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SQL and Relational Theory: How to Write Accurate SQL Code
     

SQL and Relational Theory: How to Write Accurate SQL Code

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by C. J. Date
 

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SQL is full of difficulties and traps for the unwary. You can avoid them if you understand relational theory, but only if you know how to put the theory into practice. In this insightful book, author C.J. Date explains relational theory in depth, and demonstrates through numerous examples and exercises how you can apply it directly to your use of SQL.

This second

Overview

SQL is full of difficulties and traps for the unwary. You can avoid them if you understand relational theory, but only if you know how to put the theory into practice. In this insightful book, author C.J. Date explains relational theory in depth, and demonstrates through numerous examples and exercises how you can apply it directly to your use of SQL.

This second edition includes new material on recursive queries, “missing information” without nulls, new update operators, and topics such as aggregate operators, grouping and ungrouping, and view updating. If you have a modest-to-advanced background in SQL, you’ll learn how to deal with a host of common SQL dilemmas.

  • Why is proper column naming so important?
  • Nulls in your database are causing you to get wrong answers. Why? What can you do about it?
  • Is it possible to write an SQL query to find employees who have never been in the same department for more than six months at a time?
  • SQL supports “quantified comparisons,” but they’re better avoided. Why? How do you avoid them?
  • Constraints are crucially important, but most SQL products don’t support them properly. What can you do to resolve this situation?

Database theory and practice have evolved since the relational model was developed more than 40 years ago. SQL and Relational Theory draws on decades of research to present the most up-to-date treatment of SQL available.

C.J. Date has a stature that is unique within the database industry. A prolific writer well known for the bestselling textbook An Introduction to Database Systems (Addison-Wesley), he has an exceptionally clear style when writing about complex principles and theory.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781449316402
Publisher:
O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
Publication date:
12/30/2011
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
448
Product dimensions:
6.90(w) x 9.20(h) x 1.10(d)

Meet the Author

C.J. Date has a stature that is unique within the database industry. C.J. is a prolific writer, and is well-known for his best-selling textbook: An Introduction to Database Systems (Addison Wesley). C.J. is an exceptionally clear-thinking writer who can lay out principles and theory in a way easily understood by his audience.

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SQL and Relational Theory: How to Write Accurate SQL Code 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book still requires iterative reading on my part because the style of language is difficult for me. I often have to scan, re-read, look up supplementary readings from elsewhere, return, etc. Still, this is an invaluable experience for me and I am all the better for it. You might have your own frustrations with the book when you find yourself asking, "but what do you suggest instead?" You might find your answer elsewhere in the book, or you might have to work out the answer for yourself, but that is still valuable in the long run. When I first read this book, I became angry -- at all the incorrect and incomplete education I paid for in the classroom. I was angry at all the wasted time, but now this book gives me an opportunity to make corrections in my own foundations and make better products. The purpose of this book (and any other book written by Date) is to emphasize (using my paraphrasing): (a) all database professionals should base their database design and work from a strong base of relational database theory if they want to make better databases and better SQL code, (b) database professionals who base their knowledge on SQL have a flimsy foundation at best, and (c) SQL databases are not fully relational because of reasons summarized in Appendix B (SQL departures from the relational model).
AlexNYC More than 1 year ago
Way too much discussion of why a relation is not exactly a table and such