Squeal and Squawk: Barnyard Talk

Overview

Cows give us milk, for ice cream and cheese. But my dog gives me kisses, and tail wags ... and fleas. Welcome to the barnyard! Eighteen rollicking poems explore the lives of farm animals. From a limerick about a rooster in love with a duck to an ode to the lazy life of a cow, these comically illustrated rhymes take a humorous look at our squealing and squawking animal friends
Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (12) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $10.29   
  • Used (10) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Cows give us milk, for ice cream and cheese. But my dog gives me kisses, and tail wags ... and fleas. Welcome to the barnyard! Eighteen rollicking poems explore the lives of farm animals. From a limerick about a rooster in love with a duck to an ode to the lazy life of a cow, these comically illustrated rhymes take a humorous look at our squealing and squawking animal friends
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
An unusual combination of Looney Tunes-type action mixed with a deft use of line and color, Slonim's (Moishe's Miracle) ink and acrylic illustrations provide plenty of humor in this uneven volume. The poem "Mad Magog," for example, features a cow-chasing goose, a premise Slonim exploits by picturing the hapless cow trying to climb a telephone pole to escape. In "Love," a rooster "with terrible luck/ has fallen in love with a duck," and he's shown forlornly holding a bouquet of flowers as the long-lashed duck swims far across the spread. While Pearson (The Drowsy Hours) sometimes stumbles in meter, the content of her limericks and couplets can be amusingly offbeat. In "Chuck's Duck," a daffy quacker dances to the farmer's saxophone playing a "Whack/ thwack/ maniac/ Hackensack beat." The human figures are more cartoonlike and less distinctive, but each illustration offers a plethora of witty animal characters. A poem that rhythmically recites various kinds of chickens ("Chantecler and Delaware,/ Jersey Giant, Buckeye, Brahma") contains a breed-appropriate bevy of dancing, strutting fowls along with a roasted chicken on a plate. The artwork provides a visual story frame for the poems, beginning with a sleepless child who initially shines a flashlight on the squawking animals in the barn. The fitting final image presents the child slumbering atop a puppy-litter-style tangle of cows and chickens in the blue moonlight. Ages 5-9. (Mar.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Eighteen poems about barnyard animals with playful text and vibrant illustrations reminiscent of the dreamy-eyed characters in "Garfield and Friends." This volume is not only an easy entry into poetry, it is educational as well. "Stomach Math" is anatomically correct and "Recite Your Chickens" would impress even the best of poultry farmers. Most of the poems are just plain entertaining, especially for older readers who enjoy reading some semi-gross verse—especially reading what a chicken will eat...nasty! Slonim's ink and acrylic illustrations enhance Pearson's text quite eloquently. Touted on the book jacket flap as "bedtime poems," this verse can be read at any time of the day or night with equal enthusiasm. They are also potential candidates for memorizing as well as for impressing friends and relatives in those ever-stressful classroom recitations. Rarely will anyone fall asleep to the rhythm of these rhymes. 2004, Marshall Cavendish, Ages 9 to 12.
—Elizabeth Young
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-A fresh and funny poetic view of the overworked subject of farm animals is a tall order, but that's exactly what Pearson delivers. From goats on the roof to flying pigs that prefer the mud to the sky, each poem presents a consistently unique perspective. A nostalgic sense of place and mood dominate in selections such as "Heading Home," which describes a line of cows "-looking fine/in the glow of setting sun,/never varying their pace,/each one always in her place,/strolling home, her thoughts on hay,/day/by day/by day/by day." Slonim's hilarious ink-and-acrylic illustrations add energy and vitality to the rhymes. Each page is designed to complement the specific poem. For example, the spread for the short poem "Love" captures the poignancy of a heartbroken rooster who has fallen in love with a duck by placing the two far apart on a barren background: "But the rooster can't swim,/And the chances are slim/That his sweetheart will ever speak CLUCK." This is a clever, quick-reading collection with loads of child appeal.-Lee Bock, Glenbrook Elementary School, Pulaski, WI Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761451600
  • Publisher: Amazon Childrens Publishing
  • Publication date: 3/28/2004
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 5 - 9 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.92 (w) x 11.24 (h) x 0.41 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)