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Splendid Friend, Indeed
     

Splendid Friend, Indeed

3.8 6
by Suzanne Bloom
 

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Bear wants to read and write and think. Goose wants to talk and talk and talk. Can Bear and Goose be friends? Suzanne Bloom's picture book says volumes about friendship with a few select words and charming illustrations in this Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor Book .

Overview


Bear wants to read and write and think. Goose wants to talk and talk and talk. Can Bear and Goose be friends? Suzanne Bloom's picture book says volumes about friendship with a few select words and charming illustrations in this Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor Book .

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
PreS-K-A friendly, talkative goose endears himself to a contemplative polar bear. On each spread, Bear practices a quiet activity, such as reading, writing, and thinking. And each time, Goose interrupts by asking what he is doing and then taking over the activity. When Bear spends his time thinking, Goose declares, "Thinking makes me hungry." He makes a snack and reads a note that he's written to Bear that describes him as "my splendid friend." Bear is touched by the friendship note and responds by giving Goose a big bear hug. The large format makes the book ideal for group sharing and the oversized text is accessible to beginning readers. The cool palette of the pastel illustrations, consisting of shades of blue and white and touches of violet, sets a quiet, friendly tone, and the animals' priceless expressions tell all. The gentle humor will elicit giggles; Goose's silly statements and Bear's patient responses beg to be read aloud. An ideal book for storytimes about friendship and sharing.-Shawn Brommer, South Central Library System, Madison, WI Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A more perfect union between giggle-inducing but reassuring images and a text of very few words is hard to conjure. The brilliant pastels open on a double-page spread of Goose trotting down a huge hairy mound, which turns out to be Bear, lying on his stomach with a book. "What are you doing? Are you reading?" asks Goose, perched on Bear's head. "I like to read" says Goose, sitting directly in front of Bear's book, and reading to him. Bear takes out his notebook and starts to write, and Goose wants Bear to see him write. Bear, visibly growing increasingly exasperated, is thinking now, and Goose notes that thinking makes him hungry and goes off to make a snack. He returns with a snack, a blanket and a note for Bear, who at this point is trying to hide behind his notebook. "You are my splendid friend," reads Goose's note, and Bear wipes away a tear and wraps Goose in a huge hug before the two sit down to share the snack. Bear's ursine fuzziness against a background of deep blues and Goose's small awkward, overeager self make an adorable contrast. (Picture book. 3-6)
From the Publisher

"Bloom gets maximum effect with minimum words. . . . Fun to read aloud, the book will also lead to discussion about friendly (and annoying) behavior." --Booklist

* "The gentle humor will elicit giggles; Goose's silly statements and Bear's patient responses beg to be read aloud. An ideal book for storytimes about friendship and sharing." --School Library Journal, starred review

* "A more perfect union between giggle-inducing but reassuring images and a text of very few words is hard to conjure." --Kirkus Reviews, starred review

Children's Literature - Susan Treadway
How do you respond to a very talkative companion who keeps interrupting with rather kind and inviting conversation? Bear tries to be quiet and alone doing what Bear wants to do. Yet, both Bear and Goose display volumes of engaging communication with delightful expressions. Bear is definitely not interested in communicating with Goose. Goose distracts Bear while he tries to read a bright red book, and offers to read to Bear. A very nice idea, but Bear declines. Next, Goose offers to write for Bear. Clearly, Bear becomes annoyed. Goose remains pliable, quite friendly, but maybe a tad too persistent. When Bear assumes “The Thinker” pose, Goose suddenly makes them a snack. That just might do the trick. Bear begins to resist when a colorful handmade note warms his heart to the core, showing that genuine friendship wins out every time. Bright pastels on deep blue pages with simple text bring Goose and Bear alive in fun ways. Powerful lessons are shared with tremendous insight and whimsy. Reviewer: Susan Treadway; Ages 2 to 5.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780955199899
Publisher:
Alanna
Publication date:
09/28/2010
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Suzanne Bloom: Suzanne Bloom is the author and illustrator of the Goose and Bear books, including Treasure; What About Bear?; Oh! What a Surprise; Fox Forgets; and Alone Together. She lives in McDonough, New York. Visit suzannebloom.com

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Splendid Friend, Indeed 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
psycheKK More than 1 year ago
Pesky characters in books appeal to me, like Willems' pigeon and Numeroff's mouse. I'm not sure why, they just do. So I find the irritating goose in A Splendid Friend, Indeed charming. But even more than the goose, I love the patient polar bear. He's the perfect foil to the silly goose. The friendly pair are well-drawn -- the bear's fur is magnificent -- and expressive. Bloom brings them to life using pastels, which is not an easy medium to work with.  The story itself is so simple that a toddler has not trouble following it, especially when enhanced by the excellent illustrations.
Fresca125 More than 1 year ago
The spectacular illustrations in the picture book "A Splendid Friend, Indeed" by Suzanne Bloom capture the frustration of the Bear, whose solitary reading and writing are continually interrupted by a persistent Goose. The studious Bear becomes annoyed as the Goose begins to disturb him while he is trying to read and write. Will the Bear stop the Goose from bothering him, or will there be a surprise element in the story? This is a very funny story with a warm message about not judging others. I strongly suggest this book for any teacher in the K-1st grade classes in elementary schools. This book has great illustration that the students will enjoy as they read. Activities that I would have the student do are draw pictures of the Bear and the Goose and talk about a situation that reminds them of the characters. Another activity I would have the students do is make their own picture book that is similar to in the picture book "A Splendid Friend, Indeed" by Suzanne Bloom.
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