St. Francis Of Assisi

St. Francis Of Assisi

4.3 13
by G. K. Chesterton
     
 

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2010 Reprint of 1923 Edition. In this brilliant reflection on the poor friar of Assisi, G.K. Chesterton unfolds the life and times of St. Francis, from his conversion as a young man to his receiving of the Stigmata at the end of his life. While many modern biographers stumble in their effort to grasp the essence of the saint, Chesterton shows that Francis' entire life

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2010 Reprint of 1923 Edition. In this brilliant reflection on the poor friar of Assisi, G.K. Chesterton unfolds the life and times of St. Francis, from his conversion as a young man to his receiving of the Stigmata at the end of his life. While many modern biographers stumble in their effort to grasp the essence of the saint, Chesterton shows that Francis' entire life, his prayer, his poverty, his asceticism, his love of creation, and all his eccentricities, flowed from his profound love for Christ and all men. In Chesterton's colorful prose, St. Francis shines with the splendor of sanctity and calls each of us to the same intense and animating love for God and His people.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781891396502
Publisher:
Martino Fine Books
Publication date:
12/27/2010
Pages:
186
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.43(d)

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St. Francis of Assisi 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
G.K. Chesterton is one of the best Christian writers of the twentieth century. Prolific and artistic, he had the knack for combining a classic British commentary sense to any historical Christian subject, making it both the object of cultural interest and often historic reverence. As St. Francis of Assisi was one of the primary influences on Chesterton's decision to convert to Roman Catholicism (Chesterton once described his conversion as being largely due to wanting to belong to the same institution that had produced St. Francis), it makes sense that Chesterton would devote considerable energies toward this biography. Chesterton said that there are essentially three ways to approach a biography of a figure such as St. Francis - one can be dispassionately objective (or at least as much as can pass for such a stance), looking at things from a 'purely' historical standpoint; one can go to the opposite extreme and treat the figure as an object of devotion and worship; or one can take a third path (and you've guessed correctly if you assumed this was Chesterton's route) of looking at the character as an interested outsider, someone in the modern world but still one involved in the same kinds of structures and virtues as the one being studied. Chesterton's prose is snappy and lively, witty and bit sardonic at times. Chesterton is not afraid to digress to make his own points, and like the intellectual critic who cannot contain the myriad of responses to particular points, Chesterton treats us to a generous collection of tangential observations. One discovers, for instance, Chesterton's opinion of modern British history (that it reads more like journalism than like a developed narrative) - he makes the observation that journalists rarely think to publish a 'life' until the death of the subject; this of course cannot be helped in the case of Francis of Assisi, but the method of the media serves to highlight the difference in world-view between then and now. This is a spiritual biography - it does not simply go from event to event in Francis' life, but rather looks as the development of his spirituality, his calling, his order and his influence in later church (and more general) history. In his discussion, he looks at miracles and poetic production, political realities and logical fallacies, ancient sentiments and present-day practices. Francis is seen in many ways as the Mirror of Christ (not quite the same thing as the WWJD fad of the current day, but approximating the sense in some regards), but this sets up an interesting logical situation - if Francis is like Christ, then Christ is in some ways like Francis. Chesterton points out the importance of the difference, likening it to the difference between creator and creature, but there is still the interesting development in history where some tried to make Francis a second Christ (something Francis himself would have opposed bitterly). Fun, fascinating, spiritual without succumbing to kitsch, intellectual without being overblown, this book is a classic on Francis, and a classic by Chesterton, a small miracle of Francis (in the many sense of the term).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow, this perspective is great. It tells the life and history of the times that Frncis was growing up in and coming to his place through real like lens. It is gree so the typos and errors of the scan are acceptable, not too many to be a hinderance to understanding. Definite great read for growing in God.
Six_Horse_Stew More than 1 year ago
This is a must read for anyone studying the saints. However, Chesterton is not easy to read. Chesterton's works require thoughtful attention or the reader will soon get lost in a maze of complex thoughts that may cause one to put the work aside. In other words, it takes an active reading style to read this author.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kamaki More than 1 year ago
Chesterton brings such a breadth and depth of knowledge and connections that his writings are always a bit hard to read. Through all of that, his depiction of Francis is wonderful, illuminating and inspiring. I learned some facts, like Francis has his eyeballs cauterized to overcome a growing blindness!! His trust that God would provide is very challenging for me; I could never do it the way he did it. Chesterton tells that little story well. This read is timely in view of the new Pope, Francis I. How like Francis is the Pope going to be??
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good background to the times and era of St. Francis. Not as many details about his life. I would have liked more information on the Franciscan movement. This is a good beginning biography about Francis.
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