Spy Killer

Spy Killer

3.3 57
by L. Ron Hubbard
     
 

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American Sailor Kurt Reid is a hothead—as scrappy and rough around the edges as Jimmy Cagney.  Falsely accused of murder, Reid jumps ship in Shanghai—and lands in a web of intrigue, betrayal, and murder.  Drawn into a deadly spy game, he’ll have to learn the rules fast, because with players like sexy Russian agent Varinka Savischna, the… See more details below

Overview

American Sailor Kurt Reid is a hothead—as scrappy and rough around the edges as Jimmy Cagney.  Falsely accused of murder, Reid jumps ship in Shanghai—and lands in a web of intrigue, betrayal, and murder.  Drawn into a deadly spy game, he’ll have to learn the rules fast, because with players like sexy Russian agent Varinka Savischna, the game is as seductive as it is sinister.

As a young man, Hubbard visited pre-Communist China three times, where his closest friend headed up British intelligence.  In a land where communists, nationalists, war lords and foreign adventurers schemed for control, Hubbard gained a unique insight into the intelligence operations and spy-craft in the region—a knowledge that informs stories like Spy Killer.

 “Vividly written, super-fast-paced.”
—Ellery Queen

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

This classic 1936 Hubbard tale takes listeners to pre-Communist China where a man named Kurt Reid has fled murder charges only to find himself thrust into the exotic world of foreign espionage. This multicast performance brings an air of the old radio theater shows of the '30s and '40s, transporting listeners to another time and place. An exceptional performance by Lori Jablons is a true highlight of this production, as she assumes the role of the mysterious and beautiful Russian rebel, Varinka Savischna. With the perfect blend of background sounds that are often as simple as crowd murmuring or distant animal noises, the result is a genuinely entertaining listening experience. A Galaxy Press paperback.(Sept.)

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Midwest Book Review
Offering the reader a true 'roller coaster' ride of intrigue, suspense, action and adventure, Spy Killer is pulp fiction at its best.
Library Journal

Hubbard wrote a ton of pulp stories in every genre during the 1930s and 1940s. Galaxy is reissuing all of them in paperback-80 books in all (told you it was a ton). Each book features a killer pulp cover along with other illustrations, a glossary (parts of a ship for the briny swashbucklers, etc.), and background on the author.


—Michael Rogers
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up—"Kurt went to the back of the room and found the round-faced, slit-eyed proprietor." So goes the story of Kurt Reid, who has been accused of murder, and his adventures on "the Yellow Continent." Originally published in 1936, this is part of a series of stories by L. Ron Hubbard that have been recorded by a full cast, with music and sound effects. Like a lot of pulp fiction from that era, there are obvious stereotypes and distinct language that will make it a difficult sell to today's audiences. The narration is very dramatic, but the accents used for the Russian and Chinese characters border on ridiculous. Unless it is tied to a lesson on cultural stereotypes of the past or American pulp fiction, skip this title.—Genevieve Gallagher, Charlottesville High School, VA
From the Publisher

“Offering the reader a true ‘roller coaster’ ride of intrigue, suspense, action and adventure, Spy Killer is pulp fiction at its best.” —Midwest Book Review

“A superb storyteller with total mastery of plot and pacing.” —Publishers Weekly

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781592126170
Publisher:
Galaxy Press, LLC
Publication date:
09/08/2008
Series:
Mystery & Suspense Short Stories Collection
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
121
Sales rank:
1,067,500
File size:
1 MB
Age Range:
10 Years

Read an Excerpt

As he wrung the water from his clothes he discarded his memories one by one. As mate of the Rangoon, he had been known as a bucko sailor, a hard case who struck first and questioned afterward, renowned for a temper as hot and swift as a glowing rapier.

And the reputation had not helped him when the captain had been found dead in his cabin and when it was discovered that the safe was open and empty. Kurt Reid had been the last man to see the captain alive, so they thought.

Shanghai stretched before him, and behind it lay all of China. If he could not escape there, he thought, he deserved to die. His only regret now was the lack of money he had been accused of stealing. A man does not go far on a few American dollars.

L. Ron Hubbard


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