, a bewildering array of groups and sub-groups, beliefs and opinions, views and world-views, much of it mixed and matched.
— Mark Buchanan
Choice
Roof writes in a jargon-free, accessible style, often lucidly summarizing (and challenging) the arguments of other sociologists and cultural observers.
Sociology of Religion
Full of interesting findings and provocative interpretations.
Journal of the American Academy of Religion
A significant contribution to understanding trends in the lived religion of many Americans in their question for meaning.
— Jackson W. Carroll
Phi Beta Kappa The Key Reporter

This is a terrific book . . . Roof clearly demonstrates the old saw that people create their gods, not vice versa.
The Key Reporter (Phi Beta Kappa)
This is a terrific book . . . Roof clearly demonstrates the old saw that people create their gods, not vice versa.
Spiritus
This is a seminal study for the sociology of religion. It should be considered indispensable to anyone trying to take the spiritual pulse of America.
— John A. Coleman
Books & Culture - Mark Buchanan
What does it mean [to be] spiritual? That's what Roof has set out to ask and to answer: to track, capture, and name the current varieties of religious or spiritual experience in America. What he's come up with is a kind of metaphysical seed-catalog, a bewildering array of groups and sub-groups, beliefs and opinions, views and world-views, much of it mixed and matched.
S.J., Spiritus - John A. Coleman
This is a seminal study for the sociology of religion. It should be considered indispensable to anyone trying to take the spiritual pulse of America.
Journal of the American Academy of Religion - Jackson W. Carroll
A significant contribution to understanding trends in the lived religion of many Americans in their question for meaning.
From the Publisher
"This book shows not only how the 76 million boomers have been shaped by such seeking but how they have remapped the spiritual landscape for all Americans; boomers have shifted attention from the institution to the individual, emphasized 'lived religion' (religion in practice) and created a 'quest culture'."Publishers Weekly

"Baffingly diverse and in a state of historic flux, American religion today defies easy generalization. Wade Clark Roof has tackled the challenge admirably, doing a yeoman's job at compiling vast amounts of often surprising information. . . ."Los Angeles Times

"Roof's work thoughtfully articulates the introspective fluidity of the baby-boom generation he studies."Publishers Weekly

"What does it mean [to be] spiritual? That's what Roof has set out to ask and to answer: to track, capture, and name the current varieties of religious or spiritual experience in America. What he's come up with is a kind of metaphysical seed-catalog, a bewildering array of groups and sub-groups, beliefs and opinions, views and world-views, much of it mixed and matched."—Mark Buchanan, Books & Culture

"Roof writes in a jargon-free, accessible style, often lucidly summarizing (and challenging) the arguments of other sociologists and cultural observers."Choice

"This is a terrific book . . . Roof clearly demonstrates the old saw that people create their gods, not vice versa."The Key Reporter, Phi Beta Kappa

"Full of interesting findings and provocative interpretations."Sociology of Religion

"This is a seminal study for the sociology of religion. It should be considered indispensable to anyone trying to take the spiritual pulse of America."—John A. Coleman, S.J., Spiritus

"A significant contribution to understanding trends in the lived religion of many Americans in their question for meaning."—Jackson W. Carroll, Journal of the American Academy of Religion

Books & Culture
What does it mean [to be] spiritual? That's what Roof has set out to ask and to answer: to track, capture, and name the current varieties of religious or spiritual experience in America. What he's come up with is a kind of metaphysical seed-catalog, a bewildering array of groups and sub-groups, beliefs and opinions, views and world-views, much of it mixed and matched.
— Mark Buchanan
Phi Beta Kappa The Key Reporter
This is a terrific book . . . Roof clearly demonstrates the old saw that people create their gods, not vice versa.
Teresa Watanabe
Trying to make sense of the American religious scene on the eve of the new millennium is a courageous enterprise. Bafflingly diverse and in a state of historic flux, American religion today defies easy generalization. Wade Clark Roof, a religion professor at UC Santa Barbara, has tackled the challenge admirably, doing a yeoman's job at compiling vast amounts of often surprising information in his latest book, Spiritual Marketplace: Baby Boomers and the Remaking of American Religion. The book is a follow-up to his widely acclaimed 1993 survey on the spiritual journey of the baby boomers, whom Roof memorably described as "the questers." Roof's new book integrates follow-up data on five religious subgroups--mainstream, born-agains, metaphysical seekers, dogmatists and secularists--with a wealth of secondary source material. He also presents close-up looks at five seekers. The close-up portraits help make the book more reader-friendly.
Los Angeles Times
Jonathan F. Creedon
In this follow-up to A Generation of Seekers, Roof adds new depth to his ongoing study of America's restless quest at century's end. What does it say about the novel today that one of the most revealing portaits of the culture's inner life happens to be the work of a sociologist?
Utne Reader
Kirkus Reviews
Another dose of Baby Boomer religion from Roof (Dept. of Religious Studies/UC-Santa Barbara), once again arguing that boomers are, as the title of one of his earlier books puts it, A Generation of Seekers.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691089966
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 7/2/2001
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 1,097,522
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.26 (h) x 0.94 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix
INTRODUCTION On Maps and Terrains 3
CHAPTER 1 Varieties of Spiritual Quest 16
CHAPTER 2 The Making of a Quest Culture 46
CHAPTER 3 Spiritual Marketplace 77
CHAPTER 4 On Being Fluid and Grounded III
CHAPTER 5 A Quest for What? 145
CHAPTER 6 Redrawing the Boundaries 180
CHAPTER 7 Realigning Family and Religion 217
CHAPTER 8 Moral Vision and Values 254
CONCLUSION "Whirl Is King, Having Driven Out Zeus" 294
APPENDIX Methodology 315
Notes 325
Index 361

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