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Splinter Fleet: The Wooden Subchasers of World War II
     

Splinter Fleet: The Wooden Subchasers of World War II

5.0 4
by Theodore R. Treadwell
 

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Hastily built at the onset of World War II to stop German U-boats from taking their toll on Allied shipping, the 110-foot wooden subchasers were the smallest commissioned warships in the U.S. Navy, yet they saw as much action as ships ten times their size. In every theater of war these “expendable” workhorses of the fleet escorted countless convoys of

Overview


Hastily built at the onset of World War II to stop German U-boats from taking their toll on Allied shipping, the 110-foot wooden subchasers were the smallest commissioned warships in the U.S. Navy, yet they saw as much action as ships ten times their size. In every theater of war these “expendable” workhorses of the fleet escorted countless convoys of slow-moving ships through submarine-infested waters, conducted endless mind-numbing antisubmarine patrols, and were used in hundreds of amphibious operations. Some subchasers worked as gunboats to search for and destroy enemy barges. Others rescued downed airmen and retrieved drowning soldiers under heavy enemy fire. During the German occupation of Norway, three American-built subchasers and their Norwegian crews came to be known as “The Shetlands Bus” for their clandestine work as ferries—the only link between Norway and the free world.

This book, written by the commander of one of the subchasers, defines their place in naval history and gives readers a taste of life on board the wooden warships. Ringing with authenticity, it describes the cramped quarters and unforgiving seas as well as the tenacious courage and close bonds formed by the men as they sought out the enemy and confronted nature. Long overshadowed by the larger, faster warships and more glamorous PT boats of World War II, subchasers have been mostly forgotten. This work restores the plucky little ships to their hard-earned status as significant members of the fleet.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Wooden subchasers were the smallest commissioned warships in the US Navy during WWII, yet they saw as much action as ships ten times their size. This book, written by the commander of one of the subchasers, defines their place in naval history and gives readers a taste of life aboard the wooden warships and the close bonds formed by the men as they sought out enemy submarines. Many of the b&w photos were taken by the author. Treadwell had a career in the packaging industry after he left the Navy at the end of the war. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781557508171
Publisher:
Naval Institute Press
Publication date:
11/28/2000
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
6.23(w) x 9.27(h) x 0.99(d)

Meet the Author


The author passed away in 2011.

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Splinter Fleet: The Wooden Subchasers of World War II 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
THIS IS THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE HISTORY OF THE SMALLEST COMMISSIONED SHIPS DURING WW II IT IS THOROUGH , EXCELLENT AND REFLECTS THE GREAT AMOUNT OF RESEARCH AND DILIGENCE BY THE AUTHOR . IT IS A MEMORABLE HISTORY OF THE 'HOOLIGAN NAVY ' SOMETIMES CALLED ' THE DUNGAREE NAVY ' DESPITE HAVING COMMANDED TWO SC'S - THE SC 677 IN THE SOLOMON ISLANDS AND THE SC 1353 IN THE ATLANTIC - I WAS ASTONISHED AT WHAT I LEARNED
Guest More than 1 year ago
This well written account of the 110' wooden submarine chasers used in WWII provides readers of all levels with great insight into the interesting and important role these tiny vessels played in the war. Well researched and written in a style that lay persons as well as seasoned naval researchers can appreciate, this book is very interesting and gives the reader the feel of salt spray while filling a gap in nautical history that before was untold. Many photos and anecdotes as well as interviews with veteran subchasermen provide realism without being over embellished. Has many oddities such as the write up and picture of the before unknown decoy subchaser modified to look like an aircraft carrier to draw in kamikaze pilots! Intersting reading.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A book written by men who were there, who experienced all the horrors and the laughter of the Pacific war years..A must read for all people interested in naval history .
Guest More than 1 year ago
If anyone would like to truly learn about this little known chapter of American Naval History, I heartily recommend this book. Mr. Treadwell offers the reader information and facts that I've never found before in any other book, anywhere on this subject. Until I read the book, I wouldn't have known what a subchaser was. This book has left me feeling much more familiar with these mighty wooden ships and the numerous tasks they perfomed during World War 2 and even what happened to some of them after the war. Treadwell presents his writing in an easy to follow manner and makes this a hard book to put aside. Great photos are included to keep the reader's interest. Anyone who enjoys military history would surely be proud to add a copy of 'Splinter Fleet' to their library. I know I am.