St. Patrick's Day
  • St. Patrick's Day
  • St. Patrick's Day

St. Patrick's Day

by Anne Rockwell, Lizzy Rockwell
     
 

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On St. Parick's Day, come dance a jig with the students in the classroom ALA Booklist calls "a lively place."

Today in Mrs. Madoff's class we all wore something green to school. Kate played the fiddle and we danced to Irish music. Then we learned about St. Patrick and many Irish tales and traditions. Now we know why there are no snakes in Ireland. Not

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Overview

On St. Parick's Day, come dance a jig with the students in the classroom ALA Booklist calls "a lively place."

Today in Mrs. Madoff's class we all wore something green to school. Kate played the fiddle and we danced to Irish music. Then we learned about St. Patrick and many Irish tales and traditions. Now we know why there are no snakes in Ireland. Not every-one in school is all Irish like me, but we all can celebrate St. Patrick's Day together!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Cynthia Levinson
The otherwise unnamed narrator of this book, identified as Evan from the lunchbox he carries and the shamrocks decorating the flyleaf, wears green to school on St. Patrick's Day. His friend Pablo wears green sneakers. Teams of other children also wear green while they share what they have learned about Ireland for a class program about the holiday. Evan and his teammates draw pictures and write about St. Patrick, who taught people to be kind to each other. Their classmates, including Michiko and Eveline, explain the saint's role in ridding Ireland of snakes, dance a jig, and distribute shamrocks. All Irish, Evan relates his family's history. After school, he and his mother share her homemade soda bread with Pablo and his mother. Through the diverse members of the class and through their participation in celebrating the holiday, the message of the book is clearly conveyed: "So many Irish people came across the sea to America that we celebrate St. Patrick's Day whether we're Irish or not." One in a series of books that focuses on Mrs. Madoff's classroom, this title conveys basic information about St. Patrick's Day in a straightforward, matter-of-fact way. There is no story, conflict, adventure, suspense, or subtlety. There is nothing for readers to investigate or with which to engage. The illustrations—pastels with a predominance of green, including Evan's eyes, which are the same color as his shirt—are similarly lifeless. If no other books on St. Patrick's Day are available, school children could give a report on the report that Evan and his classmates give. It would likely be brief and dull. Reviewer: Cynthia Levinson
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—The children in Mrs. Madoff's classroom are once again participating in holiday-related activities: wearing something green, writing reports, acting in a play, dancing a jig. Evan is lucky enough to be all Irish, and he shows a picture of himself on a visit to his grandparents in Ireland. At home, he continues to celebrate. Lizzy Rockwell's clear, vivid spreads evoke an active learning environment (though really now, 10 students?). The title does not mention Catholicism or Patrick's role as a Saint, and avoids any religious elements in the traditions (the three leaves of a shamrock are usually said to represent the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, but not here). However, St. Patrick's Day has become a secular holiday, and this welcome addition to the series clearly outlines the importance of this day in March on which everyone is Irish.—Lisa Egly Lehmuller, St. Patrick's Catholic School, Charlotte, NC
Kirkus Reviews
The Rockwells mother and daughter bring to St. Patrick's Day the same cogent, ecumenical treatment they've brought to the other titles in the Mrs. Madoff series (Presidents' Day, 2008, etc.). "On St. Patrick's Day," says Evan, "I wore my green shirt, green pants, and even my green striped socks. Pablo wore green sneakers." Once at school, the kids work on their St. Patrick's Day projects: Three kids write a story, two put on a play, three others perform a jig and two do a report on the shamrock. It's exactly the same scene that's played out in elementary schools across the country every March, and as such it will be sweetly familiar to readers. Given the paucity of books on the subject despite perennial demand, it will be deservedly welcomed by teachers in many settings. (Picture book. 3-6)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060501976
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
01/26/2010
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
479,227
Product dimensions:
9.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

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