Spook Who Sat by the Door

( 9 )
Sending request ...

Overview

This book is both a satire of the civil rights problems in the United States in the late 60s and a serious attempt to focuses on the issue of black militancy.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Sacred Fire
The Spook Who Sat by the Door was originally brought into print by a small publisher, Richard Baron Press, and quickly became an underground favorite. Published in the near aftermath of the Black Power movement, The Spook fictionalized the urban- based war for liberation that never quite manifested.

Senator Gilbert Hennington is in a close race for reelection and needs an issue with which to galvanize the Negro vote. His answer: a public call for the integration of the heretofore lily- white Central Intelligence Agency at its Field Operatives level. Of the hundreds who applied, twenty-three are chosen for training under express orders that no one successfully complete the course. With the exception of one, Dan Freeman, they are eliminated. Exasperated at Freeman's tenacity, Calhoun, the agency's judo instructor, tells him, "Im going to give you a chance. You just walk up to the head office and resign and that will be it. Otherwise, we fight until you do. And you will not leave this room until I have whipped you and you walk out of here, or crawl out of here, or are carried out of here and resign. Do I make myself clear?" Midway through the fight, Freeman wondered if he could keep from killing this white man. No, he thought, he's not worth it.... But he does have an ass-kicking coming and he can't handle it. This cat can't believe a nigger can whip him. Well, he'll believe it when I'm through. . .

Freeman is never assigned to the field, but is given a glass- enclosed office where he sits in display. But he has a plan and soon resigns, returning to Chicago to organize the Cobras, a street gang, into an armed and skilled insurgency unit. On a hot Chicago night, a police killing sparks the riot that becomes the war led by Freeman and the Cobras, now dubbed Uncle Tom and the Freedom Fighters. Fast-paced, well written, entertaming, memorable.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Sam Greenlee is a highly acclaimed, internationally known poet, novelist, playwright, screenwriter, producer, director, actor, and teacher. A former U.S. Information Agency Foreign Service officer, he is the author of Baghdad Blues and two collections of poetry.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2001

    More for the 'impression', than the 'substance'

    Reading a novel is just like looking at an inkspot. The reader often interprets the symbols by what is foremost in their subconsciousness, rather than what is actually written. If your views are dark and violent, then that inkspot is bloody or vile. If your views are light and peaceful, then the inkspot is silky chocolate or a gravy stain. I read 'The Spook' many years ago. The impression, not the substance of the book, was one of the most vivid in my young life. A major turning point in my life. The main message of the book for me, was the importance of being underestimated, by both your enemies and your loved ones. Being underestimated by your enemies is a necessary and lethal weapon which can lull them into complacency or a false sense of superiority. And ultimatley, defeat. Being underestmated by your loved ones, can be a pleasant surprise, when you come to their aid or give them something that they never expected. This book taught me to quietly and methodically seek and conquer the obstacles in my life. To do...not talk. To celebrate...not boast. That it is more important to be successful than to appear successful.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2003

    Confused

    I bought this book because I heard the title of it plugged in a sociology book. I was under the impression that the whole book would be about a man who worked with the CIA to find out their faults and see what it's like for a black man to work under these circumstances. But then he left the CIA within a few chapters and I was like 'What?' The rest of the book...? I really don't know what rating to give this book. I don't agree with killing for freedom but at the same time, I ironically understood many of Freeman's decisions. I can't give this book five stars because I don't agree with the overall turn-out of the book, but I would have to give it four and a half because it was a page-turner, interesting, intriguing, enlightening, and educational. This is definitely a clean, tight story with an organized writer.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 6, 2009

    The Spook Who Sat By he Door...Greenlee

    This book was a Valentine's Day gift from my husband. I had been saying for about 2 years (after I heard about this book) that I wanted to read it. Well, I did. It was poignant and I am glad that I got to read it. I highly recommend this read that will cause you to laugh and want to cry. It speaks to some of the thought patterns that is evident today...timeless.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2002

    When I was a Child

    When I was about 12 years old, I read this book, I was an avid reader as I am now. This book will remind you of Colendozza Rice and Colin Powell. This book was written before there were significant numbers of minorities in the Civil Service. I would advise any one who studies race realtions to read this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2000

    'Spook' a Harbinger of Things Yet to Come

    The Spook Who Sat by the Door is no 'eerie tale' as some critics have dubbed it but, indeed, outlines a situation which could really happen if white people continue to oppress racial minorities. In fact, white people were so afraid of the possibility of 'infiltration of the CIA by blacks' that they banned the movie version of the book! A black man 'toms' his way to the top of his craft but, in his spare time and the wee hours, is training a cadre of black revolutionaries to take over America. Although the plot is uncovered by book's end, thke revolution is put into motion and those who read it will see how simple it is to trick the white man and how easy it would be to cripple this system.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 23, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    it has a point to make

    I remember this book when I was in high school my senior year I thought it was a good book to read. At the time I was deny a job that I thought I was getting and the employer said so to but when I reported to work, he said that I had a record and he could not employ me because of that fact. it was a lie I was very upset I knew it was because he wanted to give it to someone else. I'll leave it like that. But a friend gave me this book to read and it made since to me why he did what he did the book didn't make me angry but aware of what's going on in the work force so I educated myself so I could be the employer instead of being the employee. Being older now I still say it's a good book to read it has a point to make. And it did just that I give it a 4 star

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2006

    The Power of Knowledge

    I remember reading this book when I was in Junior High in the Bronx. I was in awe about what can black people can do if we would just united. Currently, I am serving my country in the Air Force and in my squad of 8 we are all black. Sometimes we would sit around and talk about issues that face our people today. After watching the movie version of this book. Alot of us decided to write the follow up stories. To me and alot of us black military members we love this book and it is a great inspiration to us all.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2004

    SKIMMING THE WATERS OF NONFICTION

    At first, I refused to read any ficitonal books based on the urgency to acquire factual knowledge. After finally giving in to my brother's pleads to read it, a whole new world appeared. The world of imagination, creativity, and transliteration. So, I recommend the book to all the nonfictional zealous brothers out there (like myself).

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2003

    It will take all of us!

    This book is a must read for any and every one of African decent. This compelling book must be taught to children in every house hold by 'us'. We must take the responsibility for 'our' own and this book along with others like 'the Isis papers' but more importantly 'MIS-Education of the Negro' will take us there..if we are willing to go!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)