Spit and Passion
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Spit and Passion

by Cristy C. Road
     
 

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“I’m a big Cristy C. Road fan. Spit and Passion is a graphic delight, and the depiction of awkward youth is spot-on, weird, and familiar.—Alison Bechdel, author of Fun Home

“Cristy C. Road is the Jack Kerouac of the young queer generation. She’s as brilliant a writer as she is an illustrator.”—Kate

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Overview

“I’m a big Cristy C. Road fan. Spit and Passion is a graphic delight, and the depiction of awkward youth is spot-on, weird, and familiar.—Alison Bechdel, author of Fun Home

“Cristy C. Road is the Jack Kerouac of the young queer generation. She’s as brilliant a writer as she is an illustrator.”—Kate Bornstein, author of A Queer and Pleasant Danger

"Cristy C. Road is a bad ass. She has a list of published work that leaves me awed and inspired."—Billie Joe Armstrong, Green Day

"Road's writing has long brought to vivid life the experiences of a queer-identified Latina punk rocker."—Bitch

At its core, Spit and Passion is about the transformative moment when music crashes into a stifling adolescent bedroom and saves you. Suddenly, you belong.

At twelve years old, Cristy C. Road is trying to balance the values of a Cuban Catholic family with her newfound queer identity, and begins a chronic obsession with the punk band Green Day. In this stunning graphic memoir, Road renders the clash between her rich inner world of fantasy and the numbing suburban conformity she is surrounded by. She finds solace in the closet—where she lets her deep excitement about punk rock foment and, in that angst and euphoria, finds a path to self-acceptance.

Cristy C. Road has reached cult status for work that captures the beauty of the imperfect. Her career began with Greenzine, a punk rock zine, which she made for ten years. She has since published Indestructible, an illustrated novel about high school; Distance Makes the Heart Grow Sick, a postcard book; and Bad Habits, a love story about self-destruction and healing. She has also illustrated countless album covers, book jackets, and political organization propaganda. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Veteran punk writer and illustrator Road weaves text and art together in a charming and angst-ridden coming-of-age story. Cuban-American and raised in a traditional Catholic family, the preteen Road has a number of identity issues: she does not fit into her cultural mold, she finds salvation in punk rock, and she has a conflicted gender identity. Embracing her tomboy nature, Road begins to come to terms with herself as a gay woman, building a closet for her secret that becomes her refuge. Road’s identification with her teenage self feels genuine, and her recollections of pop culture (both embraced and rejected) of the 1990s will strike nostalgic chords in readers of that generation. Road balances long sections of prose with pages dominated by art; her pencil and marker style, with images populated by strange and imperfect-looking characters, is well suited to her story, even if the ending doesn’t entirely solve her identity issues. Grotesque images of dangling eyeballs and gushing brains reflect the alternative scene the young Road has discovered. Readers who enjoyed Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home will probably empathize with Road’s story of sexual exploration and punk rock. (Nov.)
From the Publisher

“Road, an artist and writer, borrowed her nom de plum from a Green Day song title, which gives you some idea of the punky, exuberant spirit behind her graphic memoir about growing up gay in a very Catholic Cuban family from Miami.” —Entertainment Weekly

"Veteran punk writer and illustrator Road weaves text and art together in a charming and angst-ridden coming-of-age story. Cuban-American and raised in a traditional Catholic family, the preteen Road has a number of identity issues: she does not fit into her cultural mold, she finds salvation in punk rock, and she has a conflicted gender identity. Embracing her tomboy nature, Road begins to come to terms with herself as a gay woman, building a closet for her secret that becomes her refuge. Road’s identification with her teenage self feels genuine, and her recollections of pop culture (both embraced and rejected) of the 1990s will strike nostalgic chords in readers of that generation. Road balances long sections of prose with pages dominated by art; her pencil and marker style, with images populated by strange and imperfect-looking characters, is well suited to her story, even if the ending doesn’t entirely solve her identity issues. Grotesque images of dangling eyeballs and gushing brains reflect the alternative scene the young Road has discovered. Readers who enjoyed Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home will probably empathize with Road’s story of sexual exploration and punk rock." —Publishers Weekly

"I'm a big Cristy C. Roads fan. Spit & Passion is a graphic delight, and the depiction of awkward youth is spot-on, weird, and familiar.
Alison Bechdel, author of Fun Home

"Cristy C. Road is the Jack Kerouac of the young queer generation. She's as brilliant a writer as she is an illustrator."—Kate Bornstein, author of A Queer and Pleasant Danger

Library Journal
At age ten, Cristina is drawn to daring songs and to women dancing. Recognizing her emerging gay self, she says she "tried to pretend everyone on earth was gay," but kept it to herself within her warm Cuban Catholic family. Over the next two years, she develops a rich inner life, drawing support from the punk-rock music of Green Day and gay-positive celebrities such as Roseanne Barr and Ellen DeGeneres. She feels safe in her closet for the time being, as "sometimes the doorways felt like pillars, the clothing on the racks like tropical foliage, and the ground like the ocean." The book is more prose-illustration hybrid than comics, since Road's long and fascinating monologues of intellectual post-processing about sexual identity intercut the art. VERDICT The queer Latina experience is underdocumented in general and especially in comics. Freelance illustrator Road excels with portraiture of the transgressive fringe. Her quirky, evocative drawings, black and white with tan wash, seem almost like brain-captures depicting memories of people and feelings. Good for teen collections where gay-identity material is acceptable for this age group. Road includes F-bombs and mention of masturbation but nothing explicit.—M.C.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781558618077
Publisher:
Feminist Press at CUNY, The
Publication date:
10/23/2012
Series:
Blindspot Graphics
Pages:
128
Sales rank:
1,154,740
Product dimensions:
6.80(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.20(d)
Age Range:
12 Years

Meet the Author


Cristy C. Road is what Billie Joe Armstrong, lead singer of Green Day, calls "a BAD ASS"! Born thirty years ago in Miami, she began illustrating and publishing a punk rock zine, Green'zine. She then published her widely acclaimed graphic memoir, Bad Habit (Soft Skull, 2008) and Indestructible (Microcosm, 2006), a graphic novel, and started touring nationally and internationally with Sister Spit, with her band, The Homewreckers, and on her own. Her work has appeared on countless record and book covers, in zines, political posters, signs, and in anthologies and magazines. Spit and Passion is Road's pre-teen memoir about coming out, finding religion (not what you think), and her chronic obsession with Green Day. She hibernates in Brooklyn, New York.

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