Squirrel's Fun Day

Squirrel's Fun Day

by Lisa Moser, Valeri Gorbachev
     
 

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Got to go, got to go, got to go, go, go! The energetic Squirrel is eager to make sure his friends have fun in four charming new (mis)adventures.

Squirrel is busy, busy, busy — and determined to have a fun day! Mouse has cleaning to do, but it’s nothing that Squirrel’s frenetically helpful sweeping won’t take care of. Turtle may be

Overview

Got to go, got to go, got to go, go, go! The energetic Squirrel is eager to make sure his friends have fun in four charming new (mis)adventures.

Squirrel is busy, busy, busy — and determined to have a fun day! Mouse has cleaning to do, but it’s nothing that Squirrel’s frenetically helpful sweeping won’t take care of. Turtle may be too slow to run, run, run around the pond, but Squirrel has a rocky plan to help Turtle get across. And when Rabbit is reluctant to alter his grasseating routine, Squirrel’s comedic assistance makes for an unexpected adventure. Welcome back the funny, exhausting Squirrel and his ever-patient friends in a medley of stories perfectly suited for reading alone or reading aloud.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Well-intentioned, overzealous Squirrel embarks on further misadventures with his friends in this follow-up to Squirrel’s World (2007). Squirrel’s hyperkinetic movements and chatter power this early reader’s four chapters: “Got to go. Got to go. Got to go, go, go!” he chimes as he zips off to find fun. When Mouse tells him that she’s too busy sweeping out her tree stump to have fun, he makes a mess trying to help her with his bushy tail (“Sweep, sweep, sweep!”); she then agrees to join his search for fun, only to get stuck in the mud. Squirrel’s stab at building a bridge across a pond with Turtle also has muddy results, and his attempt to help Rabbit leave a trail of pebbles to guide him home backfires. Gorbachev’s earth-toned ink-and-watercolor illustrations amplify the story’s buoyant humor and highlight the animals’ personalities, from Squirrel’s exuberance to Rabbit’s cautiousness. Ample art and Squirrel’s playfully repetitious speech tailor the story to emerging readers. True to life, there are some bumps in the road, but the feel-good ending cements this quartet’s friendship. Ages 5–7. (June)
Children's Literature - Keri Collins Lewis
Squirrel is full of energy and is always busy, busy, busy. One day, he decides he wants his friends to go with him on grand adventures in the woods. But his friends are reluctant to give up their plans. Mouse wants to clean her house. Turtle does not want to leave his log. Rabbit wants to eat grass at the big oak tree. Squirrel won't take no for an answer. He eagerly helps Mouse by sweeping her home with his tail, unaware he has destroyed her nest and food stores. When he sees Turtle cannot run around the pond, Squirrel decides they must build a bridge to speed Turtle's travel, and he covers Turtle with mud. After deciding he would accompany Rabbit on the way to the big oak tree, Squirrel zips off to play and doesn't realize the significance of the pebbles Rabbit leaves along the path to help him find his way home. When Squirrel has time to reflect on his day, he suspects his friends did not have as much fun as he did. He fears they won't be his friends anymore, but they surprise him with a picnic of strawberries and starlight, happy they had gotten out of their routines and tried new things. This follow-up to Squirrel's World will delight readers with its engaging characters and spirited illustrations. Adults familiar with highly energetic and impulsive children will appreciate the gentle message of Moser's beginning reader chapter book: overactive kids can push us to the edge of our limits and comfort zones, but their zest for life can add beauty and adventure to our lives. Reviewer: Keri Collins Lewis
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—Beginning readers will enjoy spending the day with "busy, busy, busy" Squirrel. Although Mouse intends to clean her nest, she sets off with Squirrel after he "sweeps, sweeps, sweeps" her nesting materials and food. As they are playing, she falls into a mud hole and Squirrel rescues her with a long blade of grass. He engages Turtle in a race around the pond, but becomes frustrated with Turtle's slow pace. Squirrel is surprised to discover that Turtle can swim faster than he can run. Next, he coaxes Rabbit to have "fun, fun, fun" on the way to the tree where he always eats lunch. Rabbit insists on leaving a pebble trail so he can find his way home, but his plan doesn't work this time. Later Squirrel picks flowers to present to his friends as a gesture of thanks for their company, but when they are nowhere to be found, he wonders if they may not have enjoyed the day's activities as much as he did. Readers will enjoy the surprise awaiting him. Squirrel's repetitive speech patterns reinforce his character and give newer readers some relief decoding this fun-filled drama. The expressive pen-and-watercolor illustrations in varied layouts are perfectly placed with the text. A great, great, great addition to delight fans of Arnold Lobel's Frog and Toad Are Friends (HarperCollins, 1970) and Wong Herbert Yee's Upstairs Mouse, Downstairs Mole (Houghton Mifflin, 2005).—Laura Scott, Farmington Community Library, MI
Kirkus Reviews
This squirrel is ready for adventure! Take one appealing, energetic, spunky and absolutely indefatigable squirrel. Add a quiet mouse who loves his house, a slow-walking, fast-swimming turtle, and a rabbit full of habits, and you have the recipe for an advanced early reader replete with action, humor and warmth. The text has appropriately limited vocabulary with the occasional challenging word, a natural flow, generous onomatopoeia and just enough repetition to give young readers confidence and encouragement. Each chapter describes a different part of the day, and lively, engaging watercolor-and-ink illustrations show Squirrel as he valiantly attempts to include his friends in his very fun day but doesn't quite manage to take into account their quirks and varying abilities. When Squirrel can't find his friends, he pauses to reflect and realizes he may have made some mistakes. Will he ever be forgiven? A very happy surprise awaits. Lovable characters, accessible text, and fresh, spirited illustrations combine nicely here to create a story even the most reluctant readers are sure to enjoy. (Early reader. 5-8)
From the Publisher
Lovable characters, accessible text, and fresh, spirited illustrations combine nicely here to create a story even the most reluctant readers are sure to enjoy.
—Kirkus Reviews

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763657260
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
06/11/2013
Series:
Candlewick Sparks Series
Pages:
48
Sales rank:
1,115,753
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
250L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Lisa Moser is the author of The Monster in the Backpack, illustrated by Noah Z. Jones, and Kisses on the Wind, illustrated by Kathryn Brown, among other titles. She lives in Wisconsin.

Valeri Gorbachev is the author-illustrator of many books for children, including The Missing Chick and The Best Cat. He is also the illustrator of All for Pie, Pie for All and Little Bunny and the Magic Christmas Tree, both by David Martin. Valeri Gorbachev lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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