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Overview

Squawk 7700, an aviation autobiography by Peter M. Buffington, tells of his personal adventure into the world of aviation to achieve a professional airline pilot career. He provides riveting details of daily operations within the aviation industry, and the struggles flight crew members face to maintain their lifestyles.

Buckle your seatbelt and prepare for an eye-opening, turbulent ride into the world of aviation from the pilot's seat. From ...
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Squawk 7700

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Overview

Squawk 7700, an aviation autobiography by Peter M. Buffington, tells of his personal adventure into the world of aviation to achieve a professional airline pilot career. He provides riveting details of daily operations within the aviation industry, and the struggles flight crew members face to maintain their lifestyles.

Buckle your seatbelt and prepare for an eye-opening, turbulent ride into the world of aviation from the pilot's seat. From student pilot at age 15, to flight instructor, to nighttime cargo pilot, and finally to first officer aboard the ATR 42 and ATR 72 turboprop airliners, island hopping across the Caribbean, Buffington relates his personal experiences. He explains why recent accidents, like Colgan Air Flight 3407, in Buffalo, NY, and Comair Flight 5191, in Lexington, KY, can occur.

My personal experiences as an airline pilot and as acting first officer aboard US Airways Flight 1549 that ditched into the Hudson River, I recommend Squawk 7700 for anyone interested in an aviation career, and mandatory reading for those who fly on our national airline system.

- Jeff Skiles, First Officer US Airways Flight 1549
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Editorial Reviews

Reviewer - Wayne Mann
Television shows such as the PBS series Flying Cheap very adroitly lift Peter’s words from the pages of his book, and provide audio visual validation to his experiences. Squawk 7700 provides the reader with an excellent insight as to the coming shortage of qualified pilots this country will experience during the second decade of the 21st century. This book should be mandatory reading at the first year level for any student at any professional pilot training institution.
Research Peer - R IH8Colgan
As a recent widow of Continental's Flight 3407 crash outside of Buffalo, New York, I found this book compelling to read. What an isight to the world of aviation. Thank you Mr. Buffington for shedding light on aviation, safety, and pilot fatigue. I wish everyone who gets on an aipcraft or knows someone who does, would buy and read your book. I loved it.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940012462336
  • Publisher: Peter M. Buffington
  • Publication date: 9/1/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 379
  • Sales rank: 331,420
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Peter Buffington, author, has been a licensed commercial pilot for 15 years. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Aeronautical Sciences from the University of North Dakota and is currently employed as a Software Quality Analyst in the Midwest. He flies for pleasure outside of work. Peter has logged more than 2,700 hours total flying time in countless aircraft makes and models.

Peter began writing the first edition of Squawk 7700 in October of 2000, completion was in May of 2001. The first edition was published by Morris Publishing in July 2001. Two months after publishing the first edition, the events of 9-11-2001 unfolded forever changing the airline industry. Peter's motivation in publishing his personal story was his desire to see change in the regional airline industry. The regional airline's hiring practices, corner-cutting, and Pay-For-Training were pushing the moral and ethical envelope. Peter knew by publishing his story many aspects of the the airlines daily operations would be exposed.

Nearly 10 years passed since publication of the first edition. Two recent air disasters motivated Peter to publish a second edition of Squawk 7700. The crashes of Comair Flight 5191 in Lexington, Kentucky and Colgan Air 3407 in Buffalo New York. Shortly after the US Airways Flight 1549 incident in New York, Peter and Jeff Skiles began working together to see that changes were implemented in the way regional airlines hired pilots, and to expose the daily lifestyle of a regional airline pilot. Jeff Skiles was called to testify before congress on numerous occasions in 2009. Jeff explained why change was urgently needed in the regional airline industry. On July 30th, 2010, the U.S. House and Senate Passed the FAA Safety Bill setting forth new pilot hiring minimums and training requirements. On August 1st, 2010 the POTUS signed the FAA Safety Bill HR 5900.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 11 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2010

    Super read

    I purchased the eBook for my Nook during a business trip. I thought I would read bits of this book over the course of several weeks. I started reading on my flight and I ended up staying up most of the night in my hotel room, and finished reading the second day. Amazing story. I appreciate how much devotion and effort went into becoming a pilot. The experiences that were shared at the regional airlines should be read by everyone, this was a huge eye opener to the inside daily operations of aviation. Colorful descriptions and characters and plenty of intense moments will keep you reading. If you have ever even thought of being a pilot this is a must read! I hope that the author will come out with more hard copies of the second edition.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 14, 2011

    Airline Captain's Review

    I began my airline career in 1978, the same year the Airline Deregulation Act became law. This "dawn of deregulation" also marked the beginning of "the demise of a profession". A highly placed official in the Federal Aviation Administration recently commented, "They didn't just deregulate the economic aspects with regards to fares and route structures, they deregulated everything-including safety". The assumption that economist Adam Smith's "invisible hand" of economic management would somehow provide for a safer and more efficient airline transportation system in this country cannot be more effectively disproved than by the chronicles of Peter Buffington's career path as a professional pilot. Although two decades separate his trials and tribulations from mine to obtain federal licensing permitting us to fly commercially in an effort to build the experience necessary become employed by a major airline, the insufferable challenges remain unchanged. Peter's descriptions of the existence of dangerously poor maintenance and unscrupulous pressure to ignore Federal Aviation Regulations at entry level air freight and air taxi charter operations were chillingly reminiscent of my experiences in the 1970s. The actions, or perhaps more accurately reactions, taken by Congress to supplant the "invisible hand" with a "visible hammer" only validate the voracity of Peter's accounts of his experiences while attempting to pursue a career as a professional pilot. Television shows such as the PBS series Flying Cheap very adroitly lift Peter's words from the pages of his book, and provide audio visual validation to his experiences. Unfortunately these deplorable conditions have begun to migrate upward into the flight operations of major airlines as well. Unsustainable working conditions and intolerable pay scales have led to the establishment of the term "pilot pushing" becoming a common topic of dissention between pilots and management at many US airlines. There was a time in the country when the best and brightest were attracted to this profession. Today, when pilots are given the opportunity to return to the flight decks of their airlines after being furloughed during downturns in the economy, it not uncommon for half of them to decline the offer as they find the rewards of employment in other industries more desirable-just as Peter has. The extension of the mandatory retirement age for airline pilots from age 60 to 65 has provided a temporary reprise from what is surely an impending shortage of qualified pilots to man the flight decks of this country's airlines. Squawk 7700 provides the reader with an excellent insight as to the coming shortage of qualified pilots this country will experience during the second decade of the 21st century. This book should be mandatory reading at the first year level for any student at any professional pilot training institution.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2011

    DEAD CENTER IN THE RING OF AVIATION TRUTH!

    Peter's honest accounts of his experiences as a pilot make his book a "must read" for anyone interested in the state of aviation today. Stories such as his remind us that change is needed desperately in the airline industry. Pilots deserve better. Passengers deserve better. Squawk now for CHANGE!!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 2, 2011

    Pleasantly Surprised

    I was pleasantly surprised by this one. The story grabbed my attention after reading the first few pages and it didn't take long for me to decide that I couldn't put the book down. I fly for pleasure and I always wondered what a flying career might have been like. The story provides us with a great representation of what the state of the industry is, the sacrifices necessary to become an airline pilot, while presenting us with humorous, nail-biting, and intriguing moments. My personal favorites: When the author takes his college date for an airplane ride (I won't spoil it), the landing at "Beef Island" in the Caribbean, and the colorful descriptions and intensity of flying a turboprop in the tropics. The factual analysis of some of aviation's recent events opened up my mind. I enjoyed the author's perspective and I agree entirely with his viewpoint. A close family friend has a son who is flying for the airlines, and the stories that I hear from him make me recommend this book as "long overdue". Check out this book, well worth it.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2011

    Who is flying your plane?

    As a recent widow of Continental's Flight 3407 crash outside of Buffalo, New York, I found this book compelling to read. What an insight into the world of aviation. Thank you Mr. Buffington for shedding light on aviation, safety, and pilot fatigue. I wish everyone who gets on an aircraft or knows someone who does, would buy and read your book. I loved it.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 19, 2011

    Couldn't put it down, must read for aviation students

    Stumbled across this one and decided to give it a try, downloaded the eBook version to my Nook. I couldn't put it down, had to read straight through to finish it. Very cool firsthand account of the author's journey into the world of aviation from kid to FO on the ATR, and beyond. What he reveals should be mandatory reading for aviation students. No spoilers here, just pick this one up and read it, you'll enjoy start to finish.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2013

    Great book filled with exciting turns and twists. Great descript

    Great book filled with exciting turns and twists. Great descriptive details that made me feel like I was right there by the author's side throughout the book. I felt the joys, thrills, intensity, anger, and sadness that he conveyed along the way. If you are interested in aviation, or someone wanting to know the inner workings of the aviation industry, I highly recommend this book. If you are looking for a literary read like Tom Clancy, this is not for you. But I give the author 5 stars because he wrote this from his heart, and clearly a story that should have been told a long time ago.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2013

    Let me get this straight, the author rails against PFT (Pay for

    Let me get this straight, the author rails against PFT (Pay for Training) yet leaves after one week sticking AE with a HUGE training bill for him? If anything, this is a great argument FOR PFT!

    Also, what was with all of the reg violations? One right after another. I kept waiting for the author to to the right thing, but it never happened..

    Taking off in a 500 lb over-gross 310 was one thing(what did he do to the manifest to make it look legal?), but then taking off again into freezing rain at approach mins, out of duty time AND over-gross? He was VERY lucky on that one. Others were diverting to avoid that mess. Freezing rain in anything can be a killer. Especially on departure. The only place to go is down. So, he launches anyway after telling the boss he was staying the night because of how bad it was, just so he wouldn't have to hear the boss yell. Huh??

    I got tired of hearing the whining about not having food to eat while flying out of PR. He had a Subway close by. On the days he was out looking for an apartment, he could have bought a couple of sandwiches and iced them down in his hotel room. God only knows how many times I had to do this. Better yet, buy a foot long and offer Capt Carlos half of it. It may have helped with the "problem". It definitely couldn't have hurt!

    How many times can someone be late (Capt Carlos), causing big problems in the system, and not lose their job? Also, was dispatch really letting them go without rest time? Something fishy there.

    I could go on and on..

    I lost some good friends (dead) over the years because they broke regs and/or did something stupid. I never knew anyone to die because the airplane did something stupid. Fly by the book and learn to say no. Trust your gut. It's not worth dying (and killing people who trusted you with their lives) just because you didn't want to hear the boss yell at you.

    If you're just starting out, it won't be easy. Lots of sacrifices. There is light at the end of the tunnel if you work hard and put up with the newbie crap. Know the regs, company policies, and the airplane you're flying better than anyone around you. You'll earn a lot of respect this way.

    I would not trade the career I had for anything in the world.

    Oh, one more thing, if you're "on the ramp" taxiing in at 10:45 with a noon show for the next one and the Dir of Safety keeps you waiting for two hours before he sees you, then you missed your flight. And since Capt Carlos was called in afterwards, it means he missed it, too!

    Oooops!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2013

    Needed to be more direct and to the point

    While the overall subject matter was interesting, the method with which the author told the story left a lot to be desired for me. There was a lot of repetition of the same phrases, or entire paragraphs altogether, throughout the entire book.

    I do understand that the main point of the book is that the aviation industry is in dire need of more strict regulation, but to me the overall tone of the book comes off as whiny instead of strictly informative.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews

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