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The Spy: A Tale of the Neutral Ground
     

The Spy: A Tale of the Neutral Ground

2.6 13
by James Fenimore Cooper
 

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Published in 1821, THE SPY took for its theme the American Revolutionary War. Cooper vividly describes the conflicting interests of British and Americans in this tale of valor, fortitude and danger.

Harvey Birch is the hero, a true American and patriot. Birch's various disguises and incredible escapes rivet our attention. He is one of the most memorable characters

Overview

Published in 1821, THE SPY took for its theme the American Revolutionary War. Cooper vividly describes the conflicting interests of British and Americans in this tale of valor, fortitude and danger.

Harvey Birch is the hero, a true American and patriot. Birch's various disguises and incredible escapes rivet our attention. He is one of the most memorable characters in American literature, drawn so realistically that many men claimed to be the actual person Cooper had depicted. Flight and hot pursuit, contrasting styles of gentlemen and country folk, and the exciting historical events surrounding our revolution make this story as stirring today as it was on its publication more than a century and a half ago.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Written in 1821, this historical novel is Cooper's paean to the Revolutionary War, as protagonist Harry Birch finds himself wrongly accused of selling vital information to the British. The book incorporates several real characters, including George Washington.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940019575664
Publisher:
New York, G.P. Putnam's sons
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
871 KB

Meet the Author

James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851) grew up at Otsego Hall, his father’s manorial estate near Lake Otsego in upstate New York. Educated at Yale, he spent five years at sea, as a foremast hand and then as a midshipman in the navy. At thirty he was suddenly plunged into a literary career when his wife challenged his claim that he could write a better book that the English novel he was reading to her. The result was Precaution (1820), a novel of manners. His second book, The Spy (1821), was an immediate success, and with The Pioneers (1823) he began his series of Leatherstocking Tales. By 1826 when The Last of the Mohicans appeared, his standing as a major novelist was clearly established. From 1826 to 1833 Cooper and his family lived and traveled in France, Switzerland, Italy, and Germany. Two of his most successful works, The Prairie and The Red Rover, were published in 1827. He returned to Otsego Hall in 1834, and after a series of relatively unsuccessful books of essays, travel sketches, and history, he returned to fiction – and to Leatherstocking – with The Pathfinder (1840) and The Deerslayer (1841). In his last decade he faced declining popularity brought on in part by his waspish attacks on critics and political opponents. Just before his death in 1851 an edition of his works led to a reappraisal of his fiction and somewhat restored his reputation as the first of American writers.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
September 15, 1789
Date of Death:
September 14, 1851
Place of Birth:
Burlington, New Jersey
Place of Death:
Cooperstown, New York
Education:
Yale University (expelled in 1805)

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The Spy 2.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Horrible copy!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very bad quality
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love spy novels, but this stinks the big one
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